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Polish 
Researcher 
Visits 
Wisconsin 



My 
First 
Cooking 
Contest 



How to Run 
A Successful 
Family 
Business 



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CRANBERRIES 



THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

January 1989 Vol. 53, No. 1 




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Page 2 CRANBERRIES January 1989 



Spent Summer at Wisconsin Marsh 



Polish Researcher Plans to Introduce 
Cranberry Production to His Country 



Pawel Wasiak is nuts about 
cranberries. 

The tall, soft-spoken researcher 
is so interested in the tart, bright- 
red fruit that he left his native 
Poland for three months last 
summer to work and study in the 
cranberry marshes of central 
Wisconsin. 

There really is no such thing as a 
cranberry industry in Poland. A 
few native, wild varieties of cran- 
berries exist, but nothing has yet 
been done to manage them for 
greater jdeld. In fact, Wasiak works 
at the only experimental station 
studying cranberries in eastern 
Europe. 

"In my town in northern Poland, 
there is no problem getting cran- 
berries during October and Novem- 
ber," Wasiak said, because his 
experimental station is marketing 
its crop then. "There is demand for 
cranberries. People like. But, very 
few cranberries sold elsewhere. In 
Warsaw, to the south, people can 
buy native varieties but they are 
very expensive." 

All fruit in Poland is harvested 
for fresh use. None is processed for 
juice because the crop is so small. 
People do go out and pick the native 
cranberries, but Wasiak likened this 
hand harvesting to a scene from a 
Wisconsin marsh generations ago. 
The United States, and specifically 
Wisconsin, has an almost centuries- 
Did tradition of cranberry cultiva- 



COVER 
POLISH researcher Paw^el 
iVasiak holds a big, bright, red 
iVisconsin cranberry 'twixt his 
humb and index finger. Wasiak 
ipent last summer at Northland 
IJranberries in Warrens and 
lopes to transfer the fruits of 
lis research to his native land. 
I story about the Polish visitor 
tarts on this page. 



tion. And that's what Wasiak was 
looking for last summer: the exper- 
tise gained over time by agricultu- 
ral experts here. 

The Warrens, Wise, marsh that 
became his temporary home last 
summer is operated by Northland 
Cranberries, Inc. of Wisconsin 
Fiapids. Northland is publicly owned 
and the biggest grower in the state. 
Its nine marshes have a total of 656 
acres in production. 

Wasiak and Northland were a 
good match because of the com- 
pany's commitment to modern 
techniques of agronomy. Also, its 
varied marshes, scattered through- 
out central and northern Wiscon- 
sin, provided a smorgasbord of vine 
types and growing conditions for 
Wasiak to observe. 

RESEARCHER Pawel also is a 
dreamer. Get him talking about 
cranberries and you'll find he's 
determined to make them part of 
the Polish diet. He can visualize a 
booming cranberry business in 
Poland where now there is none. 
He thinks beyond the issue of 
national politics, too, believing it 
will take a strong economic system 
for Poland to realize and nurture 



what Wasiak sees as tremendous 
potential for private industry there. 

Wasiak has an entrepreneurial 
spirit and is certain that cranberries 
— fresh fruit as well as juice — can 
be big in Poland. He would like to 
plant his own 1-acre commercial 
marsh, perhaps next year. 

"Cranberries in Poland can some 
day be very good business because 
of high price, big population and 
not much competition," he said. 

While Wasiak would like to build 
his own cranberry business, he is a 
realistic man. He knows it will take 
time. Building a strong economic 
system in his country also will play 
a role. 

"Must be good economic system," 
he said. "If that is there, every- 
thing is good. 

"I can wait 10, 20 years to have 
cranberries. Maybe for my son, 
Peter. He is very interested for being 
just 11 years old. He already works 
on the experimental marsh." 

Wasiak, 35, is from Szczecinek, 
Poland, a town of 40,000. His wife, 
who specializes in plant disease 
and insect control, works with him 
there. His experimental marsh is 
supported by the nearby Institute 



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CRANBERRIES January 1989 Page 3 



of Pomology in Skiemiewice. 

Wasiak's 25 acre research sta- 
tion is home to about 20 varieties of 
hybrid vines, including some that 
originally came from Wisconsin. 
His studies in Poland focus on new 
vine varieties, plus use of pesti- 
cides, fungicides and herbicides. 
The station is only six years old. 
Since it takes about five years for 
cranberry vines to become fully 
productive, much of his work is in 
its infancy. 

THE CHURCH of the Brethren 
in Elgin, 111., played a key role in 
bringing Wasiak to Wisconsin for 
the summer. According to W. Lamar 
Gibble, director of the Brethren 
Service/Polish Agricultural Ex- 
change Program, the church 
arranges for 50 to 60 Polish scien- 
tists to come to the United States 
each year. In turn, U.S researchers 
study in Poland. He added that 
these exchanges have been made 
for more than 30 years, even while 
cold wars were blazing and the two 
governments had no official rela- 
tions. 

This spring, Northland responded 



to an appeal made to Wisconsin 
cranberry growers by the exchange 
program. The church was seeking 
a marsh for Wasiak to work and 
learn at. 

John Swendrowski, Northland 
Cranberries president, liked Wasi- 
ak's strong research background 
and offered to help. 



"We're very committed to taking 
a scientific approach to growing 
cranberries and have our own 
agronomist on staff," Swendrowski 
said. "Anytime two scientists work 
together, I believe both can benefit. 
So we decided to host Pawel." 

Swendrowski also had personal 
reasons for making the exchange. 



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His grandparents were from Poland 
and his psurents, who live in Racine, 
both speak Polish. 

Wasiak's summer at Northland 
has grown beyond an exchange of 
cranberry research. He has been a 
teacher as well, bringing a Polish 
cultural experience to those he has 
worked with. 

"Pawel is a very interesting 
human being," Swendrowski said. 
"He has vision and is a bit of a 
philosopher. 

"It's been good for our men to 
talk with him. How often can 
someone in Warrens, Wise, hear 
about day-in and day-out experien- 
ces in Poland? There's no doubt 
Pawel learned technically, while 
our people learned culturally." 

At Northland, Wasiak has ob- 
served new plant species, more 
efficient equipment for harvesting, 
better pesticides, herbicides and 
marsh irrigation. 

"In United States, there is irriga- 
tion and that is best for crop devel- 
opment," Wasiak said. He also 
praised the varieties of fertilizers 
available here, as well as the grow- 
ers' prudent management of pesti- 
cides. 

In Poland, there is no mechan- 



CRANBERRIES 



THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

SEND CORRESPONDENCE TO: 

P.O. BOX 249 

COBALT CT 06414 

(203) 342-4730 

PUBLISHER & EDITOR: BOB TAYLOR 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: CAROLYN GILMORE 
(508) 763-5206 

\DVISORS & CORRESPONDENTS 

MASSACHUSETTS — Irving E Demoranuille, 
director, Cranberry Experiment Station 

NEW JERSEY — Phillip E Marucci. Cranberry & Blueberry 
Specialist. Buddtown; Elizabeth G Carpenter, Chatsworth, 

NOVA SCOTIA — Robert A Murray. Horticulturist, Berry 
>ops. Research Station, Truro 

OREGON — Arthur Poole, Coos County Extension Agent, 
^oquille 

WASHINGTON — Azmi Y Shawa, Horticulturist and 

xlension Agent in Horticulture, Coastal Washington 

esearch & Extension Unit. Long Beach 

WISCONSIN — Tod D Planer, Farm Management Agent, 
/ood County 

RANBERRIES Is published monthly by DIveilKled Perlodl- 
als, Wellwyn Drive, Portland CT 06480. Second class pos- 
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sar, $28 lor two years, $2 a copy In the U.S.; $17 a year In 
anada; $20 a year In all other countries. Back copies: $2.50, 
eluding postage. Copyright 1988 by Olvertllled Periodicals. 

ISSN: 0011-0787 

Postmaster, send Form 3749 to: 

CRANBERRIES 

P.O. BOX 249 

COBALT CT 06414 



ized equipment for harvesting 
cranberries. Harvesting still is done 
with rakes and buckets that aren't 
much different than those used by 
Wisconsin growers a hundred years 
ago. Wasiak said the Institute of 
Pomology has a machine shop and 
he plans to build simple harvesting 
equipment based on photos he has 
taken this summer. 

His job here has been to take 
plant samples from Northland's 
marshes, so that a lab can trace 
nutrient levels and other informa- 
tion. Wasiak has also performed 



weed location mapping at several 
marshes. Based on this, herbicide 
application plans will be prepared 
for use next year. All statistics are 
entered into a data base Northland 
is building for better long term crop 
management. 

Northland is a member-grower 
of Ocean Spray, which produces 80 
percent of the fruit harvested in the 
$800 million cranberry industry . . . 
a number that brings a gleam to 
Wasiak's eyes. 

WHEN Wasiak returns to his 
research station in Poland at the 



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end of September, he'd like to try 
taking native vines into managed 
production for the first time. He 
also wants to experiment with 
improving some of the Russian 
varieties of cranberries. 

Planting his own small, private 
marsh remains high on Wasiak's 
priority list. 

"I like U.S., but you understand 
my country is there," says Wasiak, 
in his slightly abbreviated Eng- 
lish. "I would only live in Poland. 
Many of our young people go to 



Italy, West Germany, they want 
new life. That's not good for Poland. 
For us to have better economy, we 
must keep young people and have 
something for them. 

"I would like new time for my 
country. For that, there must be 
good economic system in Poland. 
Maybe with my research and, some 
day, my cranberry business, I can 
help to make it better." 



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IntHgulng Thnes Ahead 

Both on the national level in general and in cranberrying in 
particular, the year 1989 promises to be an exciting one, not 
devoid of threats but holding many promises. 

Macrowise, there's always the suspense that precedes the 
unfolding of a new administration in Washington. Will a Bush 
government be a Ronald Reagan rerun? Or does George Bush 
have his own vision? 

A glance at the front page as this is being written reveals 
some rough seas ahead. Large Banks Raise Prime Loan Rate to 
10V2% From 10% reads one headline. OPEC Signs Accord to 
Lower Output for Half a Year says another. Latins Want Bush 
to Help on Debts tops another story. 

And, yes, political overtones aside, our federal deficits are 
a genuine threat. Also, one doesn't have to be a genius to 
know that when the homeless rate rises so rapidly, the 
trouble is with the poUtical economy, not individual sloth. 

Things on the international scene have improved, what 
with the thaw in the Cold War. Wish George Shultz was 
going out in a more astute, less partisan fashion, but there is 
hope that 1989 may see progress in some of the world's most 
vexing problems— including those in the Middle East. 

Microwise, cranberrying will continue sailing rapidly in the 
sea of change. Integrated Pest Management has been a key 
phrase in the industry for some time now. More will be heard of 
it in the 12 months ahead. 

Just at the time more of a squeeze is being put on the use of 
chemicals, developments in other methods of control— biological 
and biotechnological— are proceeding apace. Some of the pro- 
gress being made in genetic engineering is placing agriculture 
on the cutting edge of science in a way that can only be com- 
pared to advances in space exploration. 

Chances look good for continued remarkable business growth 
in cranberrying, which must be attributed in large measure to 
the undeniable marketing genius of Ocean Spray. Also on the 
playing field, of course, are several sturdy, lean-and-mean 
independents. 

The opening of Maine to cranberrying is another exciting 
development in what lies ahead. Sight must not be lost, of 
course, of the goal of careful management of supply and 
demand, which has helped keep the cranberry from suffering 
the feast or famine fate of other crops. 

Yes, 1989 should be an exciting year. But growers are used to 
change and excitement. A hot spell here, unexpected frost 
there. New plagues. Disease outbreaks. Crops of surprising 
beauty and bounty. And, occasionally, the sight of a fox or a 
bluebird. It's all in a year's work. 

Page 8 CRANBERRIES January 1989 



Bye-Bye, 
Black Rot 

According to USDA researcher 
Allan Stretch, a solution may 
have been found to the black rot 
fungus that attacks stored 
cranberries. 

The remedy, he says, may be 
naturally occurring microorgan- 
isms that attach themselves to 
any bruises on a berry, thus pre- 
venting penetration by black rot. 

The disease particularly affects 
those cranberries that are wet 
harvested. 

The advantage of the micro- 
organism approach. Stretch says, 
is that there need be no interfer- 
ence with the way berries are 
normally handled. 



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MASSACHUSETTS 

By IRVING E. DEMORANVILLE 

Dr. Robert Devlin of the Massachusetts 
Cranberry Experiment Station attended the 
Agway Weed Control Round Table in Syra- 
cuse, N.Y., on Oct. 24-25. 

Bob also attended the New England Chem- 
ical Conference in Hampton Beach, N.H., on 
Oct. 5. 



Harvest was winding down by the end of 
October, but there were some stragglers. 
Seems to be more picking after Nov. 1 In 
recent years. 

The Massachusetts crop surpassed the 
August estimate of 1,825,000 barrels, proba- 
bly by 75,000 barrels and possibly by 125,000 
barrels. 

A few growers had small Early Blacks, but 
not like last year. Color was generally excel- 
lent, but not where vines were excessive. 
Quality was good to very good— probably 
soma Influence from late water here. 

Howes were outstanding this year. 

Generally, Cape Cod and adjacent areas, 
such as Wareham, most of Carver and 
Rochester, had excellent crops, while Inland 
and areas to the north were not as good as 
expected. 

WASHINGTON 

The 1988 crop was down from the presea- 
son estimate of 40,000 barrels but still 
exceeded every other crop of the eighties 
except for 1987's 37,309 barrels. 

Paul Bauge, Ocean Spray receiving station 
Tianager at Long Beach, gave the final total 
as 35,711 barrels. 

He attributed a later-than-normal set this 
/ear to cool weather during the June bloom- 
ng period. 
•^ Quality and coloring were good, although 



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coloring was down a bit from '87. 

WISCONSIN 

Despite a horrific summer drought, cran- 
berry growers were predicting a record crop 
for 1988. 

The estimate of 1 .336 million barrels would 
put Wisconsin up 1 percent from 1987's 1.32 
million barrels. 

Certain varieties, according to John Swen- 
drowski, president of Northland Cranberries 
of Wisconsin Rapids, responded well to 
drought conditions. 

He noted that the additional irrigation 
required was expensive. 



Wood County Historical Musaum In Wiscon- 
sin Rapids racently was given a cartif Icata of 
commendation for achlavamant In local his- 
tory by tha State Historical Society of 
Wisconsin. 

The award was presented to tha project 
chair, Pamela Walker of the South Wood 
County Historical Corp., by H. Nksholas Muilar 
III, State Historical Society director. 



The Wisconsin Farm Bureau Federation 
will hold its annual meeting Dec. 4-6 at the 
Oshkosh Centre, Oshkosh. 

Election of officers and awards will be 
among the business to take place. 



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Bill Alms to Reduce Chemical Control 



Battle lines are being drawn over 
the Farm Conservation and Water 
Protection Act, which Congress will 
take up this session. 

Sen. Wyche Fowler (D-Ga.), who 
introduced the bill, said the aim of 
the legislation is to wean farmers 
away from heavy chemical controls, 
not to shut down the chemical 
industry. 

Citing that groundwater contami- 
nation has been found in 41 states, 
Fowler said that chemical residue 
on food is believed to be a leading 
cause of cancer. The Georgian is a 
member of the Senate Agriculture 
Committee. 

Tom Wadlinger, a spokesman for 
the Washington, D.C., based Fer- 
tilizer Institute, takes issue with 

Cranberry Institute 
Elects 7 Directors 

The Cranberry Institute elected seven 
directors for 1988-89 at its recent board 
of directors meeting. 

Christopher Makepeace of A.D. 
Makepeace Co., Wareham, Mass., was 
elected chairman of the board and will 
serve on the institute's executive com- 
mittee. Richard Indermuehle of Alder 
Lake Cranberry Co., Manitowish, 
Wise, and Terry Jonjak of Trego 
Cranberry Farm, Trego, Wise, were 
also elected to serve on the executive 
committee. 

Other board members elected were: 
John C. Decas of Decas Cranberries, 
Wareham, Mass.; Tom Darlington of 
Joseph J. White Inc., Browns Mills, 
N.J.; Ralph May of C.W. Farms Ltd. 
Partnership, Delta, British Columbia, 
Canada, and Malcolm McPbail of 
Malcolm E. McPbail and Ardell G. 
McPbail, Ilwaco, Wash. 

The institute, managed by the Robert 
H. Kellen Co. of Atlanta, Ga., and 
Washington, D.C., elected Robert H. 
Kellen president. Charles Ebrhart of 
the Kellen Company's Washington 
office, was elected executive director. 

The Kellen Company is an associa- 
tion management company which has 
served food and beverage groups for 
nearly 25 years. 

The Cranberry Institute assists 
cranberry growers in resolving horti- 
cultural and environmental issues 
related to the growing of cranberries. 

Page 10 CRANBERRIES January 



the bill. 

He declares that the use of such 
organic materials as manure and 
sewer sludge are not safer for the 
environment. 

Sewer sludge contains metal and 
other harmful ingredients, he says, 
adding that the nitrates in manure 
are the same as those found in 
chemical fertilizers. 

The Fertilizer Institute's vice 
president for public affairs stated 
that only 200 pounds of commer- 
cial fertilizer are needed per acre, 
whereas 80,000 pounds of organic 
materifil are required. 

"There seems to be the attitude 
that we can go back to the way 



things used to be," he said, "when 
people had their self-sufficient farms 
and used the manure from their 
animals for their crops. Agricul- 
ture is just not like that anymore." 

In defense of his bill, Fowler 
said, "We can pay the costs now by 
transforming agriculture in a 
rational and measured fashion or 
we can pay catastrophic costs down 
the road in contaminated food and 
water supplies, increased death and 
disability." 

He claims that the nation's 
farmers use 22.3 billion pounds of 
nitrogen fertilizer and 850 million 
pounds of agricultural pesticides 
annuEilly. j 




1989 



NODJI VAN WYCHEN proudly promotes fresh cranberries andpo 
Van Wychen Cranberry Wine, the latter a product of Van Wychen 
Cranberries and the Stone Mill Winery. The photo was taken by 
CRANBERRIES correspondent Frederick M. Poss at the Warrens, 
Wise, Cranfest held in September. 



elo 



But Ants Find It Toothsome 



Cranberry Loaf Winds Up 
In Wrong Contest Group 




V-OCL? 



By LILLIAN MURPHY 

While baking isn't necessarily 
he love of my life, when there 
was an opportunity to enter our 
local cooking contest, I thought — 
»vell, there's always a first time. 
I decided to submit my recipe 
j|i'or a Cranberry, Almond and 
]kValnut Loaf, my first mistake, 
t's really a loaf of bread and 
oesn't genuinely qualify for a 
lace in the dessert category. 
Slevertheless, I promptly received 
lotification I was a finalist. 

With my usual luck, the day of 
he contest produced a blazing 
leat wave. Undaunted and armed 
/ith my sturdily wrapped mas- 

Iirpiece, I sallied forth. 
The fact that I accidentally 
J,,, ropped the whole thing getting 
Ijfjif a crowded bus, and the care- 
^jj l,j illy arranged decoration enhanc- 
■ ig my colorful entry instantly 
Iplocated itself, did nothing to 




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Call or Write: 

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P.O. Box 234 
Sydney, Florida 33587 
Phone (813) 659-0784 or 
(301)592-9712 



CRANBERRIES January 1989 Page 11 



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219 Main St. 

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Page 12 CRANBERRIES January 1988 



aze me. 

However, when I set foot in the 

(reparation kitchens and witnes- 

ed all the experienced contest- 

ints nervously cultivating their 

houghtfully contrived creations, 

began to wonder if I shouldn't 

lave taken the occasion a bit 

nore seriously, since I had, up to 

low, been rather gung ho about 

he adventure. 

The huge work area contained 

ive very well equipped kitchens 

nd — heat wave or not — the ranges 

nd ovens were all going full blast. 

considered myself fortunate to 

ave settled in a rather cozy little 

pot near an open window, but 

ly joy was short lived when I 

ealized why it was available. 

No sooner had I deposited my 

ttle loaf on a colorful doily than 

observed an army of ants had 

assed the word along and had 

ttempted to reach my entry before 

le judges had a chance. 

The ant battalion was so numer- 

us in such a short time that, if I 

ad decided to take some of them 

ome to introduce to my own ants, 

ley wouldn't have been missed. 



THE ENORMOUS working space was 
a veritable hive of industry, agog with 
everyone lovingly primping their respec- 
tive entries to their full potential, like 
children being dressed in their best for a 
party. Determined entrants frantically 
hovered over their fancy hors d'oeuvres, 
encouragingly moistened their exciting 
entries and daintily decorated their exotic 
desserts — a blob of whipped cream here, a 
glace cherry there. 

There were Tuna Spuds reaching heights 
no tuna could ever have imagined. Also, 



Beach Blanket Abalone, confortably 
arranged, Baked Running Feathers, Zuc- 
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One contestant was so secretive about 
her entry, and she kept her contribution so 
well concealed, that I never did find out 
what it was or whether she won anything. 
Another finalist, who won several prizes 
(and who would have thought to enter 
three or four recipes?), had also brought 
along a Macadamia Nut Cake, which 
somehow or other completely disappeared 
before it had a chance to be judged. It 



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CRANBERRIES January 1989 Page 13 



never was located. 

In an attempt to keep up with the winners, 
I discovered that the Stuffed Turkey Roll 
in Egg Roll Wrappers easily took first 
prize in the poultry category. The Choco- 
late Frangelico Cheesecake easily won 
first place among the desserts and the 
Tree Trunk Cake brought up the rear. 

I can authentically vouch for the judges' 
fairness, as they continued to cautiously 
sip sodas and crunch crackers between 
mouthfuls to revive their taste buds for 
the next delicacy. It must have been 
extremely difficult selecting winners from 
the numerous magnificent entries. 

If there had been a booby prize, I might 
have been eligible. Though I didn't get 
anywhere with my, by now, withered look- 
ing loaf, I certainly didn't regret entering. 

It didn't take me long to realize that 
submitting a loaf of fruited bread as a des- 
sert was a no-no. Also, it certainly should 
have been accompanied with a sunny pat 
of sweet, creamy butter to enhance the del- 
icate flavor, as is intended in the recipe. 

Having mingled with the experienced 
contestants and sampled their original 
creations, I learned that everyone is usu- 
ally at a disadvantage the first time 
around. But I have had a golden opportun- 
ity to learn firsthand what is required in a 
cooking contest. 



For starters, one should never consider 
entering an item that hasn't been success- 
fully rehearsed several times previously. 

At the close of the contest, we were all 
thanked warmly for our efforts and allowed 
to rescue any remains. When we were all 
packed up and the kitchens restored to 
law and order, the celebrants and losers 
thinned out onto the lawn and returned to 



their everyday activities until next year 
Will I be there? You bet I will. I'm now 

full fledged cooking contestant and wis 

in the ways of the judges' requirements. 
After all, if nothing else, at least th 

ants were partial to my Cranberry, Almon 

and Walnut Loaf. Why else would the; 

have come charging after it the moment 

laid it down? 



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Page 14 CRANBERRIES January 1989 



Contending With the Problems 
In a Family Business 



By JOSEPH ARKIN 

Siblings fight. Best friends 
disagree. Spats bruise the happ- 
est marriage. So, it should come 
as no surprise that personal con- 
flicts arise in closely held family 
businesses. 

However, conflicts in family 

businesses involve more than 

I egos and emotions. Such conflicts 

:an have serious financial 

consequences. 

Simple family disagreements 
1 Decome distractions that absorb 
valuable management time and 
mergy. More severe conflicts can 
ead to disruptions that damage 
iales and reduce a family firm's 
earnings. In extreme circum- 
stances, family conflicts can 
•reate disturbances that threaten 
i firm's survival. Being right 
an become more important than 
jeing successful. 

No panaceas exist for avoid- 
n g conflicts in family businesses. 
\nd family disagreements often 
•esist common solutions. But 
•ecognizing some basic consid- 




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erations can help reduce the fre- 
quency and severity of family 
conflicts. 

To orient our look at those 
considerations, we first will 
separate the potential conflicts 
in family businesses into the fol- 
lowing categories: 

1. Non-business conflicts that 
affect the business; 

2. Problems arising from 
dispersed management control; 

3. Problems dealing with inac- 
tive shareholders; 

4. Problems dealing with non- 
family members in the business; 

5. Transition problems, i.e., 
replacing top management. 

The different categories may 



overlap. And some of the prob- 
lems in family businesses really 
do not arise from personal con- 
flicts. But focusing on the above 
categories helps orient the 
discussion. 

Problems arising from personal 
conflicts may be the most diffi- 
cult to solve. Such conflicts often 
bear only an indirect relation- 
ship to business activities. Yet 
they often arise from deep seated 
emotions that resist rational 
solutions. 

A brief scenario provides an 
example of such problems. 

The Mellow Company is a 
family held concern that oper- 
ates successfully in several states. 





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CRANBERRIES January 1989 Page 15 



The founder remains in firm 
control of the business. He has 
three sons active in the opera- 
tion. One functions as sales 
manager, a second serves as 
controller, while the third is a 
plant supervisor. 

Although all three sons receive 
generous compensation, their 
varying responsibilities still 
introduce differences in their pay. 
Those small differences allow 
one family to enjoy a few more of 
life's amenities than the other 
two. And the remaining two also 
have somewhat varying lifestyles 
stemming from the differences 
in income. 

However minor they appear, 
the differences in income and 
lifestyles provide the seeds for 
discontent. Irrational jealously 
takes precedence over reason. 
Demands for equal pay for 
unequal contributions create 
family discord that threatens to 
damage the Mellow Company's 
success. Irrational personal dif- 
ferences become a business 
problem. 

One solution may come from 
allowing dissident family 
members to assume responsibil- 
ities for specific profit centers. 
Their income then can be par- 
tially related to the profit cen- 



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ter's performance. 

The specific profit center may 
be oriented towards a new or 
existing market area. Or perhaps 
a new business can be estab- 
lished that moves the firm into a 
new field. 

Whatever the approach, such 
moves shift the question of com- 
pensation differences away from 
emotional issues. Family 
members can't quibble as much 
when their measurable per- 
formance becomes an important 
influence in the compensation 
issue. 

Of course, expansion into new 
markets or new fields may not 
stand as a feasible alternative. 
The firm may lack the necessary 
financing capability. Or the dis- 
sident family members may lack 
the ability to manage a separate 
profit center. 

In other instances, personal 
differences may preclude a reas- 
onable solution. Minor family 
disagreements can grow into 
bitter, irreconcilable disputes. 

In such circumstances, busi- 
ness survival should stand as 



[i 



the most prominent concern. That jfn 
may require separating the dis 
sident family members from the 
business. 

If the dissidents lack any 
ownership interest the separa- 
tion process is straightforward. 
The dissidents simply gain the s 
opportunity to seek employment i 
elsewhere. 

However, in many instances, 
dissident family members also 
own an equity interest in the'i 
business. To avoid rekindling a 
disputes in the future, the dissi- 
dents should sell their interests 
in the business. 

Again, one approach is ; 
straightforward. The dissidents : 
can sell their shares directly to : 
those remaining active in the : 
business. That leaves the busi- 
ness entity uninvolved in the i 
financial transaction. 

However, in many circum- 
stances, the company must buy 
out the departing shareholders, 
The company may pay cash foi t: 
the shares. Or a long term paj 
out may be arranged. 

In any event, the buy out shoulc 



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Page 16 CRANBERRIES January 1989 




177 



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lot severely upset the firm's 
l^^inancial circumstances. 

! Burdensome obligations left from 
buy outs can threaten a firm's 
survival. 

Indeed, if a burdensome buy 
3ut represents the only feasible 
settlement, selling the whole 
Dusiness to a third party may 
aecome more desirable. The bus- 
ness survives. And the family 
:an enjoy the financial settle- 

hnent, if not the continuing 

] Denefits from ownership. 

The second category of prob- 

t ems in family owned business 
ioesn't necessarily involve any 

! iirect personal conflicts. Instead, 
he problems center on efforts to 
ind an effective approach to 

1 nanaging the business. 

: In this instance, we assume 

1 hat several family members are 
ictively involved in day-to-day 

: nanagement activities. Yet no 

: lingle family member, nor any 

i amily group, enjoys majority 

[ -ontrol of the business. 

3 The absence of extreme family 
lisputes doesn't preclude prob- 



lems in such circumstances. The 
family still must develop an 
approach to managing the busi- 
ness successfully, while avoid- 



ing discord. Some sensible 
guidelines can help orient that 
effort. 
First, even though no one has 



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Tel. (508) 746-6048 



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CRANBERRIES January 1989 Page 17 



majority control, one or more 
family members must assume 
leadership positions. Effective 
leadership then replaces the 
authority and influence typically 
exhibited by a controlling 
manager. 

Effective leadership involves 
all the active family members in 
the significant business planning 
and decision processes. That 
involvement can develop through 
various management committees. 
Or it may rely on less formal 
arrangements. Whatever the 
form, active involvement 
encourges the teamwork neces- 
sary to work for the best inter- 
ests of the business enterprise, 
which also serves the family's 
interests. 

Effective leadership involves 
all the active family members in 
the significant business planning 
and decision processes. That 
involement can develop through 
various management committees. 
Or it may rely on less formal 
arrangements. Whatever the 
form, active involvement 
encourges the teamwork neces- 
sary to work for the best inter- 
ests of the business enterprise, 
which also serves the family's 
interests. 

Effective leadership also 
ensures that open lines of com- 
munication prevail among all 
the family members involved in 
management. Apparent secrecy 
of any kind plants the seeds of 
discontent. Not every family 



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member can have his way. But 
every active member must feel 
involved. 

Lastly, whenever possible, 
management tasks and respon- 
sibilities should be spread among 
family members in a manner 
that reduces the potential for 
disputes arising from overlapping 
concerns. Clear lines of author- 
ity and established responsibili- 
ties contribute towards that 
objective. Leaving responsibili- 
ties unclear increases the poten- 
tial for unnecessary disputes. 

The third category of problems 
that commonly arise in family 
owned business involves inactive 
members. Although inactive, 
these family members typically 



feel that their ownership inter- ^ 
ests entitle, them to share in the 
firm's earnings through periodic 
dividend payments. Knowing 
that active family members enjoy 
generous compensation from the 
business only intensifies those 
feelings. 

The demand for dividends may 
be complicated by the firm's own 
financing needs. The business 
may have a bona fide need to 
retain its earnings to fuel con 
tinuing growth. 

In such instances, the firm's 
best interests should prevail 
Active members should try to 
prove the firm's need to retain 
earnings. Certainly, the longer 
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Page 18 CRANBERRIES January 1989 



serves everyone's best interests. 

Alternatively, the business may 

periodically pay stock dividends 

to the firm's shareholders. Those 

i shareholders needing cash may 
5nd other family members wil- 
' ing to buy their dividend shares. 
The inactive shareholders 

' ichieve their aims without 
Iraining cash from the business. 
As another alternative, a bus- 
ness may spin off one or more 
profit centers into new corpora- 
ions. The earnings from those 
orporations then can be dedi- 
!ated to dividend payments to 
;hareholders. Even modest 
lividends may placate the inac- 

• ive shareholders. 

' Involving non-family members 
n management creates another 
ategory of problems for family 
lusinesses. That involvement is 
mavoidable. Few businesses can 
ill every important management 
lot with talented family 
tiembers. 

At the same time, retaining 
alented executives in a family 
lusiness often becomes a prob- 
em. Non-family executives 

I amain outsiders. They may be 
nvolved in the family business, 
•ut they can't become part of the 
amily . The potential for moving 
ito the chief executive's role — a 
latural ambition for a talented 
manager — may be stymied by 

,- he presence of a family member 
/ith the same objective and sim- 
ar talents. 

Moreover, talented managers 
ypically want to gain an equity 
nterest in the business that 
njoys fruits of their talents. That 
Iso can become a problem if the 
^amily members are reluctant to 
ilute their ownership positions. 
Despite the obstacles, a con- 
sientious effort can help a fam- 
y business retain valuable 
xecutives brought in from 
utside. 

First, use the manager's talents. 
lake him part of the team. Give 
im responsibilities and author- 
y appropriate for his position 
nd ability. Then, allow him to 
sercise those responsibilities 
dthout undue interference. 
Second, insure that the execu- 




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CRANBERRIES January 1989 Page 19 



tive enjoys compensation 
appropriate for his position. That 
should include the salary and 
other benefits that have become 
the norm in successful 
businesses. 

However, the compensation 
also should include visible 
benefits that provide compensa- 
tion for the executive's ego. A 
company car, a large, comforta- 
ble office, and other niceties can 
make up for many of the limita- 
tions the executive finds in the 
family business. 

If the desire for an equity posi- 
tion remains an issue, forming a 
separate corporation may provide 
a solution. The business may 
spin off a profit center as a 
separate corporation. The non- 
family executive than may be 
rewarded with a share of the separate 
entity. 

Alternatively, a separate cor- 
poration may be established to 
move into new markets or to 
move into entirely new fields. 
With the support of the existing 
business, such concerns have a 
larger probability for success 
than typical new ventures. 
Moreover, they can provide an 
equity interest for valuable non- 
family executives. 

If no potential for equity inter- 
ests exists, then the business 
should attempt to develop some 
deferred compensation plans that 
provide important non-family 



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executives with long term finan- 
cial security. That security can 
provide the executive with the 
confidence to pursue his own 
ventures as sidelines, while still 
devoting the bulk of his talents 
to the business. 

The last category of problems 
in families arises from the need 
to make transitions at the top 
management level from one 



generation to the next. The sev 
erity of the problems naturally. « 
will vary with the circumstances.il 
In fortvmate circumstances, the|ii 
senior executive recognizes the 
need to turn the reins over to a 
youngerfamily member. Ideally, 
one member — perhaps an only 
son — stands out among his peers. 
All recognize his succession as 
most beneficial for the business. 



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Crowley $4,000 a ton 

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Page 20 CRANBERRIES January 1989 



Providing time for a training 

riod adds the final touch to 
iiese ideal circumstances. The 
enior manager turns the reins 
ver gradually. He allows his 
uccessor to make his own mis- 
akes. Yet he gently provides 
uidance when it becomes 
tecessary. The successor grows 
tito the job. He gains the confi- 
ence of his peers and himself, 
md the senior executive backs 
ut of the business in an orderly 
my to happily pursue avocations 
Teviously set aside in favor of 
tie family business. 

Unfortunately, these ideal cir- 
umstances are uncommon, 
everal complications make 
rderly succession more difficult 
J achieve. 

One complication develops 
hen more than one potential 
accessor exits. Two or more sons 
Dmmonly are active in family 
usinesses. When the father elects 
) retire, the succession decision 
isily can create a family furor. 

However, the top executive still 
hould select his successor, 
eaving the decision to the next 



generation inevitably creates 
dissension that may be painful 
to those concerned and damag- 
ing to the business. 

In some instances, the selec- 
tion process may be easy for the 
retiring executive. He can make 
his choice known early, and then 
proceed through the transition 
outlined above. 

However, when the choice 
among peers isn't obvious, the 
top manager should consult with 
objective observers familiar with 
the firm's circumstances. 
Bankers, accountants, attorneys, 
suppliers, and even customers 
may provide insight that isn't 
obvious to the one responsible 
for the decision. 

In any event, upon selecting 
his successor, the retiring excu- 
tive should take steps to prevent 
conflicts among family members. 
The expedient use of titles can 
help appearances and sooth some 
damaged egos. 

For example, the business may 
have, or form, subsidiaries that 
each have a President's title. 
Ultimate responsibiUty may rest 




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YANKEE 
PLANNERS, 
INC. 

59 North Main Street 

Middleboro, MA 02346 

(508) 947-0527 



Sound and Objective 

Advice 

Suited to 

Your Needs 



• Tax and Estate Planning 

• Investment & Insurance 

Review 

• Business Continuity 

• Asset Protection 

• Key Employee Retention 

• Business Tax Analysis 



Mr, William H. Bestgen, Jr. 

Chartered Financial Consultant 



Mr. Peter W. Hutchings 

Attorney at Law practicing as 
a Tax Attorney 



Mr. Roger H. Parent, Jr. 

Accountant, Enrolled to Practice 

before the Internal Revenue 

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in the hands of the President of 
the parent firm. But the titles 
can help discourage family dis- 
sent during a transition period. 
The most difficult transition 
problem arises when the manag- 
ing founder fails to see the need 
to turn the firm's reins over to 
the next generation. 



That need may be apparent to 
those inside and outside the firm. 
The founder may be an obstacle 
to further expansion or critical 
changes necessary to keep the 
business competitive. Or the 
founder simply may rely on 
archaic management methods 
that are cumbersome in the 




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land development: evaluation, purchase, survey, 
design, permit acquisition, phased construction and 
planting both in wetlands and uplands. 

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Contact: Will Lee 

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Wisconsin Rapids, Wl 54494 

(715)424-3131 



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$2,500 a ton 
$3,500 a ton 



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R.M. Lawton Cranberries, Inc. 

221 Thomas St. 

Middleboro, MA 02346 

(508) 947-7465 



Page 22 CRANBERRIES January 1989 



Modern era marked by electronic 
:)mmunication. Or the founder 
imply may be out of touch with 
rapidly changing business 
nvironment. 

Obviously, encouraging re- 
rement in such instances is a 
elicate task. After all, the exec- 
tive undoubtedly played an 
nportant role in the firm's past 
iccesses. He typically expects 
•edit and respect for that role, 
aising questions about a suc- 
?ssor is more likely to raise his 
e than encourage his retirement. 
What is the solution to this del- 
ate problem? 

Try reasoning with the execu- 
ve. Attempt persuasion. Entice 
ith the pleasures expected from 
tirement years unburdened by 
isiness pressures. 
Proceed cautiously. Proceed 
urefully. And hope that one 
i jproach or another eventually 
ill prevail. 

What alternatives exists if all 
( forts fail and the founder per- 
ists in office? 

Probably none. Forcing the 
isue will make the executive 
^ en more steadfast in his com- 
I 



mitment to stay. The only solu- 
tion may come from backing off 
and letting time prevail. 

That alternative may not serve 
the firm's immediate best inter- 
ests. But it represents another 
illustration of the key element in 
the solutions to many of the 
problems that arise in family 



businesses. 

Indeed, a workable comprom- 
ise often takes precedence over 
the best solution to a problem. 
Although it may not maximize 
the firm's earnings, the ability to 
compromise may be the key to a 
family firm's long term survival. 

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$3,500.00 per ton 
$3,500.00 per ton 
$3,500.00 per ton 
$4,000.00 per ton 



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Contact: 
LeRoy Miles 

Northland Cranberries, Inc. 
(715) 424-4444 
251 Oak Street 
Wisconsin Rapids, W 54494 



i 



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CRANBERRIES January 1989 Page 23 



Take Good 

Care of Yourself 

Have an Ocean Spray! 



'. 




The farmer's cooperative that brings you 
a wide range of natural fruit juices, drinks and sauces 

Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc., Plymouth, Massachusetts 02360 
An Equal Opportunity Employer 




CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

February 1989 , ,_ ^ Vol. 53. No. 2 

urn. 0, ;.;^53_ 




New Ocean Spray Home 
- oo-op and Feds Settle 



JO 

jpth 

3et of 

ghting 



Recipes & [ 



i masking 
rooms bear 
.stry, such as 

£00 TO js, Howes and 

isy 

AviHv,oT-> <-i'='^'^ S~lv!iat caps off the 
-lu gj,gj miles away. 

)— the new^ head- 



ibruary 1989 Page 3 








serving 

Massachusetts 
cranberry 
Growers 

John C. Decas 

DECRAN AG SUPPLIES INC. 

219 Main St. 

Wareham, MA 02571 



*Complete line of cranberry pesticides, fertilizers, miticides. In 
stock when you want them. 

*Quality aerial applications. 

*Best application and safety equipment for your needs. 

*Proven frost warning equipment. Don't take cfiances— buy the 
best. 

*Experienced cranberry consulting service offering pheromone 
traps and baits. 

*Sanding by hielicopter. 

*Culvert P;pe— All sizes— steel and aluminum. 

■kDitch Mud Mafs— Strong— ligfitweigfit— durable. 

* Burlap Picking Bags — Best for your money. 



Contact 



office: 295-0147 

evening: 763-8956 

(William Chamberlain) 




evrinol. 



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"ranbemes. 



With gentle protection, DEVRINOL® 
10-G herbicide provides broad-spec- 
trum weed control of over 40 broadleaf 
v^eeds and grasses, including nutsedge. 
DEVRINOL gives you long-lasting control 
throughout the seasoa And it's easy to 
apply-on the ground or in the air. 

For more information, see your dealer 
or call the ICI Information Line: 
1-800-759-2500. 

Always read and follow label directions 
carefully 



©IW^DM® 



I rsey only See label for specific recommendations ) 

ES February 1989 




Ocean Spray's 'Camelot' 




ANOTHER VIEW of the sprawling headquarters, which is situated on 310 acres in the heart 
of Massachusetts cranberry country. 

(Photo by Jeff Rundell, Ocean Spray) 



By CAROLYN GILMORE 
Ocean Spray's new headquarters— truly a 
Camelot in appearance and design— was 
jinveiled recently at tAvo open houses for res- 
idents and officials of surrounding tow^ns 
nd the cooperative's member grow^ers. 
John S. Llewellyn, the cooperative's pres- 
ient and CEO, called the headquarters "a 
reenhouse, not a w^arehouse, for new^ ideas, 
lethods and actions." 



COVER PHOTO 

AN AERIAL VIEW of Ocean Spray's 
new^, crescent shaped headquarters in 
Middleboro-Lakeville, Mass. The build- 
ing combines a colonial appearance with 
modern corporate needs. A story about 
the cooperative's sparkling new^ edifice 
begins on this page. 

(Photo by Jeff Rundell, Ocean Spray) 



The three-level, crescent-shaped building, 
of Federal Colonial design, is situated on a 
310 acre site at the Middleboro-Lakeville, 
Mass., line. Located "in the heart of cran- 
berry country," it is only 17 miles from the 
facility it outgrew in Plymouth. 

The show^case headquarters curves around 
Poquoy Pond and a knoll. Its more than 300 
arched and rectangular windows and a depth 
of only 80 feet in its 165,000 square feet of 
office space insure plenty of natural lighting 
and views for all offices. 

The main building has a sound masking 
system and numerous conference rooms bear 
names well known to the industry, such as 
Makepeace, Ben Lear, Searles, Howes and 
McFarlin. 

A copper roofed cupola that caps off the 
edifice can be seen from several miles aw^ay. 

One Ocean Spray Drive— the new head- 

CRANBERRIES February 1989 Page 3 



quarters address— includes a working bog 
with a surrounding pond. The Agriculture 
Research Center incorporates an early ISOO's 
Cape designed building with two 28 foot 
greenhouses for the growth and study of 
cranberry plants. 



In addition to the natural surroundings, 
there are 16 acres of landscaping, which 
include dogw^ood, sycamore, birch, maple 
and oak trees. Native cranberry bushes, 
several species of rhododendron and peren- 
nial flowers promise a full season of blooms. 



CRANBERRY 

GROWERS 

REALTY 

Listings of buyers and 

sellers welcomed on 

cranberry acreage 

and upland. 

Appraisals 

DOUGLAS R. BEATON 

E. Sandwich, Mass 

02537 

(617) 888-1288 



Massachusetts Groivers 

Financial assistance is available for SCHOLARSHIPS and MEDICAL 
ASSISTANCE for Cranberry Growers, their Employees and the 
families of both when financial need can be shown. For information 
contact: 

URANN FOUNDATION 
P.O.Box 1788 
Brockton MA 02403 

Telephone 588-7744 




CASORON 4G 

Effective control of broadleafs and grasses. 

If you're looking for a way to control tough weeds, 
your choice should be Casoron 4G. It's effective 
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grasses, it's economical, and comes 
in easy-to-use granular form. 



UNIROYAL 
CHEMICAL 



Casoron is a Reg. TM of 
Uniroyal Chemical Company, Inc 

Please read and follow all 
label instructions carefully. 



Page 4 CRANBERRIES February 1989 




Ocean Spray Pays $400,000 Fine 



Waste Disposal Controversy Settled 



By CAROLYN GILMORE 

"Tough and costly but fair." 
That's how John S. Llewellyn 
Jr., president of Ocean Spray, 
described the federal court action 
Dec. 20 in which the cooperative 
paid fines of $400,000 after pleading 
guilty to charges of releasing 
cranberry peelings and processing 
wastewater into the Middleborough, 
Mass., sewer system and the 
Nemasket River. 

Llewellyn called the settlement 
'a warning to all conscientous 

i corporations of the need to comply 
'uUy with environmental regula- 
lions." 

The Ocean Spray president said 
le regrets the incidents that led to 
he court case and accepts personal 
■esponsibility for them. He added 
hat "at no time was there any 
langer to public health, in the period 
n question." 

The period in question was 1983 
1987. The cooperative was indicted 
n January 1988 on 78 counts — 



RANBERRIES 

HE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

SEND CORRESPONDENCE TO: 

P.O. BOX 249 

COBALT CT 06414 

(203) 342-4730 

PUBLISHER & EDITOR: BOB TAYLOR 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: CAROLYN GILMORE 
(508) 763-5206 

I3VIS0RS & CORRESPONDENTS 

1ASSACHUSETTS - Irving E. Demoranville. 
fCtor, Cranberry Experiment Station 
lEW JERSEY — Phillip E. Marucci, Cranberry & Blueberry 
iciallst, Buddtown; Elizabetti G Carpenter, Ctiatsworth 
OVA SCOTIA — Robert A Murray. Horticulturist, Berry 
ps. Researcti Station, Truro 

REGON — Arthur Poole, Coos County Extension Agent, 
luille. 

'ASHINGTON — Azmi Y, Shawa. Horticulturist and 
Bnsion Agent in Horticulture. Coastal Washington 
learch & Extension Unit, Long Beach. 
1SC0NSIN — Tod D Planer, Farm Management Agent, 
3d County 

kNBERRIES It published monthly by DIvertllled Perlodl- 
Wallwyn Drive, Portland CT 06480. Second clasi pol- 
ls paid at the Portland, Conn. Poll OHIce. Price li $1 5 a 
, $28 lor two yean. $2 a copy In the U.S.; $17 a year In 
ada; $20 a year In all other countriei. Back coplei: $2.S0, 
iding poitage. Copyright 1 988 by DIverellled Periodical!. 

ISSN: 0011.0787 

Poitmaiter, lend Form 3749 to: 

CRANBERRIES 

P.O. BOX 249 

COBALT CT 06414 



including six felony charges — of 
violating the federal Clean Water 
Act. Ocean Spray pleaded innocent 
to the charges, which could have 
brought fines as high as $2. 1 million. 

The Clean Water Act was £imended 
in 1987 to make it a felony to dis- 
charge raw waste material into 
sewers. Ocean Spray became the 
first company charged with a fel- 
ony under the amended act. 

Under a plea agreement accepted 
by U.S. District Court Judge David 
S. Nelson, 57 of the charges, includ- 
ing the six felony counts, were 
dropped. In addition to the fines, 
Ocean Spray has agreed to buy a 
sludge press worth more than 
$100,000 for the Middleborough 
sewer plant. 

Middleborough had claimed that 
the acidic quality of the processing 
discharges was inhibiting bacterial 
action in the sewer plant. 

"I'm thrilled to death," John 
Healey, Middleborough's town 
manager, told the Boston Globe 
after the settlement. He said he's 
convinced that the company was 
not aware of the impact of the dis- 
charges on the town's sewer system. 

Ocean Spray says that since 1986 



it has spent or is committed to 
spend more than $5 million on 
equipment "to meet and exceed 
environmental requirements." An 
Ocean Spray spokeswoman said 
the treatment equipment at the 
new Kenosha, Wise, receiving sta- 
tion, for example, "is state of the 
art." 

Since 1987, the cooperative has 
been under orders by Massachu- 
setts to develop a pretreatment sys- 
tem to process waste at its Middle- 
borough plant. Plans are expected 
to be approved by the state soon 
and the pretreatment facilities are 
expected to be operational by the 
next harvest. 

In a press statement following 
the court decision, Michael R. 
Deland, regional administrator for 
the Environmental Protection 
Agency, said Ocean Spray has been 
■'working cooperatively" with his 
agency, the state Department of 
Environmental Quality Engineer- 
ing and the town of Middleborough. 

Robert D. Keefe, Ocean Spray 
attorney, said the cooperative "cares 
deeply about the environment 
because cranberries rely on land 
and water." 




CRANBERRIES February 1989 Page 5 




All's Veil That Ends Well 



Corporate astuteness might properly describe the way John 
S. Llewellyn Jr. reacted to the paddling Ocean Spray took in 
federal court Dec. 20. 

Mealy-mouthedness, petty carping so often follow adverse 
findings. The cooperative president would have none of that. 

"Tough" but "fair" he said of the settlement. 

Putting the whole matter into a wider perspective, he said the 
case serves as "a warning to all conscientous corporations of 
the need to comply fully with environmental regulations." 

Ocean Spray has spent — or is about to spend — a total of $5 
million to treat processing wastes. When everything is in place, 
the cooperative might well serve as a model of corporate 
responsibility. 

Without in any way justifying the smallest act of environ- 
mental carelessness, we can't help but note the irony that this 
first case brought under the amended Clean Water Act did not 
involve toxic wastes. In our meanderings up and down some of 
the waterways in the Northeast— the Connecticut River, for 
example— we have seen untreated discharges that look consid- 
erably more threatening than cranberry peelings. 

The answer to why Ocean Spray became a target might be 
implicit in a remark by U.S. Attorney Frank McNamara, who 
said the cooperative's prosecution "was necessary to force a 
powerful Fortune 500 company to cease its history of pollution." 

When you're big — and well known — you sometimes have to 
pay a price. 

Be that as it may, everything has ended well. 

The town of Middleborough has valuable new waste treat- 
ment equipment. Ocean Spray took a paddling but penalties 
might have been considerably stiffer. And EPA has a prece- 
dent in its books with which it can go after some really danger- 
ous offenders. 

Ocean Spray is well rid of the case. Its energies and resources 
can now be concentrated on maintaining an uncompromised 
environmentally sound image. And such an image is crucial to 
the welfare of the industry. 




YANKEE 
PLANNERS, 
INC. 

59 North Main Street 

Middleboro, MA 02346 

(508) 947-0527 



Sound and Objective 

Advice 

Suited to 

Your Needs 



• Tax and Estate Planning 

• Investment & Insurance 

Review 

• Business Continuity 

• Asset Protection 

• Key Employee Retention 

• Business Tax Analysis 



Mr. William H. Bestgen, Jr. 

Chartered Financial Consultant 



Mr. Peter W. Hutchings 

Attorney at Law practicing as 
a Tax Attorney 



Mr. Roger H. Parent, Jr. 

Accountant, Enrolled to Practice 

before the Internal Revenue 

Service 



Call For Your Free Brochure 

(508) 947-0527 



Page 6 CRANBERRIES February 1989 



Juice Companies Call For 
'Full Disclosure' Labeling 



By CAROLYN GILMORE 

Fruit juice companies represent- 

'ing more than 30 percent of the 

industry have joined Ocean Spray 

in calling for "full disclosure" 

labeling on all fruit and vegetable 

(juices. 
This effort could help resolve a 
15-year controversy over what 
consumers should be told about 
fruit juice content. 

The National Food Processors 
Association announced in December 
it will petition the federal Food & 
Drug Administration (FDA) to drop 
a proposal requiring percentage juice 
labeling in favor of another rule to 
nclude declaration of nutritional 
abeling along with total juice 
content. 



The proposal is sought by Ocean 
Spray Cranberries as an alterna- 
tive to the percentage labeling rule 
which has been pending before the 
FDA in one form or another for 15 
years. 

A task force of eight juice mak- 
ers, including Ocean Spray, met in 
San Francisco in December to try 
to resolve the controversy. This 
marks the first time juice compan- 
ies have endorsed the full disclo- 
sure concept. 

The other companies are: Del 
Monte, National Fruit Product Co. 
Inc., General Foods (owners of 
Kool-Aid), Tree Top Inc., Clement 
Pappas & Co., Dole Package Foods 
and Campbell Soup Co. Together 
they represent more than 30 per- 



cent of juice sales nationally, 
according to Ellen Morton of the 
600-member National Food 
Producers Association. 

The association's labeling plan 
would feature: 

• a petition to the FDA to require 
makers of both diluted and 100 per- 
cent juice beverages to list juice 
content on the container; 

• legislation in Congress to change 
the federal Food, Drug & Cosmetic 
Act to require full nutritional label- 
ing on all juice products. 

Currently manufacturers must list 
nutritional data only if they make 
a specific nutritional claim or if 
nutrients are added. 



! 



K Ag Laboratories International, Inc. 

2323 Jackson Street 
Oshkosh, Wl 54901 

* Cranberry Soil Analysis 

* Cranberry Vine Analysis 

* Cranberry Water Analysis, 
Usage & Interpretation 

* Liquid & Dry Fertilizer 
Recommendation 

* Soil Problems & Consultation 

* Seminars 

* Cranberry Crop Monitoring 
Program, testing and 
monitoring nutrient status 
with 30 day intervals during 
during the growing season. 



Serving Cranberry 
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Over 20 years 
of Experience on 
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K Ag Laboratory has 
run over 30,000 



cranberry soil and over 
17,500 cranberry vines 
tests since 1984, and 
gave fertilizer 
recommendations with 
great success. 



Highly computerized cranberry soil, tissue and water testing program in 
U.S.A. and Canada. 

For more information contact: Dr. Akhtar Khwaja, Ph.D. 

Certifled Profeseional Soil Scientist 
Certifled Professional Agronomist 

Phone Number 414-426-2220; Out of Wl 1-800-356-6045; FAX 414-426-2222 



I 

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CRANBERRIES February 1989 Page 7 



I^EGICNAL 
NCTES 

MASSACHUSETTS 

By IRVING E. DEMORANVILLE 

Unofficially, the Massachusetts crop appears 
to be about 1 ,900,000 barrels, which is 4 per- 
cent above the August estimate and some- 
what over 30 percent larger than the 1987 
crop. 



The Christmas Light Festival at Edavllle 
Railroad In South Carver this year featured 30 
holiday scenes and 200,000 lights. The attrac- 
tion provides a SV2 mile railroad ride through 
an 1,800 acre cranberry plantation. 

WASHINGTON 

Millie DeFord's Cranberry House in Long 
Beach, Wash., features homemade cranberry 
fudge. Millie mails the fudge— with or without 
nuts— all over the country. 

>Veather 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Mow c mb er was warm and wet. Tempera- 
tures averaged 1.6 degrees a day above 




0^^^^ 



Equipment, inc. 



381 West Grove St. (Rte. 28) 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

(508) 947-6299 

^KUBOTR 

Tractors, Excavators and 
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Wheel Loaders 
3/4 Yd - 6 1/2 Yd 




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normal. Maximum temperature was 66 
degrees on the 5th and the minimum was 21 
degrees on the 23rd. 

Rainfall totaled 8.55 inches or about 4 
inches above normal. This was the third 
largest in our records, the most since 1945 
and 1944. There was measurable precipita- 



tion on 11 days, with 2.88 inches on the 
27th-28th as the greatest storm. We are 
about an inch above normal for the year 
and the same amount ahead of 1987. 

There was no measurable snowfall— not 
unusual. 

I.E.D. 



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Ifti^stion Supplies 

• 2 " to 12" PVC Pipe with Fittings 

• Quick Couple Risers 

• Felker Aluminum Flumes & Culverts 

Replace old aluminum mains with government approved 4", 6" 
and 8 " polyethylene pipe buried just below bog surface. No insert 
fittings. Rent our butt fusion welder for a continuous main line. Beat 
the high cost of custom installation by renting our small 4-wheel 
drive tractor with mole hole plow for buried laterals. 

STEARNS IRRIGATION, INC. 

790 Federal Furnace Rd. 

Plymouth MA 02360 

Tel. (508) 746-6048 



i^*^'^^*^*^^^^^*^*^*^^^^*****^^***^*^**^**^^^^^*'^*^**'^'^ 






31: 
31: 



Early Blacks 

Stevens 

Howes 



Crowley 



$2,500 a ton 
$4,000 a ton 
$2,500 a ton 
$3,500 a ton 



PncQS F.O.B. 



R.M. Lawton Cranberries, Inc. 

221 Thomas St. 

Middleboro, MA 02346 

(508) 947-7465 



i 
I 

i 



Page 8 CRANBERRIES February 1989 



Sjty=^oa/ 0w4te^ ^i4t^ 








LORRAINE CARR displays the numerous ribbons, 
the rosette and the silver tray she won in the 1988 
Make It Better With Cranberries cooking contest. 

(CRANBERRIES photo by Carolyn Gilmore) 




WISCONSIN CRANBERRY 
HEADQUARTERS FOR 
SEVINXLR 



DEVRINOL 10G ♦ EVITAL * GUTHION 
DIAZINON 14G ♦ PARATHION « ETHREL 

Cole/Grow^er Service 

537 Atlas Ave., P.O. Box 721 1 , Madison, Wl 53707 
(608) 221-6204 or 1-800-362-8049 



By CAROLYN GILMORE 

Lorraine Carr of Rochester, 
Mass., who formerly owned a bog 
with her husband, proved not only 
once but many times that she can 
"make it better with cranberries." 

Mrs. Carr won best of show for 
her Cranberry Almond Creme Pie 
in the 12th annual "Make It Better 
With Cranberries" cooking contest 
held Oct. 1. 

She also won first prizes for pies, 
cookies, muffins and bars and 
squares. And she landed seconds 
in dessert cakes, breads, coffee cakes 



O Gapen 

Realty & Insurance 



Knowledge & ability to 

unite buyers and sellers 

for existing marshes or 

undeveloped land. 

2141 8th street South 

Wisconsin Rapids, 

Wisconsin 54494 

(715)423-6550 

[H -Els <^ 

REALTOR mWwm^ OPPORIUHTY 



VINES FOR SALE 



Howes and 
Early Blacks 



CALL 



(617)428-6101 

Or 

(617)428-0907 

After 6 p.m. 



CRANBERRIES February 1989 Page 9 



and other creative ways of using 
cranberries in everyday cooking 

The contest was sponsored by 
the Cape Cod Cranberry Growers 
Association, the Massachusetts 
Department of Food and Agricul- 
ture and the Cranberry World Vis- 
itors Center. Grower Dorothy 
Angley, assisted by Charlene 
Lawson, organized and produced 
the event this year. 

Mrs. Csirr sdso was a heavy winner 
in the 1986 contest, in which her 
Cranberry Pineapple Pie captured 
first prize. 

"I love cranberries," Mrs. Carr 
said. "I find them easy to adapt to a 
variety of uses." 

Besides cranberry cooking con- 
tests, the Rochester woman has a 
long record of successes in other 
cooking contests, including a cat- 
fish cooking contest in 1986 that 
won her a trip down South. She 
also won The (New Bedford, Mass.) 
Standard Times Cooking Contest 
in 1988. She will join the judging 
team for the 1989 cranberry cook- 
ing contest. 

"I'm a better cook on paper," she 
said. "In the kitchen, I'm average. 
Everything I cook is easy." 



For Mrs. Carr, "taste is the most 
important" recipe ingredient, closely 
followed by appearance. An artist 
by training, she runs a thriving 
crafts business, for which she hand- 
crafts such items as dolls, pillows 
and stenciled rugs. 

Another first prize winner was 
Irene Varecchia of Riverside, Rhode 



Island, who took the awards in the | 
cranberry dessert cakes and any i 
other way categories. Her recipes 
were Cranberry Glazed Tart and | 
Cranberried Beans. She also placed 
in the pies and cookies categories. 
Judging the event were Joan Gar- 
retson, cranberry grower; Liz 
O'Donoghue, home economist, 



Vines For Sale 

Ben Lear $3,500 a ton 

Stevens $3,500 a ton 

Crowley $3,500 a ton 

Le Munyon $3,500 a ton 

Searles $3,500 a ton 

$500 a ton less with 50% payment before cutting 

David Zawistowski, Owner 
6031 County Highway D (715) 479-4658 
Eagle River, Wl 54521 (715) 479-6546 






Plymouth Copters, Ltd 



Growers fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides applied to growers specifications 

Mud Lifting - Cranberry Lifting 

Mats Available 



Plymouth Airport 

Box 3446 

Plymouth, MA 02361 



David J. Morey 

Richard H. Sgarzi 

(508) 746-6030 



^gr^cultural Applications • Lift \>Jork • Executive Charters • Aerial Photography 



Page 10 CRANBERRIES February 1989 



'Plymouth County Extension Ser- 
/ice, and Sonia Young, pastry chef, 
Chmuras Bakery, Springfield, Mass. 
Young also gave a demonstration 
of how to make Cranberry Baklava. 

To obtain a copy of all the win- 
aing recipes, send a large (#10) self- 
addressed, stamped envelope to 
'MIBwC," c/o Dorothy Angley, P.O. 
Box 270, Carver, MA 02330. Send a 
separate envelope for each set of 
•ecipes desired. 

Prospective entrants for the 1989 
lontest can obtain information and 
intry blanks from the same address. 
i)ntry blanks will be mailed in 
iarly September. 

Belov/ are the prizewinning 
ecipes. 

CRANBERRY PIES 

s-IRST PRIZE: Cranberry Almond 
>enie Pie 

^rraine Carr, Rochester, Mass. 

9" pie shell 

t cups fresh cranberries 
i cup light corn syrup 
i orange, seeded but not peeled, ground 

in food processor 

i cup butter or margarine, softened 
'/fe cups confectioners' sugar 

egg 

teaspoon almond extract 

JARNISH (optional): 1 tablespoon 
almonds, toasted 
tablespoon candied orange peel 

Vepare and bake pie shell. Cut out and bake 
ecorative shapes from leftover crust to use 
s garnish. Combine cranberries, com syrup 
nd orange in a medium saucepan. Cook on 
ledium heat until berries pop and mixture 
lickens. Set aside to cool. Using a mixer, 
-earn butter and sugar until fluffy. Beat in 
?g and extract. Spread filling into cooled 
ie shell. Top with cranberry orange mix- 
ire. Garnish with baked decorations, toasted 
monds and candied orange peel. Yield one 



ECOND PRIZE: Cranberry-Rhubarb 

ie 

;rnard Lacouture, Cataumet, Mass. 

.astry for 9" two-crust pie 
^eggs, slightly beaten 

cup milk or cream (optional) 

^ cup sugar 

cup flour 

teaspoon cinnamon 

teaspoon nutmeg 

ash salt 

sups fresh cranberries, finely chopped 

cups rhubarb, finely chopped 

liter or margarine 

»bIespoon milk 

kwdered sugar 

ne 9 inch pie pan with 1/2 of the pastry; use 
e other half of the pastry for lattice top. In 
nedium mixing bowl, combine eggs, Vi cup 
Ik or cream, sugar, flour, spices and salt. 
X in cranberries and rhubarb. Pour into 



pie shell. Dot with butter. Make lattice top. 
Combine 1 tablespoon milk with juice 
remaining in bowl and brush over crust. 
Bake 50-60 minutes or until golden brown. 
Cool pie completely. Sprinkle with powdered 
sugar. Chill. Serve with whipped cream or 
ice cream. Yield one pie. 

THIRD PRIZE: Cranberries Blueber- 
ries Pie 

Irene Varrecchia, Riverside, R.I. 

Pastry for a 9" double crust pie 

1 cup sugar 

1 cup water 

1 package fresh cranberries 

1 can blueberry pie filling 

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Line pie pan 
with pastry; roll out top crust. In a mediimi 
saucepan, combine sugar and water; bring 
to a boil, stirring to dissolve sugar. Add 
cranberries, return to boil. Reduce heat and 
boil gently until berries pop, stirring occa- 
sionally. Cool completely. Stir in blueberry 
pie filling. Pour into pastry lined pie pan; 
cover with top crust, seal and vent. Brush 
top with milk and bake for one hour or until 
golden brown. Yield one pie. 



CRANBERRY COOKIES 
FIRST PRIZE: Cranberry Crunchies 

Lorraine Carr 

COOKIES 

Vi cup butter 

¥4 cup sugar 

1 cup oats 

1 teaspoon baking powder 

3 tablespoons flour 

Mi teaspoon salt 

legg 

FILLING 

3 heaping tablespoons marshmallow 

creme 
% cup butter or margarine, softened 
1 cup powdered sugar 



Vi teaspoon vanilla 
Milk to thin, if needed 

1 cup fresh cranberries, chopped 

Filling: Beat marshmallow and butter until 
fluffy. Beat in sugar and vanilla; add milk 
to thin if needed. Stir in cranberries. Set 
aside. 

Cookie: FVeheat oven to STSdegrees. Grease 
and flour cookie sheets. Melt butter in a 
saucepan. Remove from heat; stir in sugar, 
baking powder, flour, salt and egg. Cool 10 
Drop by teaspoonfuls onto cookie sheets, 3 
apart. Bake for 8 minutes. Quickly remove 
from cookie sheet to a rack. If cookie sticks 
to sheet, return to oven 1-2 minutes. When 
cool, spread filling on half of the cookies and 
top with the other half. 
Yield 2 dozen cookies. 

SECOND PRIZE: Cranberry Party 
Cookies 

Irene Varrecchia 

COOKIE: 2/3 cup butter or margarine, 

softened 
1/3 cup sugar 

2 egg yolks 

1 teaspoon vanilla 
IVi cup flour 

V4 teaspoon salt 

2 egg whites 

% cup finely chopped walnuts 

FILLING 

IM2 cups fresh cranberries 

'/4 cup orange juice 

% cup sugar 

IVi teaspoons cornstarch 

1 tablespoon water 

Filling: In a covered saucepan on medium 
heat, cook cranberries, orange juice and 
sugar until the berries pop. Combine corn- 
starch and water; add to cranberry mixture. 
Cook until mixture thickens, approximately 

2 minutes. Chill. 

Cookie: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a 
medium mixing bowl, cream butter and 
sugar. Beat in egg yolks and vanilla. In a 
separate bowl, combine dry ingredients; 




ABEL'S 
APIARIES 



Call or Write: 

Abel's Apiaries 
P.O. Box 234 
Sydney, Florida 33587 
Phone (813) 659-0784 or 
(301)592-9712 



CRANBERRIES February 1989 Page 11 



add to egg mixture, mixing thoroughly. 
Cover and chill one hour. Shape dough into 
1 inch balls. Roll each ball in egg whites, 
then in nuts. Place 1 inch apart on ungreased 
cookie sheets. Bake 15-17 minutes or until 
golden brown. Cool on racks. 
Yield 2 dozen cookies. 

THIRD PRIZE: Halloween Harvest 
Cookies 

Paula Parentisis, West Wareham, Mass. 

% cup margarine 

6 tablespoons light brown sugar 

6 tablespoons granulated sugar 

legg 

IV4 cups flour, sifted 

V^ teaspoon baking soda 

Mi teaspoon salt 

M2 teaspoon vanilla extract 

V4 teaspoon orange extract 

Mi cup chocolate covered raisins 

Vi cup chocolate covered peanuts 

1 cup fresh cranberries, finely chopped 

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Lightly 
grease cookie sheets ■wiUn. salad oil. 
Cream margarine and both sugars; beat 
in egg. Sift dry ingredients together 
and add to creamed mixture. Combine 
vanilla and orange extracts and cran- 
berries; stir into batter. Fold in nuts 
and raisins. Drop batter by small tea- 
spoonfuls onto cookie sheets (about 20 
to a sheet). Bake for 12-15 minutes or 
until golden brown and firm to the 
touch. Yield approximately 4 dozen 2" 
cookies. 

"These cookies were the result of an over- 
supply of chocolate covered raisins and 
peanuts one recent Halloween. I thought it 



might be interesting to see what could be 
done with them." 



CRANBERRY BARS AND 
SQUARES 

FIRST PRIZE: Cranberry Pineapple 
Squares 

Lorraine Carr 

CRUST 

1 cup butter, softened 



Vi cup powdered sugar 

2 cups flour 
TOPPING 

Vi cup bro^vn sugar, packed 
y* cup floiu* 
V4 cup butter, softened 
% cup nuts, chopped 
FILLING 

1 20-ounce crushed pineapple in syrup, 
drained, reserving 1 cup syrup 

3 cups fresh cranberries 
1 Mi cups sugar 



14 



Inc. 



381 West Grove Street (Rte. 28) 
Middleboro, MA 02346 



Tractors 2 & 4 wheel drive — 12-90 hp. 

Compact Excavators 1 '/? to 6 ton 
Wheel Leaders '/? to % yd. 
Water Cooled Diesel Engines 

AH Types of Implements 
Poly mark Beaver-Mowers 
Specialty Fabrication Work 
Kubota Financing as Low as 8'/?% 

*Sales ^Service *Pai1s ^Leasing 



4 to 104 hp. 



947-6299 



I 



Office 
295-2222 



CRANBERRY 
GROWERS SERVICE 



K. Beaton 
295-2207 




D. Beaton 
888-1288 

COMPLETE BOG 
MANAGEMENT 

HARVESTING 
(Wet & Dry) 



Specializing in 

• NETTING 



SANDING 



P. Beaton 
947-3601 

DITCHING 



CUSTOM 

HERBICIDE 

APPLICATION 




Complete line of portable Crisafulll Pumps 2" 
Plastic netting for suction boxes 



16" 



J 



Page 12 CRANBERRIES February 1989 



CSI 



THE BEST — IN EVERY RESPECT 



CRANBERRY Model 400 GT 



Precision Chemigation System 



4w 



• Developed Exclusively for the Cranberry Industry 

• Exceeds or Meets ALL Current EPA Requirements 

• Simple to Operate and Easy to Calibrate 

— Self-Timer Application (1 minute increments) 

— Easy Access Handle & Simple Reference Scale 

— Precise Visual Flow Calibration 

• Outstanding Field Performance 

— Down-Line Venturl Injection System 

— High Capacity 0-7 GPM injection Rate 

— Large Volume 175 Gallon Mix Tanit 

— 12 Volt Gear Reduction Mixer 

• Designed for Trouble-Free Operation 

— Reliable 11 HP Honda Electric Start Engine 

— Critical Components Are Stainless Steel & Polypropylene 

• Completely Self-Contained and DOT Approved Transportable 

• Personalized, Experienced Support Service as Close as Your Phone 




CHEMIGATION SYSTEMS INTERNATIONAL, INC. 



Corporate Offices: P.O. Box 247 
(608) 297-2041 



Montello. Wl 53949 
FAX: (608) 297-7248 



Call us foday for the dealer nearest you, or contact: 








NOTICE 


Skip Tenpas 


Bruce Sunnerberg 




Central Sands Irr. & BIdg., Inc. 


AAA Industrial Pump & Ser., inc. 


Selected exclusive 


Hwy 51 & 73 Interchange 


66 Lake Street 


dealer territories 

■till avallahia 


Plalnfield, Wl 54966 


Plympton, MA 02367 




(715)335-6372 


(617) 585-2394 


Inquiries Invited 



CRANBERRIES February 1989 Page 13 



Crust: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Com- 
bine butter, powdered sugar and flour. Pat 
into an 8 X 12 pan. Bake 20 minutes or until 
lightly browned. 

Filling: In a medium saucepan, combine 
cranberries and syrup; cook on medium 
heat until berries pop. Combine cornstarch 
and sugar; add to cranberry mixture, stir- 
ring until thickened. Remove from heat and 
stir in pineapple. Pour over baked crust. 
Combine topping ingredients and sprinkle 
over cranberry layer. Bake 20 minutes or 
until tests done. Cut into squares and serve 
with cream. 
Yield 24 bars. 

SECOND PRIZE: Cranberry-Pecan 
Bars 

Suzanne GigUotti, Duxbury, Mass. 

CRUST 

2 cups flour, sifted 

1 teaspoon salt 
IViicups sugar 

VA cups margarine, softened 

3 cups oats 
FILLING 
V4 cup sugar 
Vi cup water 

2 cups fresh cranberries 

1 tablespoon lemon peel, grated 

V4 cup lemon juice 

1 tablespoon butter 

Vi teaspoon cinnamon 

V4 teaspoon salt 

1 cup pecans, chopped 

Filling: In a heavy saucepan, combine sugar 
and water, bring to a boil. Add cranberries 
and cook on medium heat until they pop. 
Add ingredients except pecans; cook over 
medium heat until thickened, about 5 min- 
utes. Remove from heat; cool to room 
temperature. Stir in pecans. 
Crust: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Sift 
together flour, salt and sugar. Cut in mar- 
garine until mixture resembles coarse 
crumbs. Add oatmeal and mix thoroughly. 
Firmly pat 3'/2 cups of this mixture into an 
ungreased 9 x 13 pan. Spread cooled fllling 
over dough and cover evenly with the 
remainder of crumbs. Bake 30-40 minutes or 
until lightly browned. Cool and cut into 
bars. 
Yield 24 bars. 

THIRD PRIZE: Cranberry Squares 

Barbara Cabral, Middleboro, Mass. 

IMi cups flour 

1 Ml cups sugar 

2 eggs, well beaten 

1 cup butter or margarine, melted 

1 cup nuts, chopped 

2 cups fresh cranberries 

Preheat oven to 325 degrees 
Grease and flour a 9 x 13 pan. Thoroughly 
mix the flrst four ingredients; add nuts and 
cranberries. Bake for 40-50 minutes or until 
lightly browned. Cool and cut into squares. 
Yield 24 bars. 



CRANBERRY DESSERT CAKES 
FIRST PRIZE: Cranberry Glazed Tort 

Irene Varrecchia 

CAKE 

1 cup butter, softened 

2 cups sugar 

Page 14 CRANBERRIES February 1988 



2 cups flour 

3 teaspoons baking powder 
V<2 teaspoon salt 

4 eggs 

1 cup milk 



1 teaspoon vanilla 

Mi teaspoon almond extract 

FILLING 

IMi cup fresh cranberries 

V4 cup orange juice 



/' 



Law Offices of 



Qames cJa^or cJ^ye 
0ames QJ. 'd€arijorI 

24 Bay Road/P.O. Box 2899 

Duxbury, Massachusetts 02331 

617-934-6575 

Bog renovation and Bog development 

(Conservation Commission, DEQE, Mass EPA, EPA and Corps of Engineers) 

Business, retirement and estate planning 

(Incorporations and partnerships, pensions and profit sharing plans, and Wills 

and Trusts) 

Land disposition 

(Purchase, sale and financing of existing bogs and potential sites) 

Land use management 

(Board of Appeals and Planning Board) 




Cranberry Cl^rtgtnalg 

T-Shirt 

"CRANBERRIES 

North America's Native Fruit" 



An Original Botanical Design 

of Blossoms and Green & Ripe Cranberries 

by 



Adult T-Stiirt (Sizes S, M, X, XL) $12 

Adult XXL T-Shirt $14 

Youth Size 14-16 T-Shirt $11 

Children's Sizes 4, 6-8, 10-12 $11 

Adult Sweatshirt (S, M, X, XL) $25 

Adult XXL Sweatshirt $28 

Youth 14-16 Sweatshirt $21 

Children's Sweatshirt (4,6-8, 10-12) $19 



Send Check or Money Order to: 
CRANBERRIES 

P.O. Box 249 
Cobalt, CT 06414 

Add $3,50 Shipping & Handling Charge 
For Canadian orders, add $8 



I 

I 
U 
I 



NAME 

ADDRESS. 
CITY 



. STATE . 



ZIP 



>'/4 cup sugar 

iVi teaspoons cornstarch 

1 tablespoon water 

¥i teaspoon lemon peel 

ICING 

1 pound powdered sugar 

1 stick butter, softened 

Dash salt 

1 teaspoon vanilla 

3 tablespoons milk 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 9 inch 
cake pan. In a medium mixing bowl, using a 
mixer, cream butter; add sugar, beating 
until light and fluffy. In a separate bowl, sift 
flour, baking powder and salt. Set aside. 
Add eggs, one at a time, to the creamed mix- 
ture. Add flour alternately with milk and 
vanilla; beat until smooth. Pour batter into 
pan. Make cupcakes with the remaining 
batter. Bake 25-30 minutes or until it tests 
lone. Cool completely. In a medium mixing 
Dowl, using a mixer, combine all of the icing 
ngredients. Cut cake in half to form 2 lay- 
srs. Spread a generous layer of icing on the 
;op of bottom layer. Place top layer on top of 
cing. Spread glaze on top of cake. Spread 
cing on sides of cake. Use remaining 
cing for cupcakes. Yield one 9" layer cake. 

SECOND PRIZE: I Love Cranberries 
:ake 

jorraine Carr 

:ake 

[ cup butter 

^ Mi cups sugar 

. teaspoon vanilla 

'M cups flour 

I teaspoons baking powder 

cup milk 

I egg whites, stiffly beaten 
'i cup fresh cranberries, chopped 
'2 cup nuts 
i'lLLING 

I cups fresh cranberries 
V4 cups sugar 
i teaspoon cinnamon 
i'ROSTING 
<i cup butter, softened 
8 teaspoon salt 

cup shortening 

cups powdered sugar 

teaspoon almond extract 

cup coconut 

Teheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease two 8" 
jund cake pans. Using a mixer, cream but- 
tr until fluffy. Gradually add sugar and 
eat on medium speed for about 10 minutes, 
eat in vanilla. Combine flour and baking 
Dwder; add to creamed mixture alternately 
ith milk. Fold in egg whites, cranberries 
iid nuts. Pour into pans and bake for 30-35 
inutes or until cake tests done. Turn outon 
icks to cool. 
Tiile cake is baking, prepare the filling. In 



Subscribe to 

CRANBERRIES 

$15 a year 

Send check or money order to: 
CRANBERRIES 

P.O. Box 249 
Cobalt, CT 06414 



a medium saucepan, combine the filling 
ingredients and bring to a boil. Lower heat 
and simmer Sminutes, stirring occasionally 
until the berries have popped and mixture 
has thickened. Drain mixture and let cool. 
While cake is cooling, prepare the frosting. 
In a medium mixing bowl, cream butter, salt 
and shortening with 1 cup of powered sugar. 
Gradually add remaining sugar and extract; 
mix well. 



To assemble, spread V2 of the cranberry fil- 
ling on the top of one cake. Top with remain- 
ing cake. Spread frosting on top and sides of 
cake. Place some frosting in a pastry bag 
with star tip. Pipe stars around top edge. 
With toothpick, mark heart shape in center 
of cake. Pipe stars around heart. Fill in 
heart with remaining cranberry filling. Press 
coconut onto sides of cake. Yield one 8" two 
layer cake. 



WOLLSCHLAGER EXCAVATING 

Dragline Work — All Kinds 
Also Have Clam & Scalping Buckets 

Routs 1 NecBdah. Ull 54646 

1-608-565-2436 



A Vines For Sale a 

I Crowley $3,000 a ton I 

▼ Searles $2,500 a ton » 

A 10%discount with 50% payment by March 15 A 

B Remainder due on delivery or pickup I 

I G. BROCKMAN, INC. I 

L4409 Brockman Road ! 

Vesper, Wl 54489 I 

(715)423-0368 (715)423-7016 I 
► ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ w 




CONSULTING ENGINEERS 
SURVEYORS 



Extensive experience in all aspects of cranberry 
land development: evaluation, purchase, survey, 
design, permit acquisition, phased construction and 
planting both in wetlands and uplands. 

Have references. Will travel. 

Contact: Will Lee 

10948 Highway 54 East 
Wisconsin Rapids, Wl 54494 

(715)424-3131 



CRANBERRIES February 1989 Page 16 



THIRD PRIZE: Cranberry "Surprise" 
Cake 

Gerry Griffith, South Carver, Mass. 

CAKE 

1 cup butter 
IVi cups sugar 

2 eggs 

1 cup sour cream 

1 teaspoon almond extract 

2 cups flour 

Ml teaspoon baking soda 
IMi teaspoon baking powder 
FILLING 
^4 cup nuts 

1 teaspoon cinnamon 

2 tablespoons sugar 

% cup fresh cranberries, chopped 
GLAZE (optional) 

3 tablespoons cranberry juice cocktail 
2 cups powdered sugar 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 9" 
Bundt pan. In a medium mixing bowl, com- 
bine all of the cake ingredients in the order 
given. Spread half of the batter into the pan. 
Spread the filling on top. Cover filling with 
remaining batter. Bake for 1 hour or until 
tests done. Cool completely. Combine glaze 
ingredients and drizzle over cake. Yield one 
9" Bundt cake. 

CRANBERRY BREADS 

FIRST PRIZE: Cranberry Banana 
Bread 

Linda Shea, Whitman, Mass. 

1% cup unsifted flour 

1 tablespoon baking powder 
% cup sugar 

Vi cup shortening 

2 eggs 

1 cup bananas, mashed 
IV* cups fresh cranberries, coarsely 
chopped 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and 
flour a 9 X 5 loaf pan. Mix flour and baking 
powder, set aside. In a medium mixing bowl, 
beat sugar, shortening and eggs together 
until light and fluffy. Mix in bananas and 
cranberries. Add dry ingredients to batter, 
stirring just until smooth. Pour into pan and 
bake 50-60 minutes or until firmly set and 
golden brown. Cool in pan 15 minutes before 
turning out onto a rack. Yield one bread. 



^^K^^JHRy 



# 




-^ 



COMPUTER, INC. 
CRANWARE 

• Growers 

• Handlers 

• Chemical Applications 

• Chemicol Resale 

(506) 291 --11 92 

2 Tobey f^ood, Worehom, MA 02571 



SECOND PRIZE: Cranberry Apricot 
Quick Cake 

Lorraine Carr 

2 cups flour 
% cup sugar 

3 teaspoons baking powder 
Mi teaspoon cinnamon 

1 teaspoon salt 

Mi teaspoon baking soda 

1 cup walnuts, chopped 



legg 

% cup applesauce 

Mi cup sour cream 

1 Mi cup fresh cranberries, chopped 
% cup canned apricots, drained and 

chopped 

2 tablespoons shortening, melted 
GLAZE (optional) 
1 cup powdered sugar 
1-2 tablespoons apricot juice 



:r»'.?V^>i;T?r. 



7»riV^>>^ 



J. A . JENKINS & SON CO, 

Grower Service 



MOWING (ALL TYPES) 
SANDING 



DITCHING 
WEED WIPING 



Serving Cape Cod 

227 Pine St., W. Barnstable, Ma. 02668 

Phone 362-6018 



t^^fi^^ iv^^^^^j/y^.^^* 



r:,»i f^j^^^^x ita. 



N.J. Vines For Sale 

CLEAN — PURE 

From Producing Bog With 

Excellent Production 

Records 

Cro^irley $3f 750 a ton 

Lee Bros. Inc. 

Chatsworth, NJ 08019 
(609) 726-9292 N ite: 726-1 21 4 



Page 16 CRANBERRIES February 1989 



■'reheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 9 x 5 
uaf pan. Sift dry ingredients together; add 
nuts. In a medium mixing bowl, beat egg, 
applesauce and sour cream. Stir in cranber- 
ries, apricots and shortening. Blend in dry 
ingredients into batter, stirring just until 
moistened. Pour into pan and bake one hour 
jr until tests done. Cool in pan 10 minutes 
aefore turning out onto a rack. Cool over- 



^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«««4«^ 



NIemI 

Electric 

Company 




Robert 
Niemi 

Electrical 
Contractors 



Heat, Light & Power Wiring 

• RESIDENTIAL 

• COMMERCIAL 
• INDUSTRIAL 

Pinehurst Drive 
Wareham, Mass. X 
TEL. 295-1880 ♦ 

^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦4>t 



♦ 

♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
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♦ 
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♦ 
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♦ 
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♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 



night. Combine glaze ingredients to desired 
consistency and drizzle on cake. Arrange 
walnut halves and frosted cranberries on 
top as garnish, if desired. Yield one bread. 

THIRD PRIZE: Cranberry Rye Bread 

Victoria Steponaitis, Middlebury, Conn. 

BREAD 

3'/2-4 cups all purpose flour 

3 packages dry yeast 

2 teaspoons caraway seeds 



1/3 cup dry milk powder 

2 cups cranberry juice cocktail 

Vi> cup brown sugar 

2 tablespoons molasses 

2 tablespoons shortening 

2 teaspoons salt 

2 tablespoons orange rind 

2Vi2 cups rye flour 

CANDIED CRANBERRIES 

2 cups fresh cranberries 

1 cup sugar 




CORPORATION 

OF NEW ENGLAND 



Industrial Suppliers To The Cranberry Industry 



Chain, Cable and Accessories 

Used for Making Mats 

All Types of Fasteners (BuIk & Packaged) 

Hand Tools Pumps 

Power Tools Motors 

Cfiemicals Abrasives 

Lubricants Cutting Tools 

Safety Equipment 




Richards Rd 
Plymouth Industrial Park 
V 



747-0086 
Plymouth, MA 02360 




Spring 1989 



Ben Lear 
Crowley 
Stevens 
Pilgrims 

Buy 1 tons, get one ton free. 



I 20% down payment with order. 
Call for large order pricing. 



J^^^^ 



CRANBERRIES, INC 



Vines For Sale 



$3,500.00 per ton 
$3,500.00 per ton 
$3,500.00 per ton 
$4,000.00 per ton 



Prices F.O.B. 



Contact: 
LeRoy Miles 

Northland Cranberries, inc. 
(715)424-4444 
251 Oak Street 
Wisconsin Rapids, Wl 54494 



FiihmvswiHrMvsirAiiff'i^^ 




CRANBERRIES February 1989 Page 17 



BREAD 

In a large mixing bowl, combine 2V2 cups all 
purpose flour, yeast, caraway seeds and dry 
milk. Set aside. In a medium saucepan, heat 
cranberry juice, brown sugar, molasses, 
shortening and salt to 1 15-120 degrees, stir- 
ring occasionally. Add the heated liquid to 
the dry ingredients, mixing thoroughly. Stir 
in orange peel. Using a mixer, beat the 
dough on low speed for about 1 minute. 
Increase to high speed and continue beating 
for about 3 minutes. By hand, stir in rye 
flour and enough remaining all purpose 
flour to make a stiff dough. Knead dough on 
a lightly floured surface for about 8-10 min- 
utes. Shape into a ball and place in a 
greased bowl; turn dough over to grease 
other side. Cover and let rise until doubled 
in size. Punch dough down. Let dough rest 
10 minutes. 

CANDIED CRANBERRIES 
Preheat oven to 250 degrees. Spread cran- 
berries in a jelly roll pan or shallow baking 
pan. Sprinkle with sugar. Cover with foil 
and bake for about one hour, stirring sev- 
eral times during baking. Cool berries. Store 
in a tightly covered container. Use in breads, 
muffins, cakes, etc. 

ON A LIGHTLY floured surface, work can- 
died cranberries into dough. Roll lightly 
jelly roll style and place in angel food cake 
pan or into 2 9x5 loaf pans. Cover and let 
rise until doubled in size. Bake at 375 degrees 
for about 30-40 minutes or until golden 
brown. Place bread on rack and rub with 
butter if desired. Cool. Yield 1 ring or 2 
loaves. 

CRANBERRY MUFFINS 
FIRST PRIZE: Cranberry Peach 



Streusel Muffins 

Lorraine Carr 
Vi cup fresh cranberries 
'^ cup light corn syrup 
Vi cup butter 

1 cup sugar 

2 eggs 

2 cups flour 

2 teaspoons baking powder 

y2 teaspoon salt 

Mi cup sour cream 

1 teaspoon vanilla 

1 medium peach, peeled & cubed or 

% cup canned or frozen streusel 
TOPPING 
'/4 cup brown sugar, packed 



2 tablespoons flour 
2 tablespoons butter 
1/3 cup pecans, chopped 

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Grease muffin 
pans. In a medium saucepan on medium 
heat, combine cranberries and syrup and 
cook until berries pop. Drain and set aside. 
With a mixer on low speed, cream butter and 
sugar until fluffy; beat in eggs. Sift together 
dry ingredients and add alternately with 
sour cream and vanilla to the creamed mix- 
ture. Stir peach and cranberries into batter. 
Spoon into muffin cups. Combine topping 
ingredients and sprinkle over muffins. Bake 
for 30 minutes or until tests done. Cool in 
pan for 30 minutes. Yield approximately 15 
muffins. 



"mn 



VOLM BAG COMPANY, INC. 



BAG COMPANY I 

WiZ^ ^ 1804 EDISON ST. BOX B, ANTIGO, WIS. 54409-0116 
PHONE 715/627-4826 

SUPPLYING AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS 

BRAVO - SEVIN - FUNGINEX - ORTHENE 
CASORON - GUTHION - DEVRINOL - PARATHION 

AND 

DELIVERING A COMPLETE LINE OF FERTILIZER 
WITH FAST FRIENDLY SERVICE!!! 



vvvvv^vvxxxsxxxssxxsxxxsxxxxsssxssxxxssxxsxsxsvvvv^^ 




Vines For sale x. 



Ben Lears $4,500 a ton 



Orders paid in advance 

by February 
receive a 10% discount. 

60 Tons Available 

Jonjak Cranberry Farm Inc. 
Hayward, Wisconsin 

Call Randy Jonjak 
(715) 634-3979 



TRUE VARIETIES 



Stevens $4,000 a ton 

Orders paid in advance 

by February 
receive a 10% discount. 

30 Tons Available 

Cranberry Springs Inc. 
Hayward, Wisconsin 

Call Stanley Roy Jonjak 
(715) 634-3044 
(715) 634-3286 



HONEST WEIGHTS 



^vvvvvvv SSXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX vvvvvvvvv vvvvvvvvvv vvvvvvvvv^^ 



Page 18 CRANBERRIES February 1989 



SECOND PRIZE: Lazy Morning Muffins 

[•Paula Parentisis 

1 19-ounce package Duncan Hines 
"Bakery Style" Bran & Honey Nut 
Muffin Mix 
legg 

% cup water 

1 12-ounce tub Ocean Spray Cran'Fruit 
' Cranberry Orange Sauce 

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Grease muffin 
pans. Follow mixing directions on muffin 
package; let sit for 2-4 minutes until batter is 
slightly thickened. Fill each muffin cup '/j 
:up full of batter. Place scant teaspoonful* 
jf Cran»Fruit Sauce in center of each muf 
iin cup, taking care to keep away from edges 
}f cups. Cover with remaining batter; sprinkle 
vith topping. Bake for 16-18 minutes or 
mtil muffins test done. Yield 12-14 2'/2" 
nuffins. 

'teaspoon refers to tableware, not measur- 
; ng spoons. 



rniRD PRIZE: Cran-Walnut Muffins 

ferry Griffith 

2 cup butter 
■A cups sugar 

eggs 

V4 cups flour 

teaspoons baking powder 
! teaspoon salt 
: cup milk 

! cup nuts, chopped 
% cups fresh cranberries, chopped 

reheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease muffin 
ans. Cream butter and sugar until fluffy, 
lend in eggs, flour, baking powder and 
lit. Add milk, mix thoroughly. Stir in nuts 
nd cranberries. Bake for 25-30 minutes or 
itil golden brown. Yield 18 muffins. 

COFFEE CAKES 
IRST PRIZE: Kelly's Cranberry Bun 

race Andruk, Bridgewater, Mass. 

package dry yeast 
cup warm water 
^3 cup shortening 
• teaspoon salt 



The 

CHARLES W.HARRIS 
Company 

451 Old Somerset Avenue 

North Dighton, Mass. 

Phone 824-5607 

AMES 

Irrigation Systems 

RAIN BIRD 

Sprinklers 

HALE 

Pumps 

Hlihsif Qtttlifif pfotluefs 
WlfliSiflshethn GutmiMil 



Cranberry Cleaning 
Equipment 

• 2,000 lb. feed bin • 

• Chain conveyors • 

• Wire mesh conveyors • 

• 6,000 Ib/hr flow dryer • 

• Belt degrasser • 

• Hay den separators • 

• Wire bog conveyor & loader • 

Lee Bros. Inc. 

Chatsworth, NJ 08019 
(609) 726-9292 



Vin 



Ben Lear $5,000 a ton 

Stevens $4,000 a ton 

Crowley $4,000 a ton 

Bergman $4,000 a ton 

Prices are F.O.B. 
$500 a ton less with 50% payment before cutting 



Richberry Farms Ltd. 



11280 Mellis Drive 
Richmond, B.C. 
V6X 1L7 Canada 



Res. (604) 273-4505 
Bus. (604) 273-0777 



CRANBERRIES February 1989 Page 19 



Vi cup sugar 

1 cup milk, scalded 

1 egg, beaten 

3Vi cups flour 

GLAZE 

1 cup confectioners sugar 

1 tablespoon milk 
CRANBERRY RAISIN FILLING 
% cup sugar 

2 tablespoons flour 
Dash salt 

IMi cup fresh cranberries, halved 

% cup raisins 

Mi cup water 

1/8 teaspoon almond extract 

Melted butter 

In a medium Baucepan, mix dry ingredients; 
add fruits and water. Bring to a boil over 
medium heat; boil for 5 minutes. Remove 
from heat and stir in almond extract. 
Punch down dough. On a lightly floured 
surface, roll out dough to a 10 x 15 rectangle. 
Brush with melted butter. Spread filling 
over dough to within 1 inch of ends. Roll up 
jelly roll style. Place on cookie sheet; form a 
circle and pinch ends together to seal. With 
a sharp knife, cut to within 1 inch of center 
of circle; slightly twist each section. Let rise 



Pump Repairs 
& Scales 

All Types 

• Field Service 

• Chemigation Equipment 
Soid 

• Demonstration by 
Appointment 

AAA Industrial 
Pump Service Inc. 

Bruce Sunnerberg 

66 Lake Street 

Plympton, MA 02367 

(617)585-2394 




Bogs For Lease 

22 Acres — Taunton 

•Dormant Bogs 
•Chapter 61 A 
•Ready to Rebuild 
•Complete Plans 
• Long Term Lease 

Stephen Horbach 

25 Mariner Ct. 
Brewster, MA 02631 



i 
I 

i 
I 
I 
l 

I 



until double in size. 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Bake 30 min- 
utes or until golden brown. Cool. Combine 
glaze ingredients and drizzle over cake. 
Yield 1 coffee ring. 

SECOND PRIZE: Cranberry Orange 
Coffee Cake 

Lorraine Carr 

DOUGH 

3%-4V4 cups flour 

Mi cup sugar 

1 package dry yeast 

'A teaspoon salt 

1 5-ounce can evaporated milk 
1/3 cup orange juice or water 
1/4 cup butter or margarine 

2 eggs 



FILLING 

1 cup orange marmalade 

2 cups fresh cranberries 
^^ cup sugar 
ORANGE GLAZE 

1 cup powdered sugar 

1-2 tablespoons orange juice 

2 tablespoons almond slices, toasted 

In a medium mixing bowl, mix 2 cups flour, 
sugar, yeast and salt. Heat milk, water or 
juice and butter up to 120- 130 degrees. Using 
a mixer on low speed, add Uquid to dry mix- 
ture; beat 2 minutes. Stir in enough remain- 
ing flour to make a soft dough. Knead dough' 
on a lightly floured surface for 4 minutes. 
Place dough in a greased bowl; turn dough 
over to grease other side. Cover and let rise 



WANTED 

Gravel O Sand 

in the southeastern Massachusetts area 

Quantities of 10,000 yards and up 

Complete site work, bog construction and finistied 

contouring of surrounding area plus the best price 

for your material. 



Michael Coan 
Carver, Mass. 
(508) 866-5285 



Earl White 

Medfield, Mass. 

(508) 359-7291 



^0^I^WW^I^^I^^I^W^im^W^I^W^I^WW^P^I^W^I^ 



^X).GRA% 



/ 




SERVICES 

Herbicides 
Applied 



Custom Pruning 
Custom DItcfiIng 

West Wareham, 
Massachusetts 



Sanding 

Wiping 

Wet Harvesting 

Mowing 

(Mowing includes 
Hydraulic Arm 
Flail Mower.) 



Ask for Rick at 
295-5158 



Page 20 CRANBERRIES February 1989 



I jitil double in size. 
'Meanwhile, prepare filling. In a medium 
aucepan, combine marmalade, cranberries 
nd sugar; cook on mediimi heat until ber- 
ies pop and mixture thickens. Set aside, 
•unch down dough and divide in half. Roll 
ne half to an 18x 12rectangle. Spread with 
alf of the filling. Roll up jelly roll style, 
'lace seam side up in a greased 12 cup 
iundt pan. Seal ends. Repeat with remain- 
ig dough and filling, placing second roll on 
)p of the first, seam side down. Cover and 
t rise until double in size, 
ake at 350 degrees for 35-45 minutes or 
ntil golden brown. To prevent overbrown- 
ig, cover with foil after 20 minutes of bak- 
ig. Remove from pan and cool on wire rack, 
ombine glaze ingredients to desired con- 
stency and drizzle on cake. Sprinkle with 
monds. Garnish as desired. Yield 1 coffee 
ike. 

HIRD PRIZE: Christmas Cranberry 
ivirl Coffee Cake 

irraine Graffam, Plymouth, Mass. 

stick butter or margarine 

cup sugar 

eggs 
: cups flour 

teaspoon baking soda 

teaspoon salt 

2up sour cream 

teaspoon vanilla 

16-ounce can cranberry sauce 
' cup nuts, chopped 
(LAZE (optional) 
!3up powdered sugar 
: tablespoon cranberry cordial 

Jeheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease an 
i gel food cake pan. In medium mixing 
Iwl, cream butter and sugar until fluffy. 
Ad eggs, beat well. Combine dry ingre- 
cmts; add to creamed mixture. Blend in 
Ear cream and vanilla; mix thoroughly. 
I ur 1/3 of the batter into the pan, sprinkle 
c '/2 of the nuts and half of the cranberry 
suce. Make another layer in the same 
,tmner. Top with remaining 1/3 of batter. 
I.ke for approximately 55 minutes or until 
tits done. Cool 5 minutes and remove from 
pn. Combine glaze ingredients and drizzle 
oer cake. Garnish with holly and fresh 



cranberries for the holidays. Yield 12 
servings. 

ANY OTHER WAY 
FIRST PRIZE: Cranberried Beans 

Irene Varecchia 

1 16-ounce can whole berry cranberry 
sauce 

2 16-ounce cans baked beans 



1 small onion, grated 

2 teaspoona mustard 

4 brockwurst or frankfurts 

Preheat oven to 360 degrees. In a IVi quart 
casserole dish, arrange a layer of beans, a 
layer of whole berry cranberry sauce and a 
sprinkling of onion and mustard. Repeat 
layering in this manner, ending with a layer 
of beans. Bake for 20 minutes. Stir in 
brockwurst or frankfurts. Bake an addi- 
tional 30 minutes. Yield 4 servings. 




Norosac Herbicide is unparalleled in controlling weeds and grasses in young fruit trees 
nursery stock, blackberries, cranberries, raspberries and blueberries, 

CAN YOUR PRESENT 

PRE-EMERGENT HERBICIDE 

DO ALL OF THESE? 




* Be applied over and 
through existing weed 
growth? 

* Kill existing vegetation? 

* Control aririual weeds 
and grasses'? 



♦ Control perennial weeds and 
grasses including quackgrass 
and horsetail (Equisetum)? 

■*• And can it last through 
the growing season 
with one application! 



NOROSAC* 4G CAN.. AND DOES! 



pbi/Gondon 



coppaRation , 



' 1217 WEST 12TM STREET 
P.O. BOX 4090 

KANSAS CITY. MISSOURI 64101 
816/421-4070 



NOROSAC 



Norosac" IS a registered trademark of PBI/Gordon Corporation 




;'1988, PBI/Gordon Corporation 



PORTABLE MICROSCOPES 

Professional, inexpensive microscopes for 
examination of plants in the field for: 

SOUTHERN RED MITE * PARASITIZED FRUITWORM EGGS 
NEMATODES *TIPWORM LARVAE IN UPRIGHTS 

Two models, 25x fixed or 18-36x variable 
magnification. Sold with a 20-day trial guarantee. 
Call for our complete catalog, references, prices. 

PEST MANAGEMENT SUPPLY INC. 

P.O. BOX 938 

AMHERST, MA 01004 

800 272-7672 

413 253-3747 (in Mass.) 





CRANBERRIES February 1989 Page 21 



SECOND PRIZE: Cape Cod Cracker 
Dip 

Lorraine Carr 

1 8-ounce package cream cheese, 
softened 

2 cups fresh cranberries, ground 
% cup sugar 

Ml cup crushed pineapple, drained 
Chopped nuts 

In a medium mixing bowl, combine cran- 
berries, sugar and pineapple. Set aside. 
Whip cream cheese; blend into cranberry 
mixture. Sprinkle with nuts. Excellent on 
bagels or English muffins. Yield l'/2 cups. 



THIRD PRIZE: Cranberry Chutney 

Mary Reid, Plymouth, Mass. 



Wanted 

Wisconsin Cranbeny 
Grower wishes to purchase 
an existing cranberry marsh. 

STEVE 

(715)421-0917 
(715)593-2385 



4 cups fresh cranberries 
2 Mi cups sugar 

1 cup water 

6 whole cloves 

2 cinnamon sticks 
¥i teaspoon salt 

1 cup golden raisins 

2 tart apples, peeled and diced 
2 firm pears, peeled and diced 
1 small onion, chopped 






% cup celery, chopped 

1 teaspoon lemon peel, grated 

In a large saucepan, combine the first sij 
ingredients; bring to a boil, stirring fre 
quently, until the berries pop. Add raisins 
apples, onion and celery. Continue cooking 
stirring constantly until thick, about If 
minutes. Remove from heat, add lemon pee! 
Ladle into sterilized jars. 



i 

I 



BIG WHEEL 
TRUCK SALES 

42 Quanapoag 
E. Freetown^ Mass. 

All types of medium and heavy duty trucks on 
hand from cab & chassis to dump trucks to road 
tractors. 

Largest used truck dealer in New England. 

All types of diesel repair. 

Largest tow trucks on the East Coast. 



Call Bob or Eric 



(508) 763-5927 

or 
(508) 763-8745 



22 years experience 



constructi on lifts ^^^ 



B 

^sS 



« 




AERIA^FTING 



^BERRy UFTINGo 

nylon berry bags 
ba//< bins 

CRANBERRY 
GROWERS SERVICE 



%l^S!5^w^^^ mat renfals^o- sales 




o MUV LIFTING <> 
HmMATS 

lightweight 
durable 

Goniaci 
PETER o^ CHUCK 

508-295-2222 



Page 22 CRANBERRIES February 1989 











MTC 


MIDDLEBOROUGH 
TRUST COMPANY 




The Business Bank. 

MTC offers you business banking built to your needs. 

Personal attention to your special 

financial requirements now and as you grow. Cooperation 

Flexibility. Complete business and personal banking. 

Member FUIC 

»^ f^ Main Office 

\jjjjl^ *;*"* 10 John Glass, Jr. Square, Middleborough 

Branch Offices 

Middleboro Square, Rt. 28, Middleborough • Middleboro Plaza, Middleborough 
Cranberry Plaza, East Warehann • Carver Square, Carver • Trucchi's Plaza, Taunton 

Telephone all offices 947-1313 




CRANBERRIES February 1989 Page 23 



Take Good 

Care of Yourself 

Have an Ocean Spray! 








CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

March 1989 Vol. 53, No. 3 




133 
CO >>• 



What 

Information 

Should They 

Contain? 



%n$m 



Cranberry Juice 



of OCEAN SPRAY' 

rry Juice Cocktail 
ry slightly with the 
on In the natural 
(cranberries. No 
colorings are used 

I\TE AFTER OPENING 
SERVE NATURAL 
ESS AND FLAVOR 

serve well chilled. 





:00"20010 



lOOO/o 
VITAMIN C 

us RD« PER SERVING 

VERY LOW 
SODIUM 




A JUICE 
DRINK 



NO ARTIFICIAL 
PRESERVATIVES, 



CONTAINS: Filtered Water, Cranberry 

Juice, High Fructose Corn Syrup, 

Cranberry Juice Concentrate, Vitamin C 

NUTRITION INFORMATION 

Per Serving 

Serving Size: 6tt oz. 

Servings per Container— 21 3 

Calones— 110, Protein— 

Carbohydrate— 26 g, Fat— 

Sodium— 10 mg 

Percentage of U.S. Recommended 
DailyAllowance(U.S. ROA) 

Vitamin C 100 

Contains less than 2% of US. RDA of 
protein, vitamin A, thiamine, riboflavin, 
' iron 



Ayyyer 



:ooTO yw 

i.sy:3Hwy 

..Ldaa B~iyid3S 

SSWW -10 AINfl 



ig you with 
me your 
ase include 
ct booklet IS 
Send ID 
!ss below. 



. <IES. INC 

225 Water Street, Plymouth, MA 02360 
Product olU.S.A K 




DRESSER 



BARK RIVER 

Quality products and 
% trained, dedicated people 
)^ standing behind them. 




It's a combination that adds up to top production for you! 

Then add BARK RIVER's full line of other quality tools and equipment and you have 
a complete source for all your equipment needs, all backed with dependable product support. 



ll 



Crawler Loaders Draglines 


Hydraulic Excavators 


Rollers 


Trucks (off-highway) 


Crawler Tractors Drills 


Hydraulic Shovels 


Scrapers 


Wheel Loaders 


Graders 


Planers 


Shovels 




• FRINK SNOW-PLOWS 


• HITACHI EXCAVATORS 
AND CRANES 




KOLMAN CONVEYORS 


• FMC WAYNE STREET 






MORBARK EEGER 


SWEEPERS 


• PAPER, CALMENSON 
BLADES AND CUTTING 




BEEVER CHIPPERS 


• CLARK-BOBCAT SKID 


EDGES 




FAIR SNOWBLOWERS 


STEER LOADERS 








• WISCONSIN TRAILERS 


• FOX SPREADERS 

• WALDON LOADERS 




AMZ ASPHALT PATCHING 
EQUIPMENT 


• VAC-ALL BY LEACH 

• GARNER IRON MULE 


• GRADALL INC. 
EXCAVATORS 




SICARD SNOWBLAST 
SNOWBLOWERS 



• TIGER HIGHWAY MOWERS • MURPHY DIESEL ENGINES 

Manufacturers of corrugated steel & aluminum culvert pipe and drainage products. 




BARK RIVER Culvert & Equipment Co. 



Backing you with 82 years of experience. 



EAU CLAIRE 
1700 Western Avenue 
Phone (715) 835-51 57 



MAOISON 
Highway 51 & Buckeye Rd. 
Phone (608) 222-4151 



GREEN BAY 
600 Liberty Street 
Phone (414) 435-6676 



SUPERIOR 
1213 Winter Street 
Phone (715)392-2243 



ESCANABA 
430 N. Lincoln Street 
Phone (906) 786-6920 



MILWAUKEE 
11715 W. Silver Spring Rd. 
Phone (414)461-5440 



Page 2 CRANBERRIES March 1989 



Ocean Spray Urges Industry, 

Consumer Groups to Get 

Behind Nutritional Labeling 



By CAROLYN GILMORE 

"Industry and consumer groups 
eed to persuade Congress that 
utritional labeling is appropriate." 

So said Ocean Spray public affairs 
pokeswoman Christine Mascleein 

recent interview about the fruit 
lice labeling controversy. 

Regulations now before the Food 
nd Drug Administration would 
jquire the percentage of juice con- 
!nt to be printed "in fairly large 

tters" on the front of all fruit juice 
ibels, Masclee pointed out. 

In the eyes of the cranberry 

)operative, the regulation would 

'0 vide a marketing advantage for 
i)me competitors. 



POLLINATION 

Are you getting the most for 
^our pollination dollar? Be sure 
he hives you rent give you maxi- 
num return. We can help. (We are 
lot pollinators: we do not rent 
lives.) Brochure available. 
Vpicultural Associates, RR 1 Box 
!25, Charlemont, MA 01 339, (413) 
139-5320,(413)625-9630. 



=*=-*(=^==H^|c=:^ 



Bogs For Lease 

22 Acres — Taunton 

•Dormant Bogs 
•Chapter 61 A 
•Ready to Rebuild 
•Complete Plans 
•Long Term Lease 

Stephen Horbach 

25 Mariner Ct. 
Brewster, MA 02631 



t=-*t=:-|i=:-^=*z=-*t=z* 



I 
\ 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 



"A company (could) replace water 
and sugar with apple juice with lit- 
tle flavor, no vitamin C and adver- 
tise their product as '100 percent 
juice,'" the Ocean Spray spokes- 
woman said. 

"Our point of view is that cran- 



COVER ILLUSTRATION 
OCEAN SPRAY began putting 
labels with nutritional facts on 
its products some 15 years ago. 
Current controversy exists over 
a Food and Drug Administration 
regulation that would require 
placing the percentage of juice 
content on a label. 



berries come naturally very con- 
centrated and tart. We don't think 
juice content is the real measure of 
nutritional or economic value." 

Ocean Spray, which started 
printing nutritional labels on its 
products 15 years ago, is calling for 
a "level playing field" with respect 
to regulations. It proposes requir- 
ing labels that would state both 
juice content and nutritional value 
for all juice products, both diluted 
and nondiluted. 

Surgeon General Everett C. Koop 
favors full disclosure labeling for 
all processed food products. Cur- 
rently, however, only producers of 
fortified products are required to 
list nutritional information on their 








Norosac Herbicide is unparalleled in controlling weeds and grasses in young fruit trees, 
nursery stock, blackberries, cranberries, raspberries and blueberries 

CAN YOUR PRESENT 

PRE-EMERGENT HERBICIDE 

DO ALL OF THESE? 




♦ Be applied over and 
through existing weed 
growth? 

♦ Kill existing vegetation? 

♦ Control annual weeds 
and grasses? 



♦ Control perennial weeds and 
grasses Including quackgrass 
and tiorsetall (Equlsetum)' 

* And can it last through 
the growing season 
with one application'^ 



NOROSAC 4G CAN.. AND DOES! 



m 



pbi/Gondon 
coRponabon > 



' 1217 WEST laTH STREET 
PO. BOX 4090 

KANSAS CITV, MISSOURI 64101 
816/421-4070 



NOROSAC 




Norosac' IS a registered trademark of PBI/Gordon Corporation 



: 1988. PBI/Gordon Corporation 



CRANBERRIES March 1989 Page 3 



labels. Congress would have to act 
to require full disclosure. 

The regulation requiring juice 
content labeling was adopted by 
the FDA in 1980 but it has not been 
enforced. 

Ocean Spray is part of a task 
force within the National Food 
Processors Association charged with 



examing labeling in general. The 
NFPA is composed of both large 
and small companies, from the well 
known Heinz to the specialized Maui 
Pineapple. 

Together, the trade association 
companies represent more than 30 
percent of juice sales nationally. 



QSSDMQIi 



Consumer Group Spokesman Labels 
Ocean Spray Proposal a 'Red Herring' 



One consumer group that Ocean 
Spray apparently won't be able to 
count on in its battle for so-called 
full disclosure labeling is the 
Center for Science in the Public 
Interest. 

Bruce Silverglade, a staff attor- 
ney for the consumer interest 
organization, called Ocean Spray's 
stance in behalf of juice content 
labeling for all juices— both diluted 
and nondiluted— a "red herring" 
and "misleading." 

"The issue is not the amount of 
water present in a juice, but the 
amount that comes out of the tap," 
he declared. 



Reached by phone at his 
Washington, D.C., office, Silver- 
glade said his organization is in 
favor of the FDA enforcing the 
juice content label requirement this 
year. 

"Groups like mine have been try- 
ing to get nutritional labeling for 
12 years," he said. 

But, he charged. Ocean Spray's 
current position "has less to do 
with public awareness, more with 
keeping the public in the dark." 

Juice content labeling, he said, 
could be enforced this year. Nutri- 
tional labeling he added, would 
require an act of Congress. 



NOTES 



WISCONSIN 

Should the state of Wisconsin regulate 
dams in cranberry bogs the way it does other 
dams? 

That's the heart of an issue now before the 
Wisconsin Supreme Court. Jeffrey and Bar- 
bara Tenpas, who own a cranberry marsh in 
Preston, are challenging a 1982 law that 
requires them to show financialresponsibilitv 
for maintaining a dam. 

Their lawyer, Byron C. Crowns of Wiscon- 
sin Rapids, argued in court that a financia 
responsibility provision is unnecessary. Ht 
added that such fees would be prohibitive fo 
some owners. 

He and Jeffrey and Barbara Tenpas cite ar 
1867 law authorizing owners of cranberr 
marshes to build and maintain cranberr 
marshes as necessary. 

Assistant Attorney General Maryann Sum 
said the growers should be treated the sami 
way as owners of other dams and shouli 
adhere to the same health and safet 
regulations. 

Crowns is also representing the Wisconsi* 
Cranberry Growers Association in the casen 



I 



22 years experience 



constructi on lifts ^^0^ 




AERlAmiFTING 



BERRy UfTim° 
I nylon berry bags 
I butk bins 

CRANBERRV 
GROWERS SpRViCE 



^STm^** mat renta/r&sa/es 




o MUV LlfTim 
urn MATS 

lightweight 
durable 



ccntact 
PETER - CHUCK 
508-295-2222 



Page 4 CRANBERRIES March 1989 



S«SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS «gS»B» B » Bi 8 5»«««««gBgy^:ff^p,^^ 





5SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS3SSSSSSSSSSSSSSS 

Level the Playing Field 

The one obvious purpose of product labels should be to 
inform the public. 

They should not be printed and glued to bottles and cans for 
the purpose of market advantage. 

And that's what Ocean Spray is concerned about regarding 
the FDA regulation on juice content labeling. 

Ocean Spray would have to display, let's say, that it uses 15% 
of its relatively moisture-free, highly acidic cranberry juice in 
its cranberry juice cocktail. 

On the other hand, the processor of a heavily water-laden 
juice, which might contain up to 85% water, could say his 
bottles hold 100% juice, thereby giving him a competitive 
advantage in the eye of the consumer. 

In addition, Ocean Spray says, a six-ounce serving of its 
cranberry juice cocktail contains 100% of the United States 
Recommended Dietary Allowance of vitamin C. On the other 
hand, an equivalent amount of the watery juice put out by our 
aforementioned processor might contain less than 2 percent of 
the RDA and he wouldn't even have to mention that. 

So, says Ocean Spray, let's level the playing field. Let's have 
full disclosure labeling. Let's give the facts on nutrition. And 
let's state how much juice is in all juice drinks, both those that 
are diluted and those that are not diluted. 

Sounds fair. 

Our sense, however, is that more than one consumer group 
will say, "We don't care about how much water already is in the 
juice. We only want to know how much water has been added." 

All right, then. Why not have full full disclosure? Why not 
disclose everything that's been added? And then why not also 
reveal the individual components in the end result — for both 
diluted and nondiluted drinks? Does this not level the playing 
field? 



WOLLSCHLAGER EXCAVATING 

Dragline Work — All Kinds 
Also Have Clam & Scalping Buckets 

Route 1 Nscedah, m 54646 

1-606-565-2436 



LETTERS 



WANTS ADDRESS 

In your January 1989 issue, page 10, your 
article refers to the election of directors of 
the Cranberry Institute, but does not include 
an address. I am interested in contacting 
this group for information and would 
appreciate an address. 
Thank you for your attention. 

Barbara Kemp 

Haga Cranberries 

Langlois, Ore. 

Editor's Note: The address is: 

The Cranberry Institute 

1101 Fifteenth St., N.W. Suite 202 

Washington, B.C. 20005 
The Cranberry Institute's telephone 
number is (202) 786-3232. 



^Vanted 

Wisconsin Cranberry 
Grower wisines to purchase 
an existing cranberry marsh. 

STEVE 

(715)421-0917 
(715)593-2385 



CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

SEND CORRESPONDENCE TO: 

P.O. BOX 249 

COBALT CT 06414 

(203) 342-4730 

PUBLISHER a EDITOR: BOB TAYLOR 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: CAROLYN GiLMORE 
(508) 763-5206 

ADVISORS & CORRESPONDENTS 

MASSACHUSETTS — Irving E Demoranville, 
Director. Cranberry Experiment Station. 

NEW JERSEY — Ptiilljp E. Marucci. Cranberry & Blueberry 
Specialist. Buddtown; Elizat>eth G. Carpenter, Chatswortti, 

NOVA SCOTIA — Robert A Murray. Horticulturist, Berry 
Crops, Research Station, Truro 

OREGON — Arttiur Poole, Coos County Extension Agent, 
Coquille. 

WASHINGTON — Azmi Y Stiawa, Horticulturist and 
Extension Agent in Horticulture, Coastal Wastiington 
Researcti & Extension Unit, Long Beach 

WISCONSIN — Tod D Planer, Farm Management Agent, 
Wood County 

CRANBERRIES !• publlthwj monthly by DIvenltlMj Psrlodl- 
cal>, Wellwyn Drive, Poniand CT 06480. Second clB>t pot- 
tage la paid at ttia Portland, Conn. Pott Otfica. Price It $1 5 a 
year, {28 lor two yaart, $2 a copy In Ilia U.S.; S17 a year in 
Canada; $20 a year In ail other countrlet. Bacli copiet: $2.50, 
Including pottage. Copyright 1988 by DiveniliedParkxiicait. 

ISSN: 0011-0787 

Poitmatler, tend Form 3749 to: 

CRANBERRIES 

P.O. BOX 249 

COBALT CT 06414 

CRANBERRIES March 1989 Page 5 



Some Needs for Cranberry and 
Blueberry Research in New Jersey 



By PHILIP E, MARUCCI 

Professor Emeritus, Rutgers University 

Recently the New Jersey Cran- 
berry & Blueberry Research Coun- 
nl requested that I suggest areas of 
research which I deem important 
for the future progress of the two 
fruit crops. 

The Ust of items below I consider 
to be a sort of "wish list" of work 
growers would like to have done. 
The obvious need for more research 
in breeding, nutrition and pesti- 
cides are not included since the 
council is already giving adequate 
attention to these subjects. This 
listing is not in the order of the 
importance or need of each item. 

1. Pruning of Cranberries. 

As I pointed out in a recent article 
in CRANBERRIES magazine, lit- 
tle is known about this important 



practice. The entire concept of 
nutrition of cranberries could 
change drastically if new, efficient 
methods of pruning could be deve- 
loped. The potential for increasing 
jdelds is great. 

2. Biological control of cran- 
berry insects. Harry Moulter and 
I got some promising results on 
Bog # 1 on the Rutgers Bogs, but the 
test had to be terminated when 
false blossom disease flared up. 
Some knowledge was obtained on 
the parasites of Sparganothis. This 
insect has so many host plants 
that it could easily be reared in the 
lab. It might be possible to rear 
parasites in large numbers for 
release in the field. 

Some interesting work in genetic 
engineering of Baccilus 
thuringiensis gives promise that 



strains of this bacteria could be 
developed to be more toxic to spe- 
cific insects. Much of this work is 
being done by private biopesticide 
companies. 



3. Manipulation of nests of 
solitary bees to supplement 
honey bee hives in blueberry 
and cranberry pollination. Easy . 

methods have been developed to 
colonize large numbers of individ 
ual nests of solitary bees in smal' 
wooden boxes. These bees are mucl: . 
more efficient pollinators than an . 
honey bees and even bumble bees . 
They work close to their nests. / ] 
team of Utah University an( 
USDFA apiculturists have been abl 
to rear a solitary bee (Osmis rib .\ 
ifloris) solely on blueberry poUei ^ 
and nectar. These bees may b 



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^ vines For sale x^ 



^.. 



Ben Lears $4,500 a ton 

Orders paid in advance 

by February 
receive a 10% discount. 

40 Tons Available 

Jonjak Cranberry Farm Inc. 
Hayward, Wisconsin 

Call Randy Jonjak 
(715) 634-3979 



TRUE VARIETIES 



Stevens $4,000 a ton 

Orders paid in advance 

by February 
receive a 10% discount. 

30 Tons Available 

Cranberry Springs Inc. 
Hayward, Wisconsin 

Call Stanley Roy Jonjak 
(715) 634-3044 
(715) 634-3286 



R Lvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv vvvvvv^ 
Page 6 CRANBERRIES March 1989 



I available commercially in a few 
years. (I am fascinated with the 
possibilities here and will be play- 
ing around with these little 

p creatures). 

4. Virus free blueberries. 

Growers are lamenting the decline 
; of the Jersey variety. They remember 
the enormous potential productive- 
ness of this cultivar when it was 
first introduced. It is still a good 
producer but does not bear the full 
clusters of large berries "in strings." 
They say that after an unspecified 
number of years, a variety "runs 
out." They believe this so strongly 
that they would like to see the orig- 
nal Jersey cross done again to 
start anew with the old-time Jer- 
sey. Jersey truly has lost its ability 
» produce. I feel the variety may 
low be generally infected with some 
lidden virus, probably a strain of 
)lueberry stunt disease, which does 
lot exhibit striking symptoms and 
:et weakens the plant, especially 
he floral structures. Similar ail- 
nents have existed in brambles 
md strawberries and remarkable 
, mprovements have been made with 
I drus free techniques. Methods of 
j liminating viruses without 
( lestroying tissues is now standard 
' n brambles and other crops. An 
ittempt should be made to gener- 
ite a stock of virus free Jerseys. 

5. The Early Black cranberry. 

t is apparent that the Early Black 
3 a complex of closely related plants. 



Pump Repairs 
& Sales 

All Types 

• Field Service 

• Chemigation Equipment 
Sold 

• Demonstration by 
Appointment 

AAA Industrial 
Pump Service Inc. 

Bruce Sunnerberg 

66 Lake Street 

Plympton, MA 02367 

(617)585-2394 



very similar in vine characteristics 
but varying in berry shape and 
size. On the same property with 
similar soils and cultural methods, 
one Early Black type will be con- 
sistently more productive than 
others. Isozyme studies may give 
some interesting offshoots. 

There is also the possibility that 
false blossom disease still exists in 
a mutated form in Early Blacks. 



This may account for the wide 
variation in size and seed counts of 
Early Black berries. Virological 
studies are needed. 

6. The bee kill problem of 
cranberries. Beekeepers have been 
complaining for several years that 
they are suffering high mortalities 
of bee hives placed out on cran- 
berry bogs for pollination. This 



Apply Now For The 1989 Season 

DeCran 
Integrated Pest Management 

Serving Massachusetts Cranberry Growers 



Experienced Consultants 
Scout Training 

Riglit to Know Training 

Insect and Weed Identification 

Botanical and Insect Reference li^ounts 

Pheromone Trap Kits: 
Cranberry Girdler 
Sparganothis Fruitworm 
Blackheaded Fireworm 

Updated Information on Latest Research and 
Developments in Cranberry Science 



Contact: 
Monika Schuler 
DeCran AG Supplies 
461 St. Mary's Pond Road ' 

Office: (508) 295-2731 
Evening: (508) 996-6120 



Our Acreage Is Limited So Sign Up Now! 



Vines For Sale 

Ben Lear $5,000 a ton 

Stevens $4,000 a ton 

Crowley $4,000 a ton 

Bergman $4,000 a ton 

Prices are F.O.B. 
$500 a ton iess witii 50% payment before cutting 



Richberry Farms Ltd. 



11280 Mellis Drive 
Richmond, B.C. 
V6X 1L7 Canada 



Res. (604) 273-4505 
Bus. (604) 273-0777 



CRANBERRIES March 1989 Page 7 



problem needs closer investigation. 
The present finding that chlordane 
£ind aldrin have been found in honey 
of hives set out on cranberries is 
imponderable. These chemicals have 
not been used on either cranberries 
or blueberries for more than 20 
years. 



7. Rotation of beehives on 
cranberries and blueberries. The 

recent switch to earlier withdrawal 
of the winter flood has generally 
brought about larger crops, but has 
also occasioned pollination failures. 
The placement of honey bee hives 
on the bogs in two separate com- 
plements instead of all at once has 
improved the percentage set of ber- 
ries. More precision in the timing of 
bee placements is necessary. The 
practicability of increasing the 
number of placements to three 
should also be considered. 

8. Inducing greater bee activ- 
ity on cranberry bogs by use of 
sprinklers. Many observers have 
noted a heightened foraging of bees 
immediately after a rain. It might 
be possible to improve bee visita- 
tions to cranberry and/or blue- 
berry flowers by sprinkling. Limited 
observations in 1986 showed that 
bee foraging could be shifted from 
one bog to another by running 
sprinklers on bogs already well 
pollinated, while keeping bogs more 
in need of bees unsprinkled. 

9. Establishment of new bogs. 

Fumigation procedures and new 
planting and fertilization techniques 
give promise of quicker establish- 
ment and production of new plant- 
ings. Lee Brothers' experiences in 
fumigation and Ernie Bowker's and 
Tom Budd's successful trials with 



WANTED 

10 to 15 acres of cranberry 
bogs in Plymouth County. 

Call John 
(617) 585-9577 



We Still Make House 

■ 'rt 1 1 Like your old family doctor, your Farm Credit representa- 

^_/ ^^ j^J[l^ tive still makes house calls . . . and he's been treating farm 
families like yours for a good 70 years. 
Farm families count on him to provide the financial support they need— short- 
term and long-term credit— that helps them plan for a productive future. 

But there's more to Farm Credit than money. What makes your Farm Credit 
representative unique is that he knows your business so well. Which means that 
he's more than a dependable source of credit. He can provide farm business 
consulting, tax services, credit life insurance, appraisal service and computer- 
ized record-keeping. 
Give him a call. He could be just what the doctor ordered for you. 

Southern New England 
Farm Credit Service 




Federal Land Bank Association 
Production Credit Association 

J f P.O.Box? 

Taunton, MA 02780 
508/824-7578 









SERVICES 



Herbicides 
Applied 

Custom Pruning 
Custom Ditching 



Sanding 

Wiping 

Wet Harvesting 

Mowing 

(Mowing includes 
Hydraulic Arm 
Flail Mower.) 



West Wareham, Ask for Rick at 
Massachusetts 295-5158 



K 



Page 8 CRANBERRIES March 1989 



setting out rooted cuttings and 
"sticks" (unrooted cuttings) with 
tomato planters encourage further 
testing. The economy of greenhouse 
propagation of rooted cuttings ver- 
sus outside propagating beds ver- 
sus purchase of expensive vines 
should be accounted. 

10. Sheep Pen Hill Disease of 
Blueberry. The fundamental 
research to find the pathogen or 
pathogens is the right approach 
and is progressing. However, once 
the pathogen is found, another long 
range study to determine the vector 
will further extend the time for the 
eventual control of the disease. This 
is demoralizing to growers who are 
in dire need of a quicker solution. 
Since a virus, fungus, bacterium or 
nematode, singly or in combina- 
tion, is probably the cause of SPHD, 
it is not illogical to start "shotgun 
■treatments" with pesticides known 
to be effective against these orga- 
lisms. More work is also needed on 
i^arietal resistance to SPHD. Patriot, 



which is known to be resistant to 
some root rots, might be a good 
candidate. 

11. The "Red Bluecrop" 
problem. This has already been 
designated by the council as a 
serious problem. I am repeating it 
as a matter of emphasis. This almost 
fatal flaw in the most important 
commercial variety is becoming 



more general every year. Last year 
a small grower in Pemberton was 
not able to make a single picking of 
his Bluecrop which actually bore a 
good crop of berries, which were 
still not blue in October. Some large 
growers had to leave many blue- 
berries impicked after second or third 
picking. The largest growers (Gal- 
letta), when asked if they had the 
problem, replied, "We invented it." 




BAG COMPANY L 

INC ^ 1804 EDISON ST. BOX B, ANTIGO, WIS. 54409-0116 

PHONE 715/627-4826 

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Office: (904) 734-7798 
736-3841 
734-5043 



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General Manager 734-3276 Evenings 
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Best of Show in 
Photo Contest 
Goes to Kiernan 

By CAROLYN GILMORE 

Ricky Kiernan won best of show in 
the Cape Cod Cranberry Growers' 
Association's recent color photography 
contest for his fall cranberry land scene 
titled "Tihonet." 

He also won a first place in the wild- 
flowers /scenes category with the same 
photo. 

Georgia D. Chamberlain placed first 
in the harvest category for a photo- 
graph of activity on a wet picked bog. 

Helen Nolan placed first in wildlife, 
capturing on film geese on a wet picked 
bog. 

In the harvest category, Lisa Kinebon 
placed second and Helen Nolan placed 
third. In wildhfe. Skip Sellon placed 
second and Steve Beaulieu was third. 
Kirby Gilmore placed second and Lau- 
rene Gerrior third in the wildflowers 
category. 

The contest, the theme of which was 
"Cranberry Culture Is Good for the 
Environment," drew more than 150 



entries depicting the environmentally 
enhancing qualities of this field of 
agriculture. The photos are to be used 



for various promotional and educationad 
activities sponsored by the Cape Cod 
Cranberry Growers Association. 



Vines For Sale 

Ben Lear $3,500 a ton 

Stevens $3,500 a ton 

Crowley $3,500 a ton 

Le Munyon $3,500 a ton 

Searles $3,500 a ton 

$500 a ton less with 50% payment before cutting 

David Zawistowski, Owner 
6031 County Highway D (715) 479-4658 
Eagle River, Wl 54521 (715) 479-6546 



[M^^J^%vv^^KV^»^vVvvv%^^J^^i^^S ! .^^^ 



! 






K Ag Laboratories International, Inc. 

2323 Jackson Street 
Oshkosh, Wl 54901 

* Cranberry Soil Analysis 

* Cranberry Vine Analysis 

* Cranberry Water Analysis, 
Usage & Interpretation 

* Liquid & Dry Fertilizer 
Recommendation 

* Soil Problems & Consultation 

* Seminars 

* Cranberry Crop Monitoring 
Program,, testing and 
monitoring nutrient status 
with 30 day intervals during 
during the growing season. 



Serving Cranberry 
Growers in U.S.A. 
& Canada since 1984 

Over 20 years 
of Experience on 
Acid Soil Interaction 



K Ag Laboratory has 
run over 30,000 
cranberry soil and over 
17,500 cranberry vines 
tests since 1984, and 
gave fertihzer 
recommendations with 
great success. 



Highly computerized cranberry soil, tissue and water testing program in 
U.S.A. and Canada. 

For more information contact: Dr. Akhtar Khwaja, Ph.D. 

Certified Professional Soil Scientist 
Certified Professional Agronomist 

Phone Number 414-426-2220; Out ot Wl 1-800-356-6045; FAX 414-426-2222 



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Page 10 CRANBERRIES March 1989 



Weather 



MASSACHUSETTS 

December was just slightly cooler than nor- 
mal. Maximum temperature was 58° degrees 
on the 7th and the minimum was -1° degree 
on the 12th. Generally, the second and third 
weeks were cold, the balance of the month 
normal or above. 

Precipitation totaled 1.37 inches, nearly 3 
inches below normal. This is the third lowest 
in our records, with only 1 985 and 1 955 lower. 
There was measurable precipitation on seven 
jays, with no large storms. Snowfall was only 
t inches. 

For the year 1988, temperatures averaged 
ust a snitch below normal. Months substan- 
ially warmer than normal were February, 
ilarch, August (warmest in nearly 50 years) 
ind November. Months substantially cooler 
vere January, April, September and October. 
Maximum temperature was 91° in August, 
'he minimum was -8° in January. 
Precipitation totaled 44.84 inches or about 
inches below normal. The only months with 
ubstantlally above normal precipitation were 
ebruary, July (a record) and November (most 
1 over 40 years). January, April, May, August, 
eptember and December were all much 
elow normal. Snowfall was 1/3 below nor- 
ial. Sunshine was above normal. 

I.E.D. 



Obituary 

Ralph E. Quillen 

Ralph E. Quillen of Dartmouth, Mass., a 
former employee of the A.D. Makepeace Co., 
died Jan. 2 at the age of 66. 

A native of Clarksville, Del., he was the 



husband of the late Natalie (Bumpus) QuiUen. 

Quillen was a World War II Army vete- 
ran. Survivors include three brothers, two 
sisters and several nieces and nephews. 

Memorial donations may be made to the 
First Congregational Church in New 
Bedford. 



Financial Strength. . . 

Personalized Service. 

Isn't That What You Need In A Bank? 



The Jackson County Bank 
has supported agriculture in the 
area for more than 110 years. 

We recognize the importance 
of the cranberry industry and are 
pleased to provide finanical ser- 
vices for all your banking needs. 



We're large enough to serve 
you and yet we offer personal- 
ized service which your busi- 
ness demands. 

The Jackson County Bank. A 
name to count on throughout 
the years. 



HmSSj th Jth dilletova. 



JACKSON 
COUNTY 

D#4PIIV 1715) 2B4 U4I 
Black River Falls. Alma Cenler, Hixlon. Merrillan. Taylor. Wl S46I5 




MTC 



MIDDLEBOROUGH 
TRUST COMPANY 




The Business Bank. 

MTC offers you business banking built to your needs. 

Personal attention to your special 

financial requirements now and as you grow. Cooperatioa 

Flexibility. Complete business and personal banking. 

Member FDIC 

f=t Main Office 

UnS 10 John Glass, Jr. Square, Middleborough 

Branch Offices 

Middleboro Square, Rt. 28, Middleborough • Middleboro Plaza, Middleborough 
Cranberry Plaza, East Wareham • Carver Square, Carver • Trucchi's Plaza, Taunton 

Telephone all offices 947-1313 



i 



CRANBERRIES March 1989 Page 11 





Inc. 



* Complete line of cranberry herbicides, fertilizers, pesticides, fungicides, 
miticides. In stock when you want them. 

* Best application and safety equipment for your needs. 
■k Quality aerial applications. 

* Proven frost warning equipment. Don't take chances — buy the best. 

* Experienced cranberry consulting service offering pheromone traps and 
baits. 

* Right to know training. 

■* Culvert Pipe — All sizes — steel, aluminum, and poly. 

* Ditch Mud Mats — Strong — lightweight — durable. 

* Burlap Picking Bags — Best for your money. 

* Sanding by helicopter. 



John C. Decas 

William D. Chamberlain 

461 Mary's Pond Rd. 
Rochester, MA 02770 

Office: 295-2731 
Evening: 763-8956 
Fax:(508)291-1417 



Serving Massachusetts Cranberry Growers 



I 



I 



Office 
295-2222 



CRAHBERRY 
GROWERS SERVICE 



»f. 



.^n 






."* 




D. Beaton 
888-1288 

COMPLETE BOG 
MANAGEMENT 

I HARVESTING 
(Wet & Dry) 



Specializing in 

• NETTING 

• SANDING 



^^' 



9^- 



K. Beaton 
295-2207 



\ 



P. Beaton 
947-3601 

DITCHING 



CUSTOM 

HERBICIDE 

APPLICATION 




Complete line of portable Crisafulli Pumps 2 " - 16" 
Plastic netting for suction boxes 



II 



J 



Page 12 CRANBERRIES March 1989 




evrinol. 



TheGende 
Herbicide for 
Cranberries. 



With gentle protection, DEVRINOr 
10-G herbicide provides broad-spec- 
trum weed control of over 40 broadleaf 
weeds and grasses, including nutsedge. 
DEVRINOL gives you long-lasting control 
throughout the season. And it's easy to 
apply-on the ground or in the air 

For more information, see your dealer 
or call the ICI Information Line: 
1-800-759-2500. 

Always read and follow label directions 
carefully 




gw 





[Labeled nutsedge control in Massachusetts and New Jersey only See label for specific recommendations j 





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Plymouth Copters, Ltd. 



Growers fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides applied to growers specifications 

Mud Lifting - Cranberry Ufting 

Mats Available 



Plymouth Airport 

Box 3446 

Plymouth, MA 02361 



David J. Morey 

Richard H. Sgarzi 

(508) 746-6030 



Agricultural Applications • Lift VJork • Executive Charters • Aerial Photography 



: 



CRANBERRIES March 1989 Page 13 



K Ag Labs Slates 
Cranberry Seminar 

K Ag Laboratories International of Osh- 
kosh, Wise, has slated an East Coast Cran- 
berry Seminar for April 8 from 9 a.m. to 3 
p.m. at the Sheraton Plymouth in Plymouth, 
Mass. 

Included in the seminar will be a 200-8lide 
presentation on various asiiects of cran- 
berry production. 

The seminar will be free for growers who 
participated in the K Ag fertilizer program 
during the 1988 season. The fee will be 
$28.50 for those not using K Ag who register 
by March 15. On site r^istration wiU cost $38.50. 

K Ag will provide lunch. 

Registration will be held from 9 through 
9:30 a jn. Coffe and doughnuts will be served. 

Below is the program: 

9:30-9:45 — Soil fertility and plant nutri- 
tion status of cranberry bogs in Massachu- 
setts; E)r. A. Khwaja. 

9:45-10 — Role of nitrogen, phosphorus, 
potassium, calcium, boron fertilizer in 
cranberry production; Khwaja. 

10-10:30 — Role of metal such as copper, 
iron, manganese, zinc, aluminum in cran- 
berry production; Khwaja. 

10:30-10:45 — Coffee break. 

10:45-11:30 — Various plant growth fac- 
tors and how they affect cranberry produc- 
tion under Massachusetts cranberry soil 
conditions; Khwaja. 

11:30-12 — Herbicides and other chemi- 
cals, their effects on cranberry production 



and chemical cleanup using bio-technology; 
Khwaja. 

12-1 — Lunch. 

1-1:45 — Small fruit physiology and how 
to increase the size of berries; Dr. Harry 
Rajamannon. 

2-2:30 — Cranberry water and the effect of 
various water nutrients on soil, plant tissue 
and the overall production of crcinberries; 
Khwaja. 

2:30-3 — Grower questions and answers. 



DOW CHEMICAL 
APPROVES NEW 
RESEARCH CENTER 

A $35.5 agricultural research center to be 
located in Midland, Mich., was approved 
recently by the Dow Chemical Company 
board of directors. 

Construction is slated to begin in July 
and completion is set for August 1991. 



^- t;*j 



'^m^r/if^^'i rjrii^ r/^^^i tvr "^i-M iV/r^-'- /v 



J. A . JENKINS & SON CO.\ 

Grower Service 



MOWING (ALL TYPES) 
SANDING 



DITCHING 
WEED WIPING 



Serving Cape Cod 

227 Pine St., W. Barnstable, Ma. 02668 

Phone 362-6018 



pai»»«»AWWftgtM^^i«^^ 



•'.r.^^^>*r. 




Ifi. 



Page 14 CRANBERRIES March 1989 



Harry C. Burgess Remembered 



♦ 

♦ 



By LARRY COLE 

Harry C. Burgess, 1899-1989 

On Monday, Jan. 9, one of our most 
dedicated cranberry growers passed 
away. 

Harry was the proverbial farmer, 

working hard from dayHght to dark six 

and seven days a week. He never pushed 

his workers but led them; a man that 

was inclined to be indifferent toward 

work soon found himself in the way 

and would go looking for an easier job. 

Each of his bogs was among the best 

tept in Massachusetts and absolutely 

iveed free. In the the early 1930s he 

Dought an abandoned bog in Duxbury 

)f 15 to 18 acres. It was a mess, growing 

n abundance every imaginable weed. 

rhen the only weed killer was iron sul- 

)hate and salt for ferns along the 

litches. But within a very few years the 

)og was weed free and stayed that way. 

Both Harry's father and grandfather 

vere growers. His father was a busi- 

less merchant shipping out cranber- 

ies under an old Plymouth Rock label 

i'hen Larry was a youngster. Later on, 

is trademark was the Red Star brand. 

'ather and son made an excellent team. 

larry was very particular about the 

uality of his fruit and his Howes were 

xactly what his father needed for his 

ustomers in Chicago and on the West 

!oast. 

At a time when 50 to 60 bbls. to the 
ere was considered a fair crop, he was 
aising a bbl. to the rod. He never 
liked about the size of his crops, but 
nyone that worked for him was well 
ware of them. He picked only by the 
our, for picking by the bushel encour- 



CRANLAND 
SERVICES 

Cranberry Property 

Appraisals 

• ••••• 

Listings and Sales of 

Cranberry Properties. 

License # 68987 



Lawrence W. Pink 

Old Cordwood Path 

Duxbury, MA 02332 

(617) 934-6076 



aged the workers to be too hard on his 
vines and berries. 

Harry was quiet and a bit shy. He 
never offered advice but was always 
available to go over any grower's prob- 
lems. Living nearby, he was my unoffi- 
cial state bog agent in my own early 
years as a cranberry grower. His advice 
was sure to be correct or he wouldn't 
give it. 

In 1928, he married Gladys Eames, 
who survives him. They didn't have 
children but many nieces and nephews. 
She also shared her love with the many 
students she taught in the Carver Pub- 
lic School for nearly 40 years. 

Harry represented the best of the old- 
time growers. He was a good neighbor, 
minded his own business, worked hard 
and possessed unquestioned integrity. 



♦ 
♦ 

♦ 

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NIemI 

Electric 

Company 




Robert 
Niemi 

Electrical 
Contractors 



Heat, Light & Power Wiring 

• RESIDENTIAL 

• COMMERCIAL 
• INDGSTRIAL 

Pinehurst Drive 

Wareham, Mass. 

TEL. 295-1880 



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^^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦t 



B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 



High Voluine Trailer Pumps B 



• 12 to 16" discharge 
•20' tongue 

• PTO shaft with 

marine bearing 



PMIHelmt 
weOBKlSt.N. 
Wlseonsln Rspids Wl 

54494 
(715) 421-09t7 



'1] II ■ ■ e B n n H n B B a nil HI] e g Bi D H a D g il^ 




CONSULTING ENGINEERS 
SURVEYORS 



Extensive experience in all aspects of cranberry 
land development: evaluation, purchase, survey, 
design, permit acquisition, phased construction and 
planting both in wetlands and uplands. 

Have references. Will travel. 

Contact: Will Lee 

10948 Highway 54 East 
Wisconsin Rapids, Wl 54494 
(715)424-3131 



CRANBERRIES March 1989 Page 15 




Two Fabulous 
Party Dishes 
That Will Malce 
You Famous! 

Any woman knows it's easy to build 
a reputation as a fabulous cook. All it 
takes is one or two foolproof recipes 
that result in delicious food that looks 
absolutely scrumptious. 

Here are two reputation-building 
recipes for you to treasure as you would 
your family silver. The first, an utterly 
elegant Cranberry Glazed Liver Pate, 
to be served with thin toast fingers. 
Consider this ambrosial combination: 
delicately smooth pate, decorated with 
a ruby glaze of zesty cranberry juice 
cocktail and cranberry-orange relish, 
tempered with just a touch of dry white 
wine. 

Umm, could anything be more delec- 
table? Perhaps. You might regard 
Triple-Layer Cranberry Molded Salad 
as a triple-threat contender. There's a 



cranberry layer with the added zest of 
cabbage and carrots, a ham layer feat- 
uring the surprise of water chestnuts 
and chilies, and a chicken layer that 
includes mandarin oranges. All in all, 
a delightful melange of flavors and 
textures. 

Happily, both dishes can be ready 
and waiting long before the party beg- 
ins. The party will make your reputation! 

Cranberry Glazed 
Liver Pate 

(serves 12) 

1 envelope unflavored gelatin 

1 cup cranberry juice cocktail 

1/2 cup dry >vhite >vine 

1/3 cup cranberry-orange relish from 

a 14 ounce jar 
1 can (2 pounds, 2 ounces) liver pate, 

chilled 
Toast Angers 

Sprinkle gelatin over cranberry j uice and let 
soften. Stir in white wine. Chill until mix- 
ture thickens slightly and has consistency 
of unbeaten egg whites. Fold in relish. 
Remove pate from can. With a knife, scrape 
off the fat from the outside of the pate. Place 
pate on a rack placed over a shallow pan. 
Spoon cranberry mixture over pate, allow- 
ing it to run over pate to coat completely. 
Chill until gelatin coating is firm. Repeat 
coating until all cranberry mixture is used. 
Chill until firm. Cut into slices and serve 
with toast fingers. 



Cranberry Supper Salad 

(makes one 4 quart mold) 

Cranberry Layer: 

2 envelopes unflavored gelatin 

3 cups cranberry juice cocktail 



1/2 cup cranberry -orange relish from 

14 ounce jar 
1 cup shredded green cabbage 

1 cup shredded carrots 

Ham Layer: 

2 envelopes unflavored gelatin 

3 cups pineapple juice 

2 cups diced, cooked ham 

1 can (5 ounces) water chestnuts, sliced 

1 can (4 ounces) sweet green chilies, 
drained and diced 

Chicken Layer: 

2 envelopes unflavored gelatin 

3 cups condensed chicken broth 
1/4 cup lemon juice 
1/2 cup chopped celery 

1 can (11 ounces) mandarin oranges, 
drained 

2 cups diced, cooked chicken 
Chicory 
Mayonnaise 

To prepare cranberry layer: sprinkle 



The 

CHARLES W.HARRIS 

Company 

451 Old Somerset Avenue 

North Dighton, Mass. 

Phone 824-5607 

AMES 

Irrigation Systems 

RAIN BIRD 

Sprinklers 

HALE 

Pumps 

Hlshest Qutlhn Pfoduefi 
With Sstlsf teflon Gumnteed 






a 

(IT) 

iliiiii 

illeli 
1/2, 



PORTABLE MICROSCOPES 

Professional, inexpensive microscopes for 
examination of plants in the field for: 

SOUTHERN RED MITE * PARASITIZED FRUITWORM EGGS 
NEMATODES * TIPWORM LARVAE IN UPRIGHTS 

Two models, 25x fixed or 18-36x variable 
magnification. Sold with a 20-day trial guarantee. 
Call for our complete catalog, references, prices. 

PEST MANAGEMENT SUPPLY INC. 

P.O. BOX 938 

AMHERST, MA 01004 

800 272-7672 

, 413 253-3747 (in Mass.) 





I 



"Htpan 



«ren 



Page 16 CRANBERRIES March 1989 




invert on a platter. Garnish with bite-size 
pieces of chicory or other salad greens. 



Place a bowl of mayonnaise in center of 
mold and serve at once. 



^ ^ ♦ ^ ♦a»a» s i « g ^ r »z^r^s^ g ig^s i g i g^T<» T< » T ^ ^ 



EMPTING PARTY FOODS include elegant Cranberry Glazed Liver Pate and Triple-Layer Cran- 
erry Molded Salad. These brightly hued and wonderfully flavorful treats can be made well in 
ivance of the festivities. 

latin into 1/2 cup of the cranberry juice 

id let soften. Place over low heat and stir 

itil gelatin is dissolved. Add to remaining 
llanberry juice. Chill until slightly thick- 
It ed. Fold in relish, cabbage and carrots. 
1 ur into 4 quart mold and chill until firm. 

') prepare ham layer: sprinkle gelatin 
. ;o 1/2 cup of the pineapple juice and let 
jiften. Place over low heat and stir until 
Iglatin is dissolved. Stir into remaining 
Fieapple juice. Chill until slightly thick- 
esd. Fold in ham, water chestnuts and chi- 
lis. Slowly pour over cranberry layer and 
c 11 until firm. 

1 prepare chicken layer: sprinkle gelatin 
i o 1 /2 cup of the chicken broth. Place over 
■c/ heat and stir until gelatin is dissolved, 
^d to remaining chicken broth. Stir in 
eion juice. Chill until slightly thickened. 
? d in celery, oranges and chicken. Care- 
i y pour over ham layer and chill until 
in. Unmold by dipping into lukewarm 
vter for a few seconds. Tap to loosen and 



Massachusetts Groivers 

Financial assistance is available for SCHOLARSHIPS and MEDICAL 
ASSISTANCE for Cranberry Growers, their Employees and the 
families of both when financial need can be shown. For information 
contact: 

URANN FOUNDATION 
P.O. Box 1788 
Brockton MA 02403 

Telephone 588-7744 



CRANBERRIES March 1989 Page 17 



FACTS ABOUT FAX 



By JOSEPH ARKIN 

Efficient long distance commun- 
ication systems have become 
essential for the modern business 
enterprise. 

Long distance telephone calls meet 
the need for direct voice communi- 
cations. TWX and Telex telegra- 
phic systems electronically trans- 
mit and receive written messages. 

But these systems remain inade- 
quate for those firms with the need 
to transmit accurate copies of mes- 
sages, data or graphics. Managers 
confronting that need should become 
familiar with facsimile — or fax — 
systems. 

Resembling an office copier, a 
fax unit sends and receives docu- 
ment copies over ordinary telephone 
lines. The receiver gains a copy of 
the sender's document in its origi- 
nal, unchanged form. So, fax meets 
the need to transmit "time critical" 
docments that have to be moved 
quickly. 

Facsimile transmission systems 
have been available for many years. 
Indeed, the technology underlying 
facsimile systems date back over 
140 years. But several considera- 
tions have restricted the widespread 
use of fax machines in the past. 

First, fax machines used to be 
prohibitively expensive for many 
businesses. The price of a fax unit 
ranged between $15,000 and $20,000. 



cv^^^^mIiy 




COMPUTER, INC. 
CRANWARE 

• Growers 

• Handlers 

• Chemical Applicotions 

• Chemical Resale 

(508) 291-1192 

2 Tobey Rood, Worehom, MA 02571 



That restricted their use to larger 
businesses with bigger budgets. 

Second, facsimile systems were 
slow. Transmitting a single page of 
information took as long as six 
minutes. 



Moreover, the transmission pro- 
cess remained a noisy, cumbersome 
operation that easily discouraged 
the user. And the reproduction pro- 
cess left the recipient with a poor 
quality facsimile of the original. 



Equipment Inc. 



381 West Grove Street (Rte. 28) 
Middleboro, MA 02346 



KUBOTR ^'"'' 

Tractors 2 & 4 wheel drive — 12-90 hp. 

Compact Excavators 1 '/? to 6 ton 

Wheel Leaders '/? to % yd. 

Water Cooled Diesel Engines 4 to 104 hp. 

All Types of Implements 

Polymark Beaver-Mowers 947-6299 

Specialty Fabrication Work 

Kubota Financing as Low as 8V?% 

*Sales ^Service *Parts ^Leasing 

mt<y^ "O^ OK 0*S« ^OK -fcO^ 






H; 



%^i4^e^ 3i)^ Sfitie/ 



Early Blacks 

Stevens 

Howes 



Crowley 



$2,500 a ton 
$4,000 a ton 
$2,500 a ton 
$3,500 a ton 



Prices P.O. B. 



R.M. Lawton Cranberries, Inc. 

221 Thomas St. 

Middleboro, MA 02346 

(508) 947-7465 



Page 18 CRANBERRIES March 1989 



Together, the disadvantages offset 
Jhe bulk of the benefits expected 
from the fax system. 

INNOVATIONS in recent years 
have overcome these disadvantages. 
Today's fax systems are more efficient 
than previous models. Transmissions 
over ordinary telephone lines typically 
take less than one minute. Some take 
only a few seconds. 

Moreover, modern systems have 
improved reproduction quaUty dram- 
atically. The better systems can pro- 
duce high resolution copies instead of 
blurred facsimiles. Recipients gain an 
accurate, reliable copy of the original. 

The price for modem facsimile sys- 
«ms also has fallen to a level even 
small businesses can afford.* Techno- 
ogical advances have dropped the price 
or efficient fax systems to an average 
)f $2,500. Even top of the line machines 
un no more than $4,500. 

The lower prices make the systems 
nore attractive for small businesses 
vith the persistent need to transmit 
iccurate copies efficiently. As prices 



continue to drop, manufacturers expect 
that many people will buy fax units for 
personal use in the home. Some expect 
fax units to become as common in the 
home as personal computers. 

Operating simplicity now adds to the 
other attractions inherent in modem 
fax systems. Other than the terminal 
itself, the user needs only an electrical 
outlet and a telephone. Nor does any 
special training become necessary to 
operate a fax unit. The sender follows 
three simple steps: 

1) place the original into the fax 
unit's document feed; 

2) dial the telephone number for the 
receiving unit; 

3) after making the connection , press 
the fax button to transmit the copy. 

In a few seconds, the receiving unit 
prints out an exact replica of the sender's 
original. 

The process is even easier for the 
recipient. All fax units operate as 
transceivers. A single unit can both 
send and receive transmissions. And 
no one needs to be present when a unit 
receives a transmission. 



The recent innovations have raised 
the number of fax units in operation to 
over 500,000. The industry projects a 
100 percent increase in that total by 
1990. The comparative advantage fax 
offers over other communication sys- 
tems may make the increase even larger. 

MANY managerg continue to rely on the 



CRANBERRY 

GROWERS 

REALTY 

Listings of buyers and 

sellers welcomed on 

cranberry acreage 

and upland. 

Appraisals 

DOUGLAS R. BEATON 

E. Sandwich, Mass 

02537 

(617)888-1288 



*Fax machines can be rented, too 



CAS0R0rr4G 

Effective control of broadleafs and grasses. 

If you're looking for a way to control tough weeds, 
your choice should be Casoron 4G. It's effective 
against a broad spectrum of broadleafs and ^^v?. 

grasses, it's economical, and comes -«^.*^^'^>'^ 

in easy-to-use granular form. 



UNIROYAL 
CHEMICAL 



Casoron is a Reg. TM of 
Uniroyal Chemical Company. Inc. 

Please read and follow all 
label instructions carefully. 




CRANBERRIES March 1989 Page 19 



mail to deliver important business docu- 
ments. Yet, the post office requires several 
days to deliver the same information fax 
can deliver in only a few seconds. And fax 
travels directly to its destination. The mail 
must pass through collection boxes, sub- 
stations, airports and carriers. 

Using fax may cost more than a postage 
stamp. But the difference in cost easily may 
become immaterial. When using fax, you 
pay only for the price of the phone call each 
time you send a document. And that pro- 
vides a link with fax transceivers world- 
wide, 24 hours every day. 

Fax enjoys the same advantages over 
messenger and courier services. You need 



VINES FOR SALE 



Howes and 
Early Blacks 



CALL 



(617)428-6101 

Or 

(617)428-0907 

After 6 p.m. 




O^^M 



Equipment, inc. 



381 West Grove St. (Rte. 28) 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

(508) 947-6299 

^KUBOTR 

Tractors, Excavators and 
Diesel Generators 



® 



pYOTE 

Wheel Loaders 
3/4 Yd - 6 1/2 Yd 




Screening Equipment 



not wait for overnight delivery. Fax can 
accomplish the same task in a few seconds. 
Anywhere you can reach by telephone can 
become a fax transceiver station for the effi- 
cient, accurate exchange of information. 

Facsimile transmission systems edso enjoy 
some clear advantages over Telex/TWX 
systems. In any comparison, f£ix enjoys an 
advantage when considering cost-per- 
message unit. But the real benefit from fax 
comes from the savings in the preparation 
of materials prior to transmission. 

The Telex/TWX user must manually type 
each page before the actual transmission. 
For a multi-page document, input time can 
take hours. The input also remains subject 
to likely keyboard errors. The fax user simply 
transmits a copy of the original document. 

Moreover, sending drawings or other 
graphic material over Telex/TWX systems 
remains impossible. Fax systems send an 
exact copy of any information you can put 
on a sheet of paper. That includes copies of 
typed letters, handwritten notes, contracts, 
graphs, charts, sales orders, blueprints and 
photographs. That potential makes fax more 



flexible, yet less expensive in terms of the 
staff time necessary to complete transmis- 
sions. 

Of course, a fax unit must contribute to a 
firm's profits before its acquisiton makes 
sense. That contribution develops any time 
the transmission of an accurate facsimile 
helps close a sale, reduce expenses or enable 
the business to operate more efficiently. 

Different companies produce competing 
facsimile systems. And different systems 
have different features. So, you should sort 
out what options can benefit your business 
when comparing the alternatives. 

Technicians use Bits Per Second (BPS) as 
the criterion for measuring fax speed. Higher 
BPS means faster fax speed. Use BPX in a 
manner analogous to MPG for car shoppers. 

Next, determine the communications 
capability a particular fax unit has com- 
pared to other units. Standards set by the 
Consultative Committee for International 
Telephone and Telegraphy (CCITT) deter- 
mine that capability. 

The CCITT created three groups, which 
describe compatibility between fax units. 




WISCONSIN CRANBERRY 
HEADQUARTERS FOR 
SEVINXLR 



DEVRINOL 10G * EVITAL ♦ GUTHION 
DIAZINON 14G • PARATHION • ETHREL 

Cole/Grow^er Service 

537 Atlas Ave., P.O. Box 7211, Madison, Wl 53707 
(608) 221-6204 or 1-800-362-8049 




^.^.^.^.m. T 



^^^■'■'■'■'■'''■'•'■^'■*'-*-'-'^^'^**'-'^'^'^**'^'-*^**'"- i-i-i.*« »»< 



ht}i0thn Supplies 

• 2" to 12" PVC Pipe with Fittings 

• Quick Couple Risers 

• Felker Aluminum Flumes & Culverts 

Replace old aluminum mains with government approved 4", 6" 
and 8 " polyethylene pipe buried just below bog surface. No insert 
fittings. Rent our butt fusion welder for a continuous main line. Beat 
the high cost of custom installation by renting our small 4-wheel 
drive tractor with mole hole plow for buried laterals. 

STEARNS IRRIGATION, INC. 

790 Federal Furnace Rd. 

Plymouth MA 02360 

Tel. (508) 746-6048 



Page 20 CRANBERRIES March 1989 



I 



Fax units in Group 1 had to be mutually 
cxjmpatible. And those included within 
Groups 2 and 3 also had to be compatible 
with each other. Group 1 remains the slow- 
est, Group 3 includes the fastest. 

Of course, manufacturers now produce 
ifax units that are universally compatible 
i with Groups 3, 2 or 1. These units can com- 
municate with most of the existing fax units 
in the world. 

When reviewing fax specifications, you 
also should note the resolution, which is 
rated in lines per inch (LPI). That number 
provides a measure of the quality of the 
transmission you can expect. The higher 
;he LPI, the better you can read the fine 



print. In any event, review copies of actual 
transmission before you buy any fax unit. 

Manufacturers also have developed many 
additional features, which enable all users 
to adapt fax to the unique requirements of 
their firms. Not every business needs every 
feature. But you should recognize the options 
avEiilable. 

Some fax models allow automatic dial- 
ing. The system remembers numbers the 



user dials frequently, ftessing a single but- 
ton redials one of those numbers. That 
becomes useful when a business regularly 
sends important messages to the same 
destinations. 

An automatic ans^ver feature allows 
unattended reception of documents. This 
feature makes facsimile a 24-hour a day 
communication device. 

— Arkin Magazine Syndicate 



Realty & Insurance 



Knowledge & ability to 

unite buyers and sellers 

for existing marshes or 

undeveloped land. 

2141 8th street South 

Wisconsin Rapids, 

Wisconsin 54494 

(715)423-6550 

^^^^^ ^IVtf ^^ 1011*1 WJUSWC 

REALTOR #F#W^9 OPPWIUHTV 



WAIVTED 

Gravel & Sand 

in the southeastern Massachusetts area 

Quantities of 10,000 yards and up 

Complete site work, bog construction and finistied 

contouring of surrounding area plus the best price 

for your material. 



Michael Coan 
Carver, Mass. 
(508) 866-5285 



Earl White 

Medfield, Mass. 

(508) 359-7291 



i m^LaBymaRMJiBJEJisjmaiyffiyflSJffi^^^^ 



^(^^^SHHk 



CRANBERRIES, INC. 



Vines For Sale 



Spring 1989 



Ben Lear 
Crowley 
Stevens 
Pilgrims 

Buy 10 tons, get one ton free. 
20% down payment with order. 
Call for large order pricing. 



^yi^y^ffi?'«^»^'?^1to^1l^^^^^^ 



$3,500.00 per ton 
$3,500.00 per ton 
$3,500.00 per ton 
$4,000.00 per ton 



Prices F.O.B. 



Contact: 
LeRoy Miles 

Northland Cranberries, Inc. 
(715)424-4444 
251 Oak Street 
Wisconsin Rapids, Wl 54494 



CRANBERRIES March 1989 Page 21 



y-^ ■ ■ * * ^ f 

i Vines For Sale k 

I Crowley $3,000 a ton I 

f Searles $2,500aton ' 

A 10% discount with 50% payment by March 15 A 

I Remainder due on delivery or picl<up B 

I G. BROCKMAN, INC. | 

y 4409 Brockman Road a 

i Vesper, Wl 54489 i 

I (715)423-0368 (715)423-7016 ■ 

Im^^^^^ -^^^ -^^^ -^^^ -^^^* -«. 



Law Offices of 

Q).^J(SLrcLE^arr^ 
0ames gX 0fari/o J 

24 Bay Road/P.O. Box 2899 

Duxbury, Massachusetts 02331 

617-934-6575 

Bog renovation and Bog development 

(Consenatlon Commission, DEQE, Mass EPA, EPA and Corps of Engineers) 

Business, retirement and estate planning 

(Incorporations and partnerships, pensions and profit sharing plans, and Wills 

and Trusts) 

Land disposition 

(Purchase, sale and financing of existing bogs and potential sites) 

Land use management 

(Board of Appeals and Planning Board) 





ABEL'S 
APIARIES 



^ojo^tuzriJie4<j(^ cro/lina&orv 

Call or Write: 

Abel's Apiaries 
P.O. Box 234 
Sydney, Florida 33587 
Phone (813) 659-0784 or 
(301)592-9712 



YANKEE 
PLANNERS, 
INC. 

59 North Main Street 

Middleboro, MA 02346 

(508) 947-0527 



Sound and Objective 

Advice 

Suited to 

Your Needs 



• Tax and Estate Planning 

• Investment & Insurance 

Review 

• Business Continuity 

• Asset Protection 

• Key Employee Retention 

• Business Tax Analysis 



Mr. William H. Bestgen, Jr. 

Chartered Financial Consultant 



Mr. Peter W, Hutehings 

Attorney at Law practicing as 
a Tax Attorney 



Mr. Roger H. Parent, Jr. 

Accountant, Enrolled to Practice 

before the Internal Revenue 

Service 



Call For Your Free Brochure 

(508) 947-0527 



Page 22 CRANBERRIES March 1989 




.<«i^*'^ 



fof Reli$ble Dtedies $n(l Pumps, 
Cmbeny Gi^omn Look to Cfh^fulli 

Your Crisafulli pumping equipment will be manufactured 
just for you, with your choice of power options and 
discharge size. If you need to dredge sand, call us for 
quotations and specifications. We will supply you with 
exactly what you need, not something designed for 
somebody else! For information, quotations, local 
representation, call: 



1 -800-442-7867 




or FAX 406-365-8088 




CRANBERRIES March 1989 Page 23 



Take Good 

Care of Yourself 

Have an Ocean Spray! 




The farmer's cooperative that brings you 
a wide range of natural fruit juices, drinks and sauces 

Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc., Plymouth, Massachusetts 02360 
An Equal Opportunity Employer 



i 




?0 89 



CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

April 1989 Vol. 53, No. 4 



c 




4 Million Barrel Crop ^^ 
Blocking Cold With Fabric 



The Craisins 



; 



I 



£00 TO WW 

isyfJHwy 

idaa siyiyas 

A>dwyaii ssyw jo ainr 



First 4 Million Barrel Crop 



GONG! 



By IRVING E. DEMORANVILLE 

Director, Massachusetts Cranberry 
Experiment Station 

The latest crop report from the New 
England Agricultural Statistics Service 
indicates a 1988 national cranberry crop 
of 4,0 19,00 barrels. 

Of course, that's not the final count. 
But if the data hold up, this would be the 
first 4 million barrel crop in the history 
of the industry. 

The 4,019,000 barrel figure represents 
a whopping 21 percent increase over 
1987. 



The Massachusetts cranberry crop is 
estimated at 1,910,000 barrels, 32 per- 
cent above '87 and a record. 

In fact, all of the leading cranberry 
grow^ing states except Washington posted 
a record crop and even that state showed 
an increase over '87. The increase: 3 
percent. 

Wisconsin was second to Massachusetts 
in production with 1,450,000 barrels. Its 
crop was 9 percent larger than 1987's. 

New^ Jersey show^ed an increase of 24 
percent with a total of 370,000 barrels. 

Oregon, with 154,000 barrels, was 8 1 
percent over 1987. 



I 

i 
\ 
\ 

! 
f 
f 



1 



Office 
295-2222 


CRANBERRY 
GROWERS SERVICE 


K. Beaton 
295-2207 


D. Beaton 
888-1288 


Specializing in 


P. Beaton 
947-3601 


COMPLETE BOG 
MANAGEMENT 


• NETTING 


• DITCHING 


HARVESTING 
(Wet & Dry) 


• SANDING 


• CUSTOM 
HERBICIDE 
APPLICATION 




Complete line of portable Crisafulli Pumps 2' 
Plastic netting for suction boxes 



16" 



J 



Page 2 CRANBERRIES April 1989 



I 



Spunbonded Fabric Covers: 
A Solution to Wintry Woes? 



By ELDEN J. STANG 

Professor of Horticulture 
University of Wisconsin/Madison 

Increasingly, growing competition 
ind concern for water resources 
luggest cranberry growers are likely 

face long term regulation and, in 

1 worst case scenario, restrictions 
m water use. 

The drought of 1988 served to 

ligh light again the critical need 

or water in cranberry production. 

' A major water use is flooding for 

I /inter protection, absolutely criti- 

ial in today's production scheme 

jr cranberries in Wisconsin. Equal- 

V important is adequate water for 

rest protection by sprinkler 

-rigation. 

Decades ago, researchers in Wis- 
onsin and elsewhere showed that 
ranberries can be effectively and 



COVER PHOTO 
,LDEN J. STANG, professor 
f horticulture, University of 
/isconsin/Madison, took this 
hoto of Typar spunbonded 
ibric covers applied over Sear- 
les cranberries at R.S. Brazeau 
Iranberries, Inc., Wisconsin 
^pids, Wise. A story on the 
overs starts on this page. 



CRANBERRY 

GROWERS 

REALTY 

Listings of buyers and 

sellers welcomed on 

cranberry acreage 

and upland. 

Appraisals 

DOUGLAS R. BEATON 

E. Sandwich, Mass 

02537 

(617)888-1288 



safely protected from frost or 
overwintered with organic mulches, 
i.e., straw, marsh hay, leaves, etc. 
Overlaid with clear plastic to keep 
the mulch dry, cranberries are 
readily overwintered, largely 
through retention of soil heat and 
prevention of dessication. 

Conventional solid bed produc- 
tion practices for cranberries, how- 
ever, do not lend themselves to the 
use of organic mulches for winter 
or frost protection — nor would suf- 
ficient mulch be available. Mulch 
application and removal also would 
create a nearly insurmountable 
deterrent to their use under exist- 
ing production practices. 

IS THERE an alternative? The 
development of lightweight spun- 
bonded polypropylene and poly- 
styrene covering sheets in the past 
decade has quickly changed plant 
nursery practices. 

Cold tender ornamentals and 
conifers are now commonly pro- 
tected from cold with spunbonded 
fabric covers. Spunbonded row 
covers are also rapidly being 



adapted for vegetable and small 
fruit (strawberry, raspberry) 
production. 

Spunbonded fabrics are not knit- 
ted or woven plastics but rather are 
extruded as tiny, continuous fila- 
ments. After cooling, these filaments 
are laid down on a moving belt and 
bonded into a cloth-like sheet, using 
a combination of heat, pressure 
and chemicals. Wherever the fibers 
cross, they are bonded together, 
limiting the imraveling and stretch- 
ing found with woven fabrics. 

Like other fabrics, spunbonded 
sheets permit the passage of light, 
water and air. For plant growers, 
this permits plants to breathe and 
allows irrigation without removal 
of the cloth. 

Early on, research with 
lightweight, spunbonded row cov- 
ers on tobacco, turf and vegetables 
showed that the covers provided 4° 
to 7°+ frost protection, that humid- 
ity was increased, moisture was 
conserved and earlier plant growth 
and maturity resulted. 

A primary benefit noted is a 



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CRANBERRIES April 1989 Page 3 



reduction in plant dehydration 
under the covers. In strawberries, 
spunbonded row covers have shown 
promise for providing overwinter- 
ing protection in place of the organic 
mulches normally used. 

INTRIGUED by these results, 
we set out a test plot in cranberries 



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CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

SEND CORRESPONDENCE TO: 

P.O. BOX 249 

COBALT CT 06414 

(203) 342-4730 

PUBLISHER a EDITOR: BOB TAYLOR 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: CAROLYN GILMORE 
(508) 763-5206 

ADVISORS & CORRESPONDENTS 

MASSACHUSETTS — Irving E Demoranville, 
Director, Cranberry Experiment Station. 

NEW JERSEY — Phillip E. Marucci. Crant)erry& Blueberry 
Specialist, Buddtown; Elizabeth G. Carpenter, Chatsworth 

NOVA SCOTIA — Robert A Murray. Horticulturist, Berry 
Crops. Research Station, Truro. 

OREGON — Arthur Poole. Coos County Extension Agent, 
Coquille. 

WASHINGTON — Azmi Y Shawa. Horticulturist and 
Extension Agent in Horticulture, Coastal Washington 
Research & Extension Unit, Long Beach. 

WISCONSIN — Tod, D Planer. Farm Management Agent. 
Wood County 

CRANBERRIES It publittwd monthly by Olyereifiwl Periodi- 
cals. W.llvryn Drive, Portland CT OMBO. Second clut pot- 
lag* It paid at th« Portland, Conn. Pott Ottlca. PrIca It t1 5 a 
year, $28 lor two yaart, $2 a copy In tha U.S.: $17 a year In 
Canada; $20 a yaar In all ottiar countrlaa. Back coplai: $2.50, 
Including pottaga. Copyright 1»8a by OlvartHlad Parlodlcalt. 

ISSN: 0011-0787 

Pottmattar, tend Form 3749 lo: 

CRANBERRIES 

P.O. BOX 249 

COBALT CT 06414 

Page 4 CRANBERRIES April 1989 



this season, using Typar spunbond- 
ed polypropylene. 

Typar is a heavy duty form of the 
fabric which resists punctures and 
tearing, with ultraviolet stabiliz- 
ers added for resistance to degra- 
dation by sunlight. Weight of the 
sheet is 1.9 oz/sq. yard. Sunlight 
resistance, hopefully, would allow 
for reuse of the fabric for two or 
more seasons. 

Both Reemay, a lighter duty 
spunbonded polyester, and Typar 
are manufactured by the Reemay 
Co., P.O. Box 511, Old Hickory, TN 
37138. 

A SINGLE plot totaling 22,800 
sq. feet was covered, using four 
sheets of Typar, at R.S. Brazeau 
Cranberries Inc., west of Wiscon- 
sin Rapids, Wise, on Dec. 5, 1988. 

At intervals throughout this 



spring, we plan to measure plant 
canopy temperatures and humid- 
ity under the mulch. Following ice- 
out in spring, individual covers 
will be removed at intervals to 
determine effects on early growth. 
Blossom and fruit counts will be 
made in the summer to determine if 
plastic row covers can indeed pro- 
vide adequate frost protection. 

ARE spunbonded fabrics also a 
possibility for winter protection of 
cranberries? 

Unfortunately, an unflooded 
cranberry bed was not available to 
test for winter protection with Typar. 
It is our plan to test these materials 
on an unflooded bed in 1989 if our 
preliminary frost protection tests 
with the material do show promis- 
ing results. 



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Another growing season 
is underway as the winter 
flood waters come off. With 
the growing season, there 
are growing season 
problems: frost, pollination 
and insects . . . 



Know the Insects 

The major cranberry insects: cranberry girdler, the fireworms, 
tip worm, blossom worm, cranberry fruitworm and Sparganothis 
fruitworm. 

Know the Insects 

The periodic cranberry insects: cranberry scale, fire beetle, 
blossom weevil, armyworm and bluntnose leafhopper. 

Know the Insects 

Color photographs of all these insects and more are now 
arranged with text in a portfolio that is available. 

The portfolio endeavors to bring together the words of research 
complementing the photographs and making a summary of 
cranberry insect information that will be of use to the cranberry 
grower for a lifetime. 

The portfolio is available for $100 and, if you wish to examine a 
copy, telephone (609) 894-8556 evenings around 6 p.m. or write to: 

Walter Z. Fort 

P.O. Box 183 

Pemberton, NJ 08068 




CRANBERRIES AprU 1989 Page 6 




val Association president. 



MASSACHUSETTS 

By IRVING E. DEMORANVILLE 

Dr. Rolsert Devlin of the Massachusetts 
Cranberry Experiment Station attended the 
Northeastern Weed Science Society meeting 
In Baltimore Jan. 3-6. He presented two pap- 
ers and was involved in committee activities. 

Dr. Irena Zbiec also attended the weed 
science meeting. 

Carolyn DeMoranville presented a paper 
on cranberry plant nutrition at the American 
Society for Horticultural Science, Northeast- 
ern Regional Section, meeting held in Mar- 
tlnsburg, W. Va., Jan. 5-7. 



"The Ocean Spray Success Story" was the 
title of a recent talk before the Bandon 
Chamber of Commerce given by Mary 
Schamehom. 



WASHINGTON 

A retirement party was held Feb. 17 for 
Azmi Y. Shawa, director, Coastal Washington 
Research & Extension Unit, Long Beach. Hor- 
ticulturist and County Extension Agent Shawa 
began his career with Washington State Uni- 
versity in 1956. The genial Shawa will occupy 
much of his time with management of his own 



5.5 acre cranberry bog. 



WISCONSIN 

Northland Cranberries Inc. of Wisconsin 
Rapids announces that its fourth quarter 
earnings for 1988 showed a 50 percent increase 
over those of 1987. 

For the quarter which ended Dec. 31 , 1 988, 
Northland reported net incomeof $1 ,372,302, 
or 57 cents a share, on sales of $5,326,695. 
That compared with a net income of $931 ,538, 
or 38 cents a share, on sales of $3,888,416 for 
the same period in 1987. 

Northland has nine marshes with a total 
acreage of 660 acres in central and northern 
Wisconsin. 



John C. Decat, major MauachuMtts inda- 
pandant grower and owner of DaCran Ag 
Suppllaa, attended the recant annual meeting 
of the National AgrlChamicai Ratailara Asao- 
ciation in Laa Vagaa. Formed in early 1988, 
NARA is an independent trade asaociatlon 
made up of 1,600 retail agricultural chemical 
daalan from acroaa the U.S. 



OREGON 

This year's Bandon Cranberry Festival will 
be held on Sept. 29 and 30. Susan Coates has 
agreed to serve again as the Cranberry FestI- 



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CRANBERRIES April 1989 Page 7 



EPA Bars 
Use of 
Captan 



Stating that the fungicide cap- 
tan posed a significant risk of 
cancer, the U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency recently barred 
use of the chemical ^fn 42 fruits and 
vegetables, including cranberries. 

The agency decided to permit its 
continued use on 24 other fruits 
and vegetables, however, including 
blueberries. 

Captan is one the country's most 
heavily used agricultural chemicals. 
According to the EPA, about 10 
million pounds of captan are app- 
lied to crops each year. The fungi- 
cide is processed by some 80 
companies. 

The EPA's stand was based on 
findings that captan use caused 
cancer in laboratory animals. 

Dr. John A. Moore, acting deputy 
administrator of the EPA, said the 
risk of humans getting cancer over 
a 70-year lifetime from eating any 
one of the 42 fruits and vegetables 
on which captan use is forbidden is 
less than one in a million. He added, 
however, that the aggregate risk 
from eating all of them was one in 



100,000. 

Besides cranberries, the list of 42 
includes avocadoes, beans, beets, 
broccoli, Brussels sprouts, bulb 
onions, cabbage, carrots, cantaloupes, 
cauliflower, celery planted in fields, 
collards, cotton, crabapples, 
cucumbers, eggplants, grapefruits, 
honey-dews, kale, leeks, lemons, 
limes, muskmelons, mustard greens, 
oranges, preharvest pears, peas, 
pineapples, potatoes, pumpkins, 
quince, rhubarb, rutabagas, shal- 
lots, soybeans, squash, sweet corn, 
tangelos and tangerines, tomatoes 



in fields, turnips and watermelons. 

EPA allowed the continued use 
of captan on blueberries and 23 
other fruits and vegetables because 
the residues of the chemical on 
those foods were low enough to 
keep the risk neglible. 

In other action in February, the 
EPA said that daminozide, used on 
apples to make the fruit ripen uni 
formly and to enhance its appear 
ance and shelf life, poses a signifi 
cant risk of cancer. However, th( 
agency will permit its use for a 
least 18 months. 



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Page 8 CRANBERRIES April 1989 



Ocean Spray Figures 

The Public'll Go 
Crazy Over Craisins 



The latest in a long line of Ocean 
Spray products— Craisins— is 
expected to be available on super- 
market shelves nationwide within 
i year. 

The sugar-infused, dried fruit will 
36 test-marketed in a still to be 
ietermined area in the late summer, 
laccording to John Moreton, div- 
ision manager, new products. 

Lloyd Wolfe, owner of Wolfe 
I!ranberry Co., Nekoosa, Wise, is 
imong those who believe the new 
)roduct is going to be met with an 
(nthusiastic public reception. 
I Wolfe was quoted by The Daily 



Tribune of Wisconsin Rapids as 
saying, "I think they're super." 

Mostly Wisconsin berries will be 
used once production gets under- 
way for the general public, accord- 
ing to Jerry Bach, receiving station 
manager at Ocean Spray's Bab- 
cock, Wise, plant. Most of the dry- 
ing of the fruit probably will take 
place in Michigan, adds Bach. 

In addition to being a tasty fruit 
snack that can be popped into the 
mouth, craisins also are intended 
for a wide variety of products, 
including baked goods, cereals and 
dairy foods. 



Rich O'Brian, national sales 
manager, ingredients, says the 
cooperative is producing "a quality 
fruit ingredient at a reasonable 
cost for major food companies." 

"Other fruit will not hold up as 
well to infusion and air drying," 
said O'Brian. "The cranberry has a 
strong cell structure needed for the 
process. 

"The bright, red berry color makes 
Craisins an ideal ingredient for 
(cereals, baked goods and dairy 
products). 

"Major companies in these cate- 
gories want a way to communicate 



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CRANBERRIES AprU 1989 Page 9 



clearly to consiimers that they have 
real fruit in the product. Now we 
can offer a contrast to the browns 
and beiges which most fruit and 
nuts provide." 

Ocean Spray's ingredient division 
has been aggressive in promoting 
this product even while the devel- 
opment work was continuing. 

"We wanted to get feedback from 
customers as to exactly what char- 
acteristics they wanted," said Dr. 
Tom Aurand, technical project 
leader, ingredients. 

"It's important to adjust the 
manufacturing technique for an 
ingredient to meet the specific 
requirements of your target 
customers." 

Initial response from customers 
has been "tremendous," reports 
Ocean Spray. 

Craisins have already been pres- 
ented in a major retail product— a 
Tyson gourmet dinner that uses 
the dried cranberries in a stuffing 
for one of their new chicken entrees. 

Future ideas for dried cranber- 



ries include natural fruits flavors, 
such as raspberry or strawberry, 
modifying sweetness and moisture 



content of the fruit and adjusting 
the size of individual pieces to meet 
the needs of various industries. 




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Ocean Spray Sponsors 
Great Strides 1 0K Walk 



Community involvement is a 
habit with Ocean Spray Cranber- 
ries Inc., which these days is spon- 
soring everything from a high school 
wrestling tournament in Bandon, 
Ore., to a nationwide lOK walk for 
the benefit of cystic fibrosis 
research. 

The wrestling tournament, the 
First Annual Cranberry Classic, 
took place in February and involved 
seven Oregon teams and one from 
^chorage, Alaska. Bandon bills 
tself as the Cranberry Capital of 
-Oregon. 

I The walk— the Great Strides lOK 
iValk — will take place on May 21 
md involve more than 40 cities in 
15 states and Washington, D.C. 

Besides guaranteeing the Cystic 
fibrosis Foundation a cash dona- 
ion of $200,000, Ocean Spray has 
aunched a $1 million promotional 
campaign in behalf of the event. 

Identification of the cystic fibro- 
;is gene and gene therapy are the 
nain thrusts of research in cystic 
ibrosis, the leading genetic killer 
)f children and young adults in the 
J.S. 

Some 30,000 children and young 
dults have cystic fibrosis, which 
iffects the lungs and pancreas. 



The 

CHARLES W.HARRIS 

Company 

451 Old Somerset Avenue 
North Dighton, Mass. 
Phone (508) 824-5607 

AMES 

Antisyphon Devices 

RAINBIRD 

Sprinklers 

HALE 

Pumps 

Hiihttf Qotlify Pto4aeis 
WlthSitisftetloii GutmtMd 



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DANNY BESSETTE, 4, is one of the 
children cystic fibrosis researchers 
hope to be able to help. 



interfering with breathing and 
digestion. 
As part of the promotional cam- 



paign, free standing inserts (Sun- 
day coupon supplements) and Ocean 
Spray product labels axe being used 



Vines For Sale 

Ben Lear $3,500 a ton 

Stevens $3,500 a ton 

Crowley $3,500 a ton 

Le Munyon $3,500 a ton 

Searlea $3,500 a ton 

$500 a ton less with 50% payment before cutting 

David Zawistowski 
6031 County Highway D (715) 479-4658 
Eagle River, Wl 54521 (715) 479-6546 



CRANBERRIES April 1989 Page 11 



to encourage people to participate 
in Great Strides. Ocean Spray will 
provide the cooperative's products 
at pre-event reillies and parties and 
along the walk route. 

"Ocean Spray is very excited at 
the prospect of working with the 
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation on Great 
Strides," said Kevin Murray, direc- 
tor of business operations, Ocean 
Spray. "Great Strides will provide 
us with an opportunity to increase 
our visibility as well as our sales. 

"But more than being a good 
business proposition. Great Strides 
makes everyone who works at Ocean 
Spray, from the President and CEO 
to the cranberry farmer who supp- 
lies us with our product, feel like 
they are doing something to help 
Einother person. 

"We are a family business, pro- 
viding a family product, and now 
we are doing something to help 
families in need. By sponsoring 
Great Strides, we give something 
back to the families who have sup- 
ported Ocean Spray by buying our 
products." 





OCEAN SPRAY announced its sponsorship of 
the Great Strides lOK Walk at a recent meeting 
of the National Food Brokers Association in 
San Francisco. L. to r.: Barry Gump, trustee-at- 
large, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF); Janice 
Collins, CFF director of corporate marketing; 
Barbara Balik, executive vice chairman, CFF 
national board of trustees; Tom Bullock, vice 
president of business operations. Ocean Spray. 




« 



Ag S 






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Inc. 




* Complete line of cranberry herbicides, fertilizers, insecticides, fungicides, 
miticides. In stock when you want them. 

* Best application and safety equipment for your needs. 

* Quality aerial applications. 

* Proven frost warning equipment. Don't take chances — buy the best. 

* Experienced cranberry consulting service offering pheromone traps and 
baits. 

* Right to know training. 

* Culvert Pipe — All sizes — steel, aluminum, and poly. 

* Ditch Mud Mats — Strong — lightweight — durable. 

* Burlap Picking Bags — Best for your money. 

* Sanding by helicopter. 



John C. Decas 

William D. Chamberlain 

461 Mary's Pond Rd. 
Rochester, MA 02770 

Office: 295-2731 
Evening: 763-8956 
Fax:(508)291-1417 



Serving Massachusetts Cranberry Growers 



Page 12 CRANBERRIES April 1989 



«.»»j. 4 r%^f\ 



I f\C 4 . _ 




Phut rot. 
No threat. 



^"f It's hard enough to bring in a good 
#.td cranberry crop without the threat of fruit 
rot diseases. 

That's why cranberry growers are turning to 
a better way to control fruit rot. Bravo 720. 

Bravo deHvers consistent, first-rate control 
of all the major fruit rot diseases that threaten 
cranberries. Plus leaf and twig blight 
(Lophodermium), too. 

And that's backed by results of eight years 
of testing which show that Bravo 720 is more 
effective on fruit rot diseases than all other 
fungicides. 

What's more, Bravo won't adversely affect 
fruit color. Or leave any lingering odor after 
application. 

And remember, you can apply Bravo with con- 
ventional spray equipment or through sprinkler 
irrigation. The advanced flowable formulation 
of Bravo 720 is easy to handle, easy to mix. 

So, this season, use Bravo 720 to protect your 
cranberry crop from fruit rot diseases. Just make 
your first spray at early bloom and stick to a 
regular 10- to 14-day schedule. 

End the threat of these fruit rot diseases and 
bring in a bigger yield come harvest. 

Bravo. Because you give it all you've got. 

Fermenta Plant Protection Company, 
5966 Heisley Road, P.O. Box 8000, 
Mentor, OH 44061-8000. 



Bravd720. 



"•934 were the 
fall. We have 
the normal 
>n and there 
dry or nearly 
, no winterkill 

y- 

I.E.D. 



;c- 



•ol 



w 



IS 




Always loHow label directions 
carefully when using agricultural 



'age 13 



to encourage people to participate 
in Great 
provide t 
at pre-evi 
along th< 
"Oceai 
the pros] 
Cystic R 
Strides," 
tor of bu 
Spray. "' 
us with £ 
our visib 
"But 1 
business 
makes ev 
Spray, fr 
to the cri 
lies us V 
they are 

another 
"We a 

viding a 

we are ( 

families 

Great St 

back to t 

ported 

products 



I 



I 



* Exp> 
baiU 

*Rig} 

* Cull 

* Ditc 
■k Burl 

* Saru 



Page 12 



^ecUke^ 



MASSACHUSETTS 

January was considerably warmer than 
normal, averaging 3.8 degrees a day above 
average. Maximum temperature was 53 
degrees on the 24th and the minimum was 5 
degrees on the 4th. Generally the first week of 
the month was cold and the rest was very 



warm. It was the warmest January since 1 975 
but only the ninth warmest in our records. 

Precipitation totaled 1.78 inches, or about 
2'/2 inches below normal. This was the sixth 
lowest January total in our records. There 
was measurable precipitation on seven days, 
with 0.55 on the 15th as the greatest 24-hour 
amount. There was no snow recorded for 
only the fourth time since we have been keep- 



ing records. 1969, 1951 and 1934 were the 
other Januaries without snovtrfall. We have 
received only 37 percent of the normal 
December-January precipitation and there 
are many unflooded bogs and dry or nearly 
dry reservoi rs and ponds. So far, no winterkill 
conditions— we have been lucky. 

I.E.D. 



^^NNBE/^/^^ 




COMPUTER, INC. 
CRANWARE 

• Growers 

• Handlers 

• Chemical Applications 

• Chemical Resale 

(508) 291-1192 

2 Tobey f^ood. Worehom, AAA 02571 



Equipment Inc. 



14 

I^UBO^fl Diesel 



381 West Grove Street (Rte. 28) 
Middleboro, MA 02346 



Tractors 2 & 4 wheel drive — 12-90 hp. 

Compact Excavators 1 '/^ to 6 ton 

Wheel Leaders V? to % yd. 

Water Cooled Diesel Engines 4 to 104 hp. 

AW Types of Implements 
Polymark Beaver-Mowers 
Specialty Fabrication Work 
Kubota Financing as Low as 8'/?% 

*Sales ^Service *Parts ^Leasing 

*.<« "O^ on 0*5« mO^ -fcO^ 



947-6299 



Devrmol. 

iTheGende 
Hertttcidefor 
Cranberries. 



With gentle protection, DEVRINOL® 
10- G herbicide provides broad-spec- 
trum weed control of over 40 broadleaf 
weeds and grasses, including nutsedge. 
DEVRINOL gives you long-lasting control 
throughout the seasoa And it's easy to 
apply-on the ground or in the air 

For more information, see your dealer 
or call the ICI Information Line: 
1-800-759-2500. 

Always read and follow label directions 
carefully 



DJ^W^DM© 



,1 



.eled nutsedge control in Massachusetts and New Jersey only See label for specific recommendations,) 




CRANBERRIES April 1980 Page 13 




FERMENTA PROVIDES 
FOUR INTERNSHIPS 

Four university students completed intern- 
ships with the Fermenta Plant Protection 
Company of Mentor, Ohio, last summer. 

The students, John Nygaard of Scandi- 
navia, Wise, Steven Kammerer of Xenia, 
Ohio, Christopher Davis of Attica, Ind., and 
Taron Thorpe of Newville, Ala., spent three 
to four months learning about diseases that 
damage food crops and the protective bene- 
fits of fungicides. 



Over the 4 Million Hurdle 

Wow! A 4 million barrel cranberry crop. Hats should go off to 
everybody in the field, from grower to agricultural scientist to 
marketer. This is an astounding achievement regarding a 
berry that's small in size but prominent on the shopping lists of 
the American consumer. 

Keep the ideas Coming 

Heavily responsible for the 4 million barrel crop, of course, 
are the people in the white coats who develop and test new 
product ideas in the lab. Their latest wonder is the craisin, 
which, if early predictions come true, will make a big hit on 
supermarket shelves. 

A Good Citizen 

Civic involvement can make good cents. It also bespeaks a 
sense of civic responsibility that goes beyond the bottom line. 
Ocean Spray is demonstrating such civic responsibility with 
its heavy involvement in the fight to find a cure for cystic 
fibrosis. Scientists are on the threshold of identifying the gene 
that causes the dreaded disease. Ocean Spray's effort could 
prove to be the push that gets them over the top. 

Capstan Issue a Sign 

The EPA's banning of Capstan is a likely signal of things to 
come. That doesn't mean a blanket restriction on chemicals. 
But it does mean judicious use, greater attention to alterna- 
tives, and increased education. Not only will there be a greater 
demand for knowledge on the part of the grower. But the 
general public will have much to learn about the appropriate 
use of chemicals. 




Pump Repairs 
SL Sales 

All Types 

• Field Service 

• Chemlgation Equipment 
Sold 

• Demonstration by 
Appointment 

AAA Industrial 
Pump Service Inc. 

Bruce Sunnerberg 

Q6 Lake Street 

Plympton, MA 02367 

(617)585-2394 




O^^M 



Equipment, inc. 



381 West Grove St. (Rte. 28) 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

(508) 947-6299 

PKUBOTR 

Tractors, Excavators and 
Diesel Generators 



lYOTE 




Wheel Loaders 
3/4 Yd -6 1/2 Yd 

Screening Equipment 



Page 14 CRANBERRIES April 1989 



LAB MADE FUNGUS KILLS WEEDS 

Another sign of the rapid development of 
agricultural biotechnology was the 
announcement recently of a new fungus 
with natural weed-killing properties. 

The fungus, known to scientists as Alter- 
naria cassiae, does not harm crop plants. It 
will be marketed in 1990, under the trade 
name Vasst bioherbicide, by Mycogen Corp., 
San Diego, said James S. Bannon, director 
of Mycogen's research station in Ruston, 
La. 

Bannon made the announcement at a bio- 
logical pest control conference in Washing- 
ton, D.C. 

Casst will be used against coffee senna 
and sicklepod weeds in peanut and soybean 
crops. 



POLLINATION 

Are you getting the most for 
your pollination dollar? Be sure 
the hives you rent give you maxi- 
mum return. We can help. (We are 
not pollinators: we do not rent 
hives.) Brochure available. 
Aplcultural Associates, RR 1 Box 
225, Charlemont, MA 01 339, (41 3) 
339-5320, (413) 625-9630. 




Cranberry Harvesting Equipment 

Warrens Equipment & Manufacturing Co., Inc. 




Growing cranberries is 
something you as a grower do 
best. Manufacturing of 
harvesting equipment, air 
flow, radar controlled fertilizer 
spreading equipment, and 
flow gates or flumes is 
something we do that can be 
of service to you. 



NEWS FLASHES 

New All Aluminum Bog-Tractor & Beater for 1989 with Features such as: 

• All hydrostatic 4-whe«l drive • Safety parking brake 

• Fenders • Ground speed and reel speed Indicator 

• On-the-go reel speed change • Lighter weight 

• Engine horsepower available from 18 h.p. to 48 h.p. 
Be sure to check this new model harvester before you make a purchase for 1989. 



I 



I 



WEM Factory serving Wisconsin, West Coast, British Columbia 

111 Grant St. 
Warrens. Wi 54666 
Tel. (608) 378-4794 
(608) 378-4137 



WEM East Coast 

Steams Irrigation, Inc. 

790 Federal Furnace Rd. 

Plymouth, MA 02360 

Tel. (508) 746-6048 



CRANBERRIES April 1989 Page 15 




For pure elegance in the most perfect 
taste, nothing is more appropriate than 
planning a menu which is based on 
classic recipes. A knowledgeable hostess 
who wishes to present her guests with a 
superb dining experience will give much 
thought to her menu. And when her 
expectations of success are fulfilled, 
she wiU use the same menu again for 
many another occasion. The basic 
entree — around which she can vary 
complementary courses — is of the 
utmost importance. 

Cranberry Beef Wellington is such a 
magnificent entree. A recipe with grand 
tradition, it has been sensitively revised 



and changed here to make its prepara- 
tion easier and quicker, without losing 
its rare quality. 

A subtle mix of sauteed onions, liver 
pate (or liverwurst) and cranberry- 
orange relish is layered over the beef, 
which is then encased in a blemket of 
pie crust. The pate-berry mixture can 
be made ahead of time and the use of a 
prepared pie crust mix is also a great 
time saver. A last touch is to create 
your own designs from the pastry dough 
to decoratively enhance the top of the 
beef. Use your imagination and, either 
by hand or with decorative cutouts, 
make a design of flowers, leaves and 
stems. 

It is quite traditional to serve Beef 
Wellington either warm from the oven 
or at room temperature. For a buffet or 
even lunch the next day, it would be a 
rare treat. 

For an enchanting dessert, pretty 
and light Cold Cranberry Souffle is a 
perfect choice for this dinner. It has a 
fluffy texture and uniquely piquant 
flavor combining concentrated lemo- 
nade, whole berry cranberry sauce, egg 
whites and spiced apples. To tastefully 
anoint each souffle serving. Cranberry 
Wine Sauce tangily mixes whole berry 



cranberry sauce, port wine and grated 
orange and lemon. Both the dessert 
and sauce can be made well in advance 
of the event. 

To your menu, you might add a plat- 
ter centered with cauliflower siurrounded 
by tiny carrots and peas, as well as a 
salad of crisp greens tossed with a light 
dressing. And don't forget a wine; either 
a full-bodied red, sparkling burgundy 



O Gapen 

Realty & Insurance 



Knowledge & ability to 

unite buyers and sellers 

for existing marshes or 

undeveloped land. 

2141 8th street South 

Wisconsin Rapids, 

Wisconsin 54494 

(715)423-6550 

m Sis ■ ^ 

REALTOR tVWm^^ WraiTUMTV 



I 



K Ag Laboratories International, Inc. 

2323 Jackson Street 
Oshkosh, Wl 54901 

* Cranberry Soil Analysis 

* Cranberry Vine Analysis 

* Cranberry Water Analysis, 
Usage & Interpretation 

* Liquid & Dry Fertilizer 
Recommendation 

* Soil Problem,s & Consultation 

* Seminars 

* Cranberry Crop Monitoring 
Program, testing and 
monitoring nutrient status 
with 30 day intervals during 
during the growing season. 



Serving Cranberry 
Growers in U.S.A. 
& Canada since 1984 

Over 20 years 
of Experience on 
Acid Soil Interaction 



K Ag Laboratory has 
run over 30,000 



cranberry soil and over 
17,500 cranberry vines 
tests since 1984, and 
gave fertilizer 
recommendations with 
great success. 



Highly computerized cranberry soil, tissue and water testing program in 
U.S.A. and Canada. 

For more information contact: Dr. Akhtar Khwaja, Ph.D. 

Certified Professional Soil Scientist 
Certified Professional Agronomist 

Phone Number 4 14-426-2220; OulofWII -300-356-6045; FAX 4 14-426-2222 



SiIt 



.vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvgss 



Page 16 CRANBERRIES April 1989 




^,^^^^^ ^^u^^^^lf. *^*S ^**'* of Cranberry Beef WelUngton and Cold Cranberry Souffle to be 

!J1 r* uP''*"^^'''^ ^^J' ^""*^- A c**"™***** *»*»!« centerpiece is composed^SoatSi freXor 
>zen-freBh) cranberries, flowers and leaves. iiwaung iresn (or 

CRANBERRIES April 1989 Page 17 



or champagne would be correct. 

For your table centerpiece, consider 
this charming idea: In a bowl, filled 
with water, float fresh or fi-ozen-fresh 
cranberries and a few flowers of the 
season, then surround the sides with 
green leaves (lemon, galax or some 
from your very own tree). This simple 
arrangement will be as exciting as any 
conceived by a professional florist. 

Now to the recipes for your classic 
feast. 

Cranberry 

Beef 

Wellington 

(Serves 8) 

1 fillet of beef, 3 to 4 pounds, 
all fat removed 

1 clove garlic, crushed 
Salt and pepper 

2 tablespoons butter or margarine 
1 onion, minced 

Ml cup cranberry -orange relish 

1 can (4 ounces) liver pate or 
liverwurst spread 

2 packages (11 ounces each) pie 
crust mix 

1 egg, well beaten 

Spread fillet of beef with garlic and sprinkle 
with salt and pepper. Fold thin end under to 
make fillet roast more evenly. Place in a 
shallow roasting pan. Roast in preheated 
hot oven (400^) for 20 minutes. Remove 
from oven and cool thoroughly. In a skillet, 
heat butter and saute onion and cranberry- 
orange relish for 5 minutes, stirring con- 
stantly. Stir in pate until well blended. 
Remove from heat and chill. Prepare pie 
crust mix according to package directions. 
Roll out % of the pie crust on a floured sur- 
face into an oblong large enough to enclose 
the entire fillet. Spread the center of the pie 
crust evenly with the pate mixture. Place 
the fillet, top side down, onto the pate mix- 
ture. Fold crust over fillet, brushing edges of 
crust with water to seal. Turn in ends and 
seal. Place fillet, seam side down, onto a 
large, greased cookie sheet. Roll out remain- 
ing pie crust and cut into flowers, leaves and 
stems. Brush fillet with beaten egg. Arrange 
decorations on top of fillet. Brush decora- 
tions with beaten egg. Bake in a preheated 
hot oven (400°F) for 20 to 25 minutes or until 
crust is richly browned. Cut into thick slices 
and serve at once. 

Cold 

Cranberry 

Souffle 

(Serves 8) 

3 envelopes unflavored gelatin 
1 can (6 ounces) frozen, concentrated 
lemonade, thawed and undiluted 

1 cup water 

2 cans (1 pound each) whole berry 

Page 18 CRANBERRIES April 1080 



cranberry sauce 
1 jar (14 ounces) spiced apple rings 
4 egg whites, at room temperature, 

stiffly beaten 

In a large saucepan, mix gelatin, lemonade 
and water. Stir over low heat until gelatin is 
dissolved. Stir in cranberry sauce and juice 
drained from apple rings. Chop apple rings 
and stir into cranberry mixture. Chill until 
slightly thickened. Gently and completely 
fold in egg whites. Make a foil collar 3 
inches high, fasten securely with tape or 
string around the outer edge of a quart souf- 
fle dish. Slowly pour in cranberry mixture. 
Chill until firm. Remove foil and serve with 
Cranberry Wine Sauce. 



Cranberry 
Wine Sauce 

(Serves 8) 

1 can (1 pound) whole berry cranberry 
sauce 

2 cups port wine 

2 tablespoons cornstarch 
y* cup water 

1 teaspoon each grated orange and 
lemon rind 

In a large saucepan, combine sauce and port 
wine. Bring mixture to a boil. Reduce heat to 
low. Mix cornstarch with water until smooth 
and stir into simmering sauce. Stir over low 



heat constantiy until sauce bubbles and 
thickens. Stir in rinds. Cool and then chill 
imtil ready to serve. Makes about 2 cups 
sauce. 



KUBOTA NAMES HILL 

Robert J. Hill recently was named direc- 
tor of marketing for the Kubota Tractor 
Corporation of Compton, Calif. 



\ 
I 
I 
I 
I 

i 
i 



Bogs For Lease 

TAUNTON 

4 BOGS — 22 Acres 

• DORMANT BOGS 
•CHAPTER 61A 
•READY TO REBUILD 
•COMPLETE PLANS 

• LONG TERM LEASE 

Stephen Horbach 

25 Mariner Ct. 

Brewster, MA 02631 



1 



!feg^^:s:s^ 



I 
I 

r 

I 

I 



j^imm3miimimimimimmi>mmi»n 



It 



"Vlne^ 3c^ SPa^e/ 



Early Blacks 

Stevens 

Howes 



Crowley 



$2,500 a ton 
$4,000 a ton 
$2,500 a ton 
$3,500 a ton 



I 

I 

I 



Prices F.O.B. 



R.M. Lawton Cranberries, Inc. 

221 Thomas St. 

Middleboro, MA 02346 

(508) 947-7465 



^m^m:imimimim^m^fmmim:im:im:im 



BAKER TRACTOR HOLDS 
GALA GRAND OPENING 

TTie Baker Tractor Corporation held grand 
opening celebrations on March 17 and 18 in 
connection with its move to its new show- 
room and headquarters on GAR Highway 
(Route 6) in Swansea, Mass. 

More than 3,000 invitations were mailed 
out for the event, which took place at the 
Seekonk Ramada Inn. 



CRANLAND 
SERVICES 

Cranberry Property 

Appraisals 

**•*•• 

Listings and Sales of 

Cranberry Properties. 

License # 68987 



^ 



Lawrence W. Pink 

Old Gordwood Path 

Duxbury, MA 02332 

(617)934-6076 










Spring 1989 



Ben Lear 
Crowley 
Stevens 
Pilgrims 

Buy 10 tons, get one ton free. 
20% down payment with order. 
Call for large order pricing. 



Y»\ v«v ■/»' vtv v«v Yii\- Y«Y y»^■ Y«Y Y«Y Y«Y. Y«\: yti\ 



,!^^SS^ 



CRANBERRIES, INC. 



Vines For Saie 



$3,500.00 per ton 
$3,500.00 per ton 
$3,500.00 per ton 
$4,000.00 per ton 



Prices F.O.B. 



Contact: 
LeRoy Miles 

Northland Cranberries, Inc. 
(715) 424-4444 
251 Oak Street 
Wisconsin Rapids, Wl 54494 



BWWWnBA^^Jg' 



L 



CRANBERRIES AprU 1989 Page 19 




3 



VOLM BAG COMPANY 



1804 EDISON ST. BOX B, ANTIGO, WIS. 54409-0116 
PHONE 715/627-4826 

SUPPLYING AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS 

BRAVO - SEVIN - FUNGINEX - ORTHENE 
CASORON - GUTHION - DEVRINOL - PARATHION 

AND 

DELIVERING A COMPLETE LINE OF FERTILIZER 
WITH FAST FRIENDLY SERVICE!!! 




CONSULTING ENGINEERS 
SURVEYORS 



Extensive experience in all aspects of cranberry 
land development: evaluation, purchase, survey, 
design, permit acquisition, phased construction and 
planting both in wetlands and uplands. 

Have references. Will travel. 

Contact: \N\\\ Lee 

10948 Highway 54 East 
Wisconsin Rapids, Wl 54494 

(715)424-3131 



Financial Strength. . . 

Personalized Service. 

Isn't That What You Need In A Bank? 



The Jackson County Bank 
has supported agriculture in the 
area for more than 1 1 years. 

We recognize the importance 
of the cranberry industry and are 
pleased to provide financial ser- 
vices for all your banking needs. 



We're large enough to serve 
you and yet we offer personal- 
ized service which your busi- 
ness demands. Call us at 715- 
284-5341 

The Jackson County Bank. A 
name to count on throughout 
the years. 



JACKSON 
COUNTY 




Mtmbet FDIC 
(715)2WS3<1 



YANKEE 
PLANNERS, 
INC. 

59 North Main Street 

Middleboro, MA 02346 

(508) 947-0527 



Sound and Objective 

Advice 

Suited to 

Your Needs 



• Tax and Estate Planning 

• Investment & Insurance 

Review 

• Business Continuity 

• Asset Protection 

• Key Employee Retention 

• Business Tax Analysis 



Mr. William H. Bestgen, Jr. 

Chartered Financial Consultant 



Mr. Peter W. Hutchings 

Attorney at Law practicing as 
a Tax Attorney 



Mr. Roger H. Parent, Jr. 

Accountant, Enrolled to Practice 

before the Internal Revenue 

Service 



Call For Your Free Brochure 

(508) 947-0527 



I 



Page 20 CRANBERRIES April 1989 



HOECHST CONSOLIDATES 

Hoechst Celanese Corporation and Hoechst 
Canada Inc. recently announced consolida- 
tion of their crop protection and animal 
health products. 



VINES FOR SALE 



Howes and 
Early Blacks 



CALL 



(508) 428-6101 

Or 

(508) 428-0907 

After 6 p.m. 



No matter how small 
your business, you can 
afford to place an ad in the 
magazine that serves the 
industry: CRANBERRIES! 











K 




Krause Excavating, inc. 

canal Work Ditching 
Pond Construction Land Clearing 

1-1/4-3 yd. draglines with 80' boom and matts, 2 yd. 
bacl<hoe, swamp dozer and other related equipment. 

Contact: 

Roger Krause 1-414-398-3322 
Route 3 Markesan. Wis. 53946 



MTC 



MIDDLEBOROUGH 
TRUST COMPANY 



gas 



The Business Bank. 

MTC offers you business banking built to your needs. 

Personal attention to your specicd 

financial requirements now and as you grow. Cooperatioa 

Flexibility. Complete business and personal banking. 

Member FDIC 




(=J 



LENDER 



27 



Main Office 

10 John Glass, Jr. Square, Middleborough 

Branch Offices 

Middleboro Square, Rt. 28, Middleborough • Middleboro Plaza, Middleborough 
Cranberry Plaza, East Wareham • Carver Square, Carver • Trucchi's Plaza, Taunton 

Telephone all offices 947-1313 



CRANBERRIES April 1989 Page 21 



Thoy Help to Spell Success 




By JOSEPH ARKIN 

Business letters play so important 
a role in projecting your firm's 
image. 

Consultants in the field of busi- 
ness letter writing claim that cliches 
are the culprits responsible for so 
many of today's poorly written let- 
ters. There can be no better illus- 
tration than the secretary of a fun- 
eral parlor who closed letters to the 
famiUes of the bereaved with, "We 
hope to serve you again in the 
future — and often. ' ' In other words , 
"Many happy funerals to you!" 

The trouble here was that a new 
and eager office worker resorted to 
standard terminology so often used 
in business letter writing. But doing 
so can be pretty silly at times, even 
downright insulting. 

ONE of the greatest dangers of old- 
fashioned, hackneyed phrases is that 
we use them carelessly, without think- 
ing. Unfortunately, not one person in 
ten who writes business letters — 
including college graduates — has had 
adequate training in the technique and 
psychology of writing them. It's more 
than a matter of ability to express 
ideas. The clearest, most lucid letter 
ever written may leave a reader indif- 
ferent, sometimes furious. 

Most business correspondents simply 
mimic the style of the person who pre- 
ceded them. And their predecessors 
mimicked those before them. 

Is it any wonder that so many busi- 
ness letters sound like something dug 
out of an attic trunk? Some are so 
stuffy, formal and frigid that they might 
have been written by a robot. 

A positive step in producing more 
efficient business letters is to go through 
your correspondence files and review 
carbon copies (or xerocopies, as is more 
often the case today) of letters recently 
mailed. Imperfections and downright 
silly expressions will stand out. You'll 
see ways to improve your future letters 
and avoid glaring mistakes. 

Here are some tips on how to make 

Page 22 CRANBERRIES April 1989 



M444te^^ 




your business letters more effective: 

Make Your Letters Simple 

• Give extra care to wording the opening 
sentence. Your subject should start on the 
right track; use it as your guide. 

• Pretend you're facing the recipient and 
don't use any long words or fancy phrases 
you wouldn't employ in face-to-face conver- 
sation. Can you imagine your saying to him 



or her, "I wish to call your attention ..." or 
"Please be advised that . . . ?" If you 
wouldn't talk that way, don't write that 
way. Avoid the stereotyped phrases. Listed 
below are some of the more common ones. In 
brackets are some of the thoughts they 
might evoke in the recipient. 



Hereafter and henceforth . 
tious can you get?) 



, . (How repeti- 



WISCONSIN CRANBERRY 
HEADQUARTERS FOR 

XCOLC 

SEVINXLR 

DEVRINOL 10G • EVITAL ♦ GUTHION 
DIAZINON 14G ♦ PARATHION * ETHREL 

Cole /Grower Service 

537 Atlas Ave., P.O. Box 721 1 , Madison, Wl 53707 
(608) 221-6204 or 1-800-362-8049 



Tit r/i,^^i tv^ ^wi iV/T^.'- r.' 



J. A . JENKINS &SON CO.\ 

Grower Service 



MOWING (ALL TYPES) 
SANDING 



DITCHING 
WEED WIPING 



Serving Cape Cod 

227 Pine St., W. Barnstable, Ma. 02668 

Phone 362-6018 



fMI^VS^ifSMJIiXfSfifBiSt^^ 



Kindly command me . . . (Are you kidding?) 
In due course of time . . . (After the usual 
jbuck passing.) 
I wish to state . . . (Why wish? Just say it!) 
Permit me to say . . . (Go away you stuffed 
shirt.) 
As you know . . . (If not, I'm stupid, eh?) 
" We note your request for . . . (Condescend- 
ing of you.) 

Due to the fact that . . . (You mean 
because?) 

• Know your subject so well that you can 
discuss it naturally and confidently 
hroughout your letter. 

• Use short sentences, short paragraphs. 
3e compact. And don't separate closely 
elated parts of sentence. 

• Tie your thoughts together so your reader 
an follow you from one to another without 



Wanted 

Wisconsin Cranbeny 
Grower wishes to purchase 
an existing cranberry marsh. 

STEVE 

(715)421-0917 
(715) 593-2385 



getting lost. This is especially important 
when you are explaining a recent price 
increase. 

Make Your Letters Short 

• Don't repeat phrases from the letter you 



are answering. The sender knows what was 
said. 

• Avoid needless words and information. 
Don't volunteer information not relative to 
the subject at hand. 



Vines For Sale 

Ben Lear $5,000 a ton 

Stevens $4,000 a ton 

Crowley $4,000 a ton 

Bergman $4,000 a ton 

Prices are F.O.B. 
$500 a ton less with 50% payment before cutting 



Richberry Farms Ltd. 



11280 Mellis Drive 
Richmond, B.C. 
V6X 1L7 Canada 



Res. (604) 273-4505 
Bus. (604) 273-0777 



22 years experience 



constructi on lifts ^^^^ 




AERIAtltfFTING 



"BERRY LirWGo 

nylon berry bags 
^ bulk bins 

CRANBERRV 
GROWERS SpRVICE 



f 



rRlBHAM 

'3 



" MUd LIFTim ° 

HmMm 

lightweight 
durable 



'*"^>«wSMMf**^ mat renfals'& sales 



eentad 
PETER '^ CHUCK 

508-295-2222 



CRANBERRIES April 1989 Page 23 



Take Good 

Care of Yourself 

Have an Ocean Spray! 



"~''**S*^*i4««vflKas™(Sia*»^"" 




The farmer's cooperative that brings you 
a wide range of natural fruit juices, drinks and sauces 

Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc., Plymouth, Massachusetts 02360 
An Equal Opportunity Employer 




CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

'^ay 1989 Vol. 53, No. 5 



i 



COASTAL 

WASHINGTDN 

RBEARCH EXTENSION 
UNIT 



WASHINGTON SIWE UNIVBeilY 



0fM4^ 




•i863' 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
LIBRARY 




Washington Director Retires 
^' I. Research Unit Expands 
Calcium and S 



:;:.:00f0 yn 

Aywaen ssww -in ainh 





BARK RIVER 

Quality products and 
% trained, dedicated people 

I'lMt ^^^^^''^9 betiind them. 




It's a combination that adds up to top production for you! 

Then add BARK RIVER'S full line of other quality tools and equipment and you have 
a complete source for all your equipment needs, all backed with dependable product support. 



ll 



Crawler Loaders Draglines 


Hydraulic Excavators 


Rollers 


Trucks (off-highway) 


Crawler Tractors Drills 


Hydraulic Shovels 


Scrapers 


Wheel Loaders 


Graders 


Planers 


Shovels 




• FRINK SNOW-PLOWS 


• HITACHI EXCAVATORS 
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Page 2 CRANBERRIES May 1989 



Retires After 29 Years as CWREU Director 

Horticulturist Shawa 
Becomes Grower Shawa 



Like Voltaire's Candide, Azmi Y. 
Shawa has traveled many roads, 
tasted many climes, and now would 
like to settle down and tend his 
garden, or, more precisely, his bog. 

Director of the Coastal Washing- 
ton Research & Extension Unit in 
^ng Beach for 24 years, the like- 
ible Shawa retired from the post 
ecently. 

During his involvement with 

lorticulture over some four decades, 

Jhawa traveled between continents 

j ind across the country many times. 

ji^urther travel, the goal of many 

-etirees, will be put on the back 

urner for awhile. He and Mrs. 

•hawa are looking forward to some 

elaxation around their Long Beach 

ome and Mr. Shawa is eager to 

ultivate the 5y2 acre bog he bought 

2 years ago. 

And, besides, he wants to be 
vailable for consulting work and 
e'd like to keep his fingers in 
I Jsearch. 

Shawa first came to Long Beach 

3 a senior horticultural assistant 
u 1960. Five years later he was 
aosen to head the station. 

A native of Palestine, Shawa grew 
n in Gaza, where his parents owned 
( ange groves. His interest in agri- 
(ilture developed early. 



COVER PHOTO 

JZMI Y. SHAWA has retired as 
te director of the Coastal 
Ushinsrton Research Extension 
liit but he hasn't retired from 
canberrying, what with his 
o^Ti 5Mj acre bog, research, 
ensulting and a friendly chat 
ii»w and then with fellow 
lowers. 

(ElANBERRIES photo by Carol 
Shurter) 




SHOW SHAWA a bog and he can't resist inspecting the vines. 

(CRANBERRIES photo by Carol Schurter) 



He attended agricultural school 
in Gaza, first studying irrigation, 
then switching to horticulture. 

Utah State University was his 
next stop. He came there in 1949 
and received a bachelor's degree in 
horticulture two years later. He 
specialized in pomology. 

Next he studied at Colorado State 
University, where he received his 
master's in horticulture in 1953. 
Then it was on to Washington State 
University for his Ph.D. He inter- 
rupted his studies to accept a post 
as senior experimental aide at the 
Prosser, Wash., research and 
extension center. Family responsi- 
bilities were a factor in his decision. 



Two years later, the Libyan 
government invited him to do hor- 
ticultural research in that country. 
While there he introduced new var- 
ieties of fruit trees. 

In 1960heretximed to Long Beach 
and has been there since. And he 
doesn't intend to leave. 

"I love the country and the qual- 
ity of life here," he said. 

The highlight of his career, he 
believes, was his introduction of 
lots of new herbicides. 

"When I took over, the only two 
herbicides were Casoron and a lit- 
tle 214," he noted. "Now there's ar 
arm's long Ust of herbicides that 
can be used safely." 

CRANBERRIES May 1989 Page 3 



Shawa also is proud of the 
research he has done to improve 
the color and the keeping quality of 
crtinberries. 

The highly respected researcher 
said he hopes his successor — who 
is expected to be named in the next 
few months— will concentrate on 
fertility and crop hardiness. 

About the latter, he said: "We've 
got to find the ways and means of 
protecting cranberries from injury, 
especially winter kill. We don't know 
the factors yet, nutritional and 
otherwise. This is a science in itself. 
Someone has got to tackle it." 

The horticultural expert calls 
"unfortimate" the growing anxiety 
over pesticide residues. 

"If pesticides are used rationally, 
carefully, after thorough scientific 
studies, I don't see the danger to 
human life," he said. "All that's 
being achieved now is a kind of 
nagging of agriculture. Critics talk 
about organic gardening and think 
we can survive without pesticides. 
Organic gardening is fine but how 
do you get the production?" 

Shawa owned that some growers 
use pesticides unwisely but said 
that's an education and policing 
problem, not a basis for eradicating 
pesticides. 

The retired director carried on a 
tradition of longevity at Long Beach, 
the only research facility besides 
the Massachusetts Cranberry 
Experiment Station devoted exclu- 
sively to cranberries. There have 
been only three directors at Long 
Beach. 

D.J. Crowley, the first director, 
who served from 1923 through 1954, 
virtually revolutionized cranberry- 
ing with his development of the 
overhead sprinkler system. Charles 
Doughty headed the station from 
1954 through 1965. And then came 
Shawa. 

Among his other accomplish- 
ments, Shawa was the principal 
author of the booklet, "Cranberry 
Production in the Pacific 
Northwest." 

Growers, as well as others in the 
cranberry field, also appreciated 
Shawa's authorship of the concise, 
informative monthly newsletter. 
Cranberry Vine. The newsletter will 
be put on hold until a new director 

Page 4 CRANBERRIES May 1989 



is chosen. 

For Shawa now, much of his day 
will be spent tending his McFar- 
lins and a few Stevens. And there 
will be time to indulge his three 
grandchildren — another is on the 
way. Mr. and Mrs. Shawa have one 
son and two daughters. 

Will Shawa be missed? 

Well, a retirement reception was 
held at the Long Beach station and 



150 people showed up. 

Or take the words of David This- 
sell of Seaview, chairman of the 
local cranberry growers advisory 
board. 

Thissell told the Chinook 
Observer's Mark Kester, "He has 
been a help to the old and new 
grower alike. He will be a hard man 
to replace." 



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NFPA Predicts 
Juice Content 
Controversy Will 
Soon Be Resolved 

The National Food Procesors Asso- 
ciation (NFPA) is optimistic that juice 
labeUng requirements that satisfy all 
^ segments of the industry will become a 
reality. 

Ellen R. Morton, NFPA manager, 
media relations, said the NFPA special 
task force assigned to the study of juice 
labeling has taken a two pronged 
approach. One is to ask the Food & 
Drug Administration to require juice 
content labeling of all juice and dilute 
juice products. The second is to seek 
development of legislation to require 
full nutrition labeling on both types of 
products. 

The proposals represent a compro- 
nise among those processors who want 
uice content labeling and other pro- 
I lessors, such as Ocean Spray Cranber- 
■ies, who produce high acid drinks and 
vho argue that juice content labeling 
ilone, without considering nutritional 
/alue, is unfair. 
_, NFPA says the task force agreement 



6 



RANBERRIES 

E NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

SEND CORRESPONDENCE TO: 

P.O. BOX 249 

COBALT CT 06414 

(203)342-4730 

Fax #: (203) 342-1977 

PUBLISHER & EDITOR: BOB TAYLOR 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: CAROLYN GILMORE 
(508) 763-5206 

3VIS0RS & CORRESPONDENTS 

lASSACHUSETTS — Irving E Demoranville, 

JCtor. Cranberry Experiment Station. 

EW JERSEY — Phillip E, Marucci, Cranberry & Blueberry 

cialist, Buddtown: Elizabetfi G. Carpenter, Ctiatswortfi. 

OVA SCOTIA — Robert A- Murray, Horticulturist, Berry 

ps, Research Station, Truro. 

REGON — Arthur Poole. Coos County Extension Agent. 

luille. 

WASHINGTON — Azmi Y. Stiawa, Horticulturist and 

red Director. Coastal Washington Research & Extension 

t. Long Beach 

'ISCONSIN — Tod. D Planer. Farm Management Agent. 

3d County. 

^NBERRIES li publlth*d monthly by Olverellled Perlodl- 
Wdlwyn Driva, Portland CT 06480. Second clut poi- 
li paid at the Porlland, Conn. Put Oltlce. Prica la $15 a 
, $28 (or two yaara, $2 a copy In tha U.S.; $17 a year In 
ada; $20 a year In all other countrtaa. Back coplaa: $2.50, 
iding poataga. Copyright 1 988 by DIvaralllad Parkidlcala. 



ISSN: 0011-0787 

Poatmaater, aand Form 3749 lo: 

CRANBERRIES 

P.O. BOX 249 

COBALT CT 06414 



represents "an unprecedented consen- 
sus among members of NFPA that 
pack fruit and vegetable juices, dilute 
juice beverages and high acid juice 
products." NFPA represents over 600 
food processing companies and suppli- 
ers to the industry. 



Companies represented on the task 
force, besides Ocean Spray, include 
National Fruit Product Co., Tree Top, 
Clement Pappas & Co., Dole Packaged 
Foods, Campbell Soup, General Foods, 
Del Monte USA and George A. Hormel 
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Farm families count on him to provide the financial support they need— short- 
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Taunton, MA 02780 
508 / 824-7578 





CRANBERRIES May 1989 Page 5 



Biological Controls Top Concern 



N.J. Station Becomes National Base 
For Cranberry, Biueberry Researcii 



By ELIZABETH CARPENTER 

National research in cranberries 
and blueberries will be transferred 
from a Beltsville, Md., USDA facU- 
ity to the blueberry /cranberry 
research center in Washington 
Township, N.J. 

The move was explained by Dr. 
Roger Wyse, senior associate direc- 
tor of the New Jersey Agricultural 
Experiment Station, at the recent 
1989 winter meeting of the Ameri- 
can Cranberry Growers Associa- 
tion (ACGA). 

At Washington Township, a joint 
federal, state and local effort will 
address cranberry and blueberry 
breeding, cultured, local disease and 
insect problems and viral diseases. 

The search for biological controls 



that can effectively replace chemi- 
cal pesticides and fungicides will 
top the list of priority concerns, 
while continued efforts will be 
devoted to problems related to weed 
control, phytophthora root rot, bee 
pollination, water management, 
crop nutrition, pruning techniques 
and upland bog development, Wyse 
said. 

Despite the threat of the season's 
first major snowstorm, approxi- 
mately 80 people attended the ACGA 
meeting. President Joe Darlington 
presided over a fact-filled session- 
one that proved New Jersey's 
cranberry industry is alive, well 
and expanding. The state's grow- 
ers produced a record high 370,000 
barrels in 1988, with a record high 



average yield of 112 barrels per 
acre. 

HOW did a tropical fungus like phy- 
tophthora root rot get to Massachu- 
setts? Dr. Prank Caruso, extension plant 
pathologist with the Massachusetts 
Cranberry Experiment Station, suspects 
it came with the introduction of mois- 
ture loving rhododendrons and high 
bush blueberries to this northern 
climate. 

Caruso's research has identified 
phytophthora as the fungus causing root 
rot, a disease that appears to be 
enhanced by winter flood and extremely 
wet conditions. 

Measures that are taken to decrease i 
and eliminate this insidious fungus in 
Massachusetts bogs will control prob- 
lems in New Jersey and Wisconsin 
bogs that suffer from a related species 
of the fungus, according to Caruso. 



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Page 6 CRANBERRIES May 1989 



These include: 

• improving cranberry bog drainage 
by cleaning existing ditches and dig- 
ging new ones; 

• sanding affected areas; 

• applying Ridomil via a sprinkler 
system or spot treatment at an oppor- 
tune time in the plant's life cycle (spring 
and fall recommended). An application 
should cover an area at least 20 feet 
beyond the diseased vines and be con- 
tinued for two or three seasons; 

• using Ferbam or Zineb — both show 
promise; 

• selecting disease resistant cranberry 
varieties when replanting (Howes, 
Franklin and Stevens are three varie- 
that seem able to withstand the disease); 

• sterilizing footwear after treating 
an "infected" bog in order to prevent 
disease transmission to healthy bogs. 

Looking ahead, Caruso suggests the 
gene pool of susceptible varieties may 
Ibe improved by breeding them with 
inative cranberries that are resistant to 
Iphytophthora. 

How can you tell if phytophthora has 
jinfected your bogs? Early symptoms 
iinclude: 

'"■ • small areas of dead vines; 

■ • reddening of cranberry foliage in 

Jniidsummer; 

l| • foUage of affected plants turns red 



in early fall; 

• takeover by narrow-leaved golden- 
rod in Eiffected areas; 

• underground runners turn dull olive 
in color; 

• lesion areas become apparent. 
RAY SAMULIS, BurUngton County 

agricultural agent, updated growers on 
his 1988 fungicide and rot control stu- 
dies. Two objectives of his work were to 

(1) obtain Benlate tolerance data and 

(2) compile rot control data. Fungicides 
tested for their ability to control cran- 
berry rot included Bravo, Benlate #4, 
Foilicur, Benlate #2 and Ferbam. 
Criteria studied in measuring each 
product's impact on a crop included 



weight per berry, overall weight of ber- 
ries per plot and total number of berries 
per plot. 

Samulis also cautioned growers that 
employee training and responsible 
application procedures are extremely 
important, given that possible pesti- 
cide and fungicide misuse are very 
much in the forefront of public think- 
ing. To help prevent product abuse and 
insure farm worker SEifety, he recapped 
OSHA and the Superfund Amendments 
and Reauthorization Act (SARA) 
regidations. 

He pointed out an excellent employee 
traiining kit, "Hazard Commimication 
CompUance Kit," that contains perti- 



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nent slides, charts and forms and may 

be purchased for $12 from: 

Superintendent of Documents 
U.S. Government Printing Office 
Washington, D.C. 20402-9325 

Phone: (202) 783-3238 

Ask for "Hazard Communication 
Compliance Kit"— OSHA 3104 and 
GPO order number 929-022-00000-9 

Additional copies of SARA fact sheets, 
including Section 311 - Manufacturer 
Safety Data Sheets, may be obtained 
by making contact with Ray Samulis 
at his Mount Holly, N.J., office, (609) 
265-5050. 

DR. ERWIN "Duke" Eisner, spe- 
cialist in entomology at the Rutgers 
blueberry/cranberry research center, 
looks forward to the day when he will 
be able to provide growers with weekly 
updates that explain when and how to 
counteract infestations of insect pests. 
Last year's fledgling integrated pest 
management (IPM) program was an 
important first step in refining tech- 
niques that will ultimately provide 
growers with this information. 

Eisner reports that 1989 efforts will 
benefit from the use of commercial 
bogs where his team can conduct "side 
by side" comparisons. This format is 
necessary if mecmingful data is to be 
compiled, he said. 

Upcoming IPM research will focus 
on multiple sampling methods, 
temperature data collection, standard 
IPM comparisons £md economic injury 
level research, i.e., "how many dollars' 
worth of impact will different insects 
make at different times of the year?" 

Ultimately, the success of IPM will 



be gauged by the number of barrels of 
healthy cranberries harvested per bog, 
Eisner said. 

DR. ALLAN Stretch, USDA plant 
pathologist at the Rutgers blueberry /- 
cranberry research center, updated 
growers on his efforts to identify an 
antagonistic organism that could serve 
as a biological control for black rot in 
water harvested cranberries. 

During the past year, Stretch has 
sampled thousands of berries from 
locations in New Jersey and Massa- 
chusetts. Three different fungi have 
been identified as the cause of black 
rot. Spores from these fungi, if released 
during harvest, enter the wounds of 
water harvested fruit and cause rot. 

Although not a panacea, Strasseria 
has been identified as an antagonistic 
organism that shows promise as a bio- 
logical control for this problem. If the 
rot producing fungi can be reduced 
prior to harvest, then the incidence of 
black rot found in stored finiit wUl decline. 

DR. NICHOLI Vorsa, associate director 
of the Rutgers blueberry /cranberry research 
center, introduced John Sarracino, the cen- 
ter's newly hired "hands on" plant breeder. 
Sarracino explained that "breeding (cran- ij 
berry varieties) is a long term investment," i, 
one that requires at least five years of care- 
ful monitoring to determine if a newvariety 
demonstrates potential for commercial use. 
Once a variety is made available to growers, , , 
he said, it must be able to produce for a ||) 
minimum of 10 years. , 

Qualities he wants new varieties to pes- |jj 
sess include: 

• increased resistance to field fruit rots; i 

• increeued insect resistance; 

• increased yield per berry size; 

• more reliable yield; 

• increased anthocyanin content; 



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Page 8 CRANBERRIES May 1989 



|. 



earlier and more uniform ripening. 
Since mid-1988, Sarracino has monitored 
the pollination of 81 cranberry variety crosses 
to determine which are most successful. Self 
pollination as well as cross pollination has 
occurred in these samples. Seeds found in 
berries resulting from these crosses vary in 
number, depending on variety. In 1990, 
these test varieties will be transplanted 
from a greenhouse to a bog setting, where 
;he roguing process of least promising var- 
eties will begin. 

Sarracino's future plans include housing 
in extensive germplasm collection at one 
ocation to allow comparisons under similar 
londitions; giving researchers access to 
;enetic£dly identical material, and provid- 
ng breeders with a positive system of iden- 
ifying their material. Data garnered from 
his germplasm collection will be entered 
nd stored in research center computers. 
'liis systematic monitoring should lead to 
he identification of varieties that are genet- 
:ally resistant to diseases, including 
hytophthora. 

JACK MATTHENIUS, apiarist with 
16 N.J. Department of Agriculture, asked 
)r better communication between beekeep- 
rs and growers while investigation con- 
nues into the possible cau8e(s) of the loss of 
jveral hundred colonies of bees in 1988. 
He observed cranberry bogs and blueb- 
Ty fields are often adjacent to one another, 
laking it necessary for colonies to be kept 
1 an area for great lengths of time. To date, 
[atthenius said, there is no conclusive data 
I indicate that pesticides used on these 
•ops are the culprits. However, traces of 
ssticides have been found in pollen. 
WhUe the level of pesticide ingestion these 
sects can safely tolerate is being deter- 
ined, Matthenius suggests remedial mea- 
' iires that may be taken to help avoid future 
lises include: 

• whenever possible, remove hives before 
]>gs are sprayed; 

• allow adequate ventilation within 
I Ives— don't stack colonies. 

I Matthenius also recommended that 
litgers University's vacant position of bee 



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specialist be filled. Such a researcher is 
needed to address the problem of tracheal 
mite in bees and to develop a breeding pro- 
gram that will produce domesticated bees 
willing to gather 90% of their pollen from 
cranberry blossoms, he said. He emphas- 
ized that the Africanized bee can't be toler- 
ated in New Jersey. 

ONGOING evaluation of tundra swan 
damage in New Jersey's cranberry bogs by 
the N.J. Division of Fish, Game tmd Wildlife 
shows destruction is decreasing, it was 
revealed at the meeting. Data compiled 
from growers responding to division questi- 



onnaires indicates crop losses decreased 
from 9.350 barrels worth $503, 184 in 1986 to 
7,202 barrels worth $396,137.50 in 1987. 

A variety of techniques, ranging from 
spotlights, shellcrackers and propane can- 
nons to scarecrows and flagging were held 
as responsible for the decline. However, 
equipment and manpower costs needed to 
implement deterrents have increased fixim 
$33,547 during 1985-86 to $42,554 during 
198&^7. 

Despite decline in crop damage, the tim- 
dra swan population is on the increase and 
their search for red root tubers found in 





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CRANBERRIES May 1989 Page 9 



cranberry bogs continues. Bog damage and 
vine uprooting are directly related to the 
swans' nocturnal search for this weed. 

Although growers' firustration with the 
problem remains high, Bill Haines Jr. spoke 
for the majority of ACGA members when he 
opposed a hunting season on the birds. 

"ITus would be a public relations disas- 
ter," Haines said. 

Maintenance of "cleaner" bogs, coupled 
with the previously mentioned passive 
techniques, remain the only legitimate means 
for discouraging the birds. Permits for shell 
crackers and propane cannons may be 
obtained by calling Ed Butler at the USDA 
animal damage control section: (201) 
647-4109. 

AN'raONY PAPA880, senior special 
agent, U.S. Immigration and Naturaliza- 
tion Service (INS), explained that the 
Immigration Reform and (Dontrol Act of 
1986 stipulates that an employer should 
hire only American citizens and aliens who 
are authorized to work in the United States. 

He said that the act's Form 1-9 is "great 
for a factory, but poor for a farm," but that a 
grower must comply with the law by filling 
out this form for each employee hired after 
Nov. 6, 1986 or be liable for a $1,000 fine per 
person. A Handbook for Employers distrib- 
uted by PapasBo to grov/era clearly explfdns 
the procedure for completing this form and 
includes the toll free number— 1-800-777- 
7700 — that may be called if an employer 
wants additional information. 



FRAN BROOKS. N.J. Farm Bureau, 
then explained an identification card sys- 
tem used i n Flo rida that may^be legally 
implemented in New Jersey. Once an 
employee completes an 1-9 form, it is incor- 
porated into a badge that is worn while the 
employee is on the job. It allows him/her to 
move firom farm to farm without dupUcat- 
ing paperwork auid prevents a iaira employer 
firom being repeatedly audited. 

Brooks stressed that whatever system is 
used in New Jersey, complicmce with the 
law is mandatory. She reminded growers 
that crew leaders and employers are jointly 
culpable if they fail to implement the law. 

PRESIDENT DARLINGTON told 
growers that their testimonies are invited at 
the August 1989 Cranberry Marketing 
Committee hearing to be held in New Jer- 
sey. Of particular interest will be the non- 
transferable "roUing" base concept and the 
method proposed for handling allocation 
during times of surplus production. 

Named as ACGA officers for 1989-90 were: 
Ernest Bowker, president; Katie Darling- 
ton, vice president and secretary; Dr. Paul 
Eck, treasurer; Edward V. lipman, ACGA 
delegate to the N.J. Agricultural Clonven- 
tion, and Thomas Darlington, ACGA alter- 
nate delegate to the N.J. Agricultural 
C!onvention. 



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For more information contact: Dr. Akhtar Khwaja, Ph.D. 

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Page 10 CRANBERRIES May 1989 




MASSACHUSETTS 

By IRVING E. DEMORANVILLE 

Dr. Robert Devlin of the Massachusetts 
Cranberry Experiment Station attended the 
annual meeting of the Weed Science Society 
of America Feb. 6-1 in Dallas. Bob presented 
a paper on his weed research and also Is serv- 
ing as a member of the research committee. 
Dr. Devlin also attended a board of directors 
meeting of CAST in Washington, D.C., from 
Feb. 21-23. 



S 



Dr. Frank Caruso of the station spoke to 
New Jersey growers at their annual winter 
T' meeting Feb. 22 and 23 in Medford, N.J. Dr. 
Caruso also attended a meeting held by the 
Rhone-Poulenc Co. In Baltimore on Feb. 27 
end 28. The purpose of the meeting was to 
discuss uses of the fungicide Allette for con- 
trol of root rot. 



WISCONSIN 

The Wisconsin Supreme Court ruled March 
1 that the state Department of Natural 
Resources does not have regulatory control 
jver the dams of cranberry growers. The rui- 
ng overturned an appeals court decision In 
lehalf of the DNR. Growers Jeffrey and Bar- 
)ara Tenpas of Preston had challenged the 
DNR, citing an 1867 law that gave growers 
;ontrol over their dams. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

February was just slightly below normal in 



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Appraisals 

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Old Cordwood Path 

Duxbury, MA 02332 

(617)934-6076 



temperature, averaging 0.2 degrees a day 
below normal. Maximum temperature was 53 
degrees on the 1st and 21st and the minimum 
was 7 degrees on the 26th. 

Precipitation totaled 3.18 inches, about 1/3 
Inch below normal. There were 213 days with 
measurable precipitation, with 1.02 inches on 
the 25th as the greatest storm. We are nearly 4 
Inches below normal for January and Febru- 
ary and about the same amount behind 1988. 
For the period December through February, 
we are only at 48% of normal precipitation. 
There was a total of 13'/? Inches of snow for 
the month. Sunshine was a record low total. 

I.E.D. 



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Grower wishes to purchase 
an existing cranberry marsh. 

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(715)421-0917 
(715)593-2385 




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SURVEYORS 



Extensive experience in all aspects of cranberry 
land development: evaluation, purchase, survey, 
design, permit acquisition, phased construction and 
planting both in wetlands and uplands. 

Have references. Will travel. 

Contact: Will Lee 

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Wisconsin Rapids, Wl 54494 

(715)424-3131 




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CRANBERRIES May 1989 Page 11 




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* Best application and safety equipment for your needs. 

* Quality aerial applications. 

■k Proven frost warning equipment. Don't take chances — buy the best. 

* Experienced cranberry consulting service offering pheromone traps and 
baits. 

* Right to know training. 

■k Culvert Pipe — All sizes — steel, aluminum, and poly. 

* Ditch Mud Mats — Strong — lightweight — durable. 

* Burlap Picking Bags — Best for your money. 
■k Sanding by helicopter. 



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William D. Chamberlain 

461 Mary's Pond Rd. 
Rochester, MA 02770 

Office: 295-2731 
Evening: 763-8956 
Fax:(508)291-1417 



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Bennie developed his software after years vices, Irvine, Calif. 




Bfuitrot. 
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^ It's hard enough to bring in a good 
^^ cranberry crop without the threat of fruit 
rot diseases. 

That's why cranberry growers are turning to 
a better way to control fruit rot. Bravo 720. 

Bravo delivers consistent, first-rate control 
of all the major fruit rot diseases that threaten 
cranberries. Plus leaf and twig blight 
(Lophodermium), too. 

And that's backed by results of eight years 
of testing which show that Bravo 720 is more 
effective on fruit rot diseases than all other 
fungicides. 

What's more, Bravo won't adversely affect 
fruit color. Or leave any lingering odor after 
application. 

And remember, you can apply Bravo with con- 
ventional spray equipment or through sprinkler 
irrigation. The advanced flowable formulation 
of Bravo 720 is easy to handle, easy to mix. 

So, this season, use Bravo 720 to protect your 
cranberry crop from fruit rot diseases. Just make 
your first spray at early bloom and stick to a 
regular 10- to 14-day schedule. 

End the threat of these fruit rot diseases and 
bring in a bigger yield come harvest. 

Bravo. Because you give it all you've got. 

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5966 Heisley Road, P.O. Box 8000, 
Mentor, OH 44061-8000. 



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omputer Company 
Jpdates Software 

Mark Bennie, president of Cranberry 
Computer Inc., Wareham, Mass., announced 
•ecently that his company has developed a 
lew version of Cranberry Growers System 
COS), a production and chemical informa- 
ion software package designed specifically 
or cranberry growers. 

The new release of CGS features incentive 
)ayment calculations and expanded chemi- 
al, fertilizer and sand application man- 
igement capabilities. 

"Extensive use of menus and help screens 
nake CGS easy to use, even for those with 
10 computer experience," Bennie says. 

Thirteen growers in Massachusetts, 
Washington and Wisconsin currently use 

GS. 

Cranberry Computer has subdivided CGS. 
i'or example, a grower can buy a chemical 
nd fertilizer system or just the chemical 
ortion, all of which can be integrated into 
lie overall CGS. 

For growers with fewer than 15 acres, 
tennie has designed a smaller, less expen- 
ive version CEilled the Limited Edition CGS. 

Cranberry Computer also is introducing 
he Checkbook System, a fully functional 
iccounting system which can be used alone 
T be integrated with CGS. 

The Wareham company also offers spe- 
Halized software for handlers and chemical 
ipplicator and sales businesses. 



Bennie developed his software after years 
of consulting growers and individucds in 
grower related businesses. 

Inquiries can be directed to Debbie Noble 
or Mark Bennie at Cranberry Computer. 

HOLDING'S ACQUIRES DEMMA 

Demma Fruit Co., Lincoln, Neb., head- 
quartered fresh fruit and produce whole- 
saler, has been acquired by John Gait Hold- 
ing's Ltd., Omaha. Demma was represented 
in the transaction by Geneva Business Ser- 



vices, Irvine, Calif. 

FRENCH CROP COVER MAKER 
SETS UP AMERICAN MARKETER 

Sodoca, leading European manufacturer 
of row crop covers, announces establish- 
ment of American Agrifabrics, an Atlanta, 
Ga., based subsidiary that will market its 
Agryl brand of covers to U.S. farmers. 

Formerly, Sodoca distributed its spimbonded 
polypropylene covers through International 
Paper Co. 



14 



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Middleboro, MA 02346 



Tractors 2 & 4 wheel drive — 12-90 hp. 

Compact Excavators 1 '/? to 6 ton 

Wheel Leaders V? to ^U yd. 

Water Cooled Diesel Engines 4 to 104 hp. 

Al\ Types of Implements 
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Frost Alarms 

Thermometers 

Chemical Application Equipment 

Kubota K-35 Rental 



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Carver, MA 02330 



Phone: 

(508) 866-4429 



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t 



CRANBERRIES May 1989 Page 13 



Calcium Concentration 
In Cranberry Shoots 



MALCOLM N. DANA and SUE STEINMANN 

Department of Horticulture 

University of Wisconsin/Madison 

Abstract: Cranberry cuttings 'McFarlin' were grown in solution cultures 
in a glasshouse to produce tissues for determination of critical concentra- 
tion of Ca necessary for maximum shoot growth. All shoot growth was 
harvested on 3 dates following growth intervals of 77 days, 40 days and 52 
days. Tissue Ca concentration varied from 0.04% to 0.27% in the many 
samples. Shoot growth reached a maximum with approximately 0.10% 
tissue Ca. 



The critical concentration for 
essential elements in plant tissue is 
a useful parameter in the interpre- 
tation of leaf analyses. For the 
cranberry, Vaccinium macrocarpon 
Ait. critical concentrations were 
estimated for P(3) and K(2) and 



"normal" concentrations were 
proposed for several mineral ele- 
ments (1,4,5). The "normal" con- 
centration for Ca in cranberry shoot 
growth was set at the 0.30 to 0.60% 
range because that was the con- 
centration found in healthy, pro- 



ductive vines harvested in the field 

(1). 

Cranberry cuttings 'McFarlin' 
were rooted in aerated distilled 
water. Upon initiation of shoot 
growth 8 cuttings were placed in 
each 2 liter plastic container with 
nutrient solution. Five replicates 
and 7 treatment solutions were 
provided for the experiment — a total 
of 35 containers and 280 cuttings. 
All shoot material (leaves and stems) 
firom the 8 cuttings per container 
was harvested for dry weight and 
Ca concentration determinations. 

The solutions provided concen- 
trations of nutrients as follows: 100 
ppm NHy-N, 15ppm P, 48 ppm Mg, 
176 ppm S, .27 ppm each of B and 



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Page 14 CRANBERRIES May 1989 



Mn, .13 ppm Zn, .03 ppm Cu, .01 
ppm Mo, 4.0 ppm Fe in equal con- 
centrations from Fe So4 and Fe 
EDTA. Treatment concentrations 
were set for the several treatments 
at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 32 ppm Ca and a 
no Ca control. Nitrate nitrogen 
supply ranged from 0.7 to 22.4 ppm 
as the Ca concentration ranged 
from 2 to 32 ppm. Solutions were 
maintained at pH 4.5 + - 0.3. The 
plants depleted the solutions of 
nutrients for the assigned growth 
period. Solution strength was 
renewed at the start of each growth 
period. 

Plants were maintained in the 
greenhouse under a 16 hour day 
length by supplementing natural 
daylight with fluorescent and 
incandescent lamps. In the first 
and second growth periods from 24 
November to 11 February and 11 
February to 21 March, the green- 
house temperatures fluctuated 
between 16C and 24C, the third 
II. period from 21 March to 12 May 
Jlwas meuntained in the range from 
jl7C to 38C daytime temperatures; 
♦t all new shoot growth for the 8 cut- 
tings in each container was harv- 
ested and the dry weight determined. 



Tissue Ca concentration was 
determined by emission spectro- 
scopy and is presented as percent 
of dry weight. 

In the first growth period the dry 
weight accumulation was restricted 
in the treatment receiving no sup- 
plemental Ca in the solution. Shoots 
in these containers had 0.4% Ca 
which was less than the concentra- 
tion in other treatments. Supple- 
mental Ca in the solution sustained 
shoot growth for the period of test 
when the tissue concentration was 
at the .08% or higher level. 

During the second growth period 
there were no differences in dry 
weight among treatments although 
the tissue concentration of Ca 
ranged from .05% for no Ca added 
to .27% with 8 mg of Ca in the solu- 
tion. The plants had not depleted 
the Ca supply in any treatment 
such that the availability of this 
element limited vegetative growth. 

Analysis of plants after the third 
growth period showed a restriction 
of dry matter accumulation in the 
no Ca plots with a Ca concentra- 
tion of .07% and near maximum 
growth (4.7g) with a tissue Ca con- 
centration of .11%. 



In 2 of 3 cases growth was limited 
with tissue Ca concentrations of 
.04% and .07% and in all 3 growth 
periods growth reached a maximum 
with tissue Ca concentration at 
.11% or more. The critical concen- 
tration of Ca for 'McFarlin' cran- 
berries grown in solution culture at 
pH 4.5 is approximately .10%. 

Literature Cited 

1. Dana, M.N. 1981. Foliar nutrient 
concentration studies. IV, Proposed 
standards. Cranberries 45(10):10-11. 

2. Dana, M.N. and Sue Steinmann. 1986. 
Critical concentration of potassium 
in 'Stevens' cranberry. Cranberries: 
In press. 

3. Greidanus, T. and M.N. Dana. 1972. 
Cranberry growth related to tissue 
concentration and soil test 
phosphorous. J. Am. Soc. Hort. Sci. 
97:326-328. 

4. Medappa, K.C. and M.N. Dana. 1970. 
The influence of pH, Ca, P and Fe on 
the growth and composition of the 
cranberry plant. Soil Science 109 
(4):2S0-263. 

5. Shawa, A.Y., C.H. Shanks Jr., P.R. 
Bristow, M.N. Shearer and A.P. Poole. 
1984. Cranberry production in the 
Pacific Northwest. Pacific North- 
west Cooperative Extension Bull. 247. 



Table 1. Relationship between dry matter accumulation and tissue 
Ca concentration in solution culture grown 'McFarlin' 
cranberry shoots. 



ILlligrams 

Ca in 
iDlution 














Growth 


Period 












A 


ni 


Davs) 






B 


(40 DavJ 


.) 






C 


(52 


Davs") 




D. W. 
Grams 


Tissue 
Ca 

% 


Ca 
Recove 


ry 


D. W. 
Grams 


Tissue 
Ca 

% 




Ca 
Recove 

mp 


ry 


D. W. 
Grams 


Ti 


ssue 
Ca 
% 


Ca 
Recovery 

me 







1.8 




.04 


0.7 




1.4 


.05 




0.7 




2.9 




.07 


2.0 


2 




2.5 




.08 


2.0 




1.6 


.17 




2.7 




3.9 




.07 


2.7 


4 




2.8 




.11 


3.1 




1.4 


.24 




3.4 




4.2 




.08 


3.4 


8 




2.9 




.16. 


4.6 




1.5 


.27 




.4.0 




4.7 




.11 


5.2 


16 




2.6 




.16 


4.2 




1.4 


.26 




3.6 




4.7 




.16 


7.5 


32 




2.7 




.16 


4.3 




1.3 


.26 




3.4 




4.1 




.20 


8.2 


64 




2.3 




.17 


3.9 




1.5 


.23 




3.5 




4.9 




.18 


8.8 



S.D. 



i«»t 



.41 



,04 



N.S. 



.03 



.61 .05 

CRANBERRIES May 1989 Page 15 




Confusion Reigns 

Remember when science was assumed to be exact and 
unequivocal? Nobody today makes that assumption. Poor 
Descartes must be rolling over in his grave. 

Nowhere is there more confusion than in the field of agricul- 
tural chemicals. Take the recent controversy over Alar. On the 
same day, one could watch several TV panels or read a dozen or 
so newspaper and magazine acoimts in which scientists were 
spht over whether the chemical posed a threat. No wonder the 
poor public is confused. 

Yesterday it was Alar. Today it is aldicarb, a bug killer used 
on potatoes and bananas. Tomorrow and the next day, other 
chemicals will be imder attack, responsible or otherwise. 

Part of the problem is lack of data and a monitoring system 
that many critics say is not up to the challenge of providing 
sure, prompt information about old and new chemicals. 

Says Environmental Protection Agency official Rick Tins- 
worth: "Everything we do is taking too long. It's unacceptable 
in 1989 to spend five years, or even 10 years, going back anf 
forth, back and forth, about the safety of one chemical." 

More research is needed. And more research should be 
funded. 




FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SHOW 
SET FOR JULY IN SOVIET UNION 

Fruits and Vegetables '89 is the title of an 
agricultural trade show to be held in 
Kishinev, the USSR, from July 19 thru 26. 

Featured at the international exhibition 
will be cooling, transportation, bottling, 
sorting and packaging equipment and 
laboratory and control instruments. 

American companies interested in partic- 
ipating are asked to make contact with 
Orbis International of Atherton, Calif., the 
U.S. based organizer of international trade 
shows in the USSR. 

"Due to recent changes in enterprise law, 
businesses in the Soviet Union have greater 
control over the use of profits for invest- 
ment," said Roman Shukman, president of 
Orbis International. "This translates into 
larger funds allocated for new western pro- 
ducts and services." 



O Gapen 

Realty & Insurance 



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for existing marshes or 

undeveloped land. 

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Page 16 CRANBERRIES May 1989 



tic 



Computer News 



How to Use a Data Base 
In Your Business 



Jy CHESTER PETERSON JR. 

You may not have thought of it 
xactly that way, but when you 
irst penciled a note on a 3 x 5 inch 
ard or wrote a name and address 
n a sheet of paper and stuck it in a 
iile folder, you were creating a data 
lase! 

I've done plenty of both. In fact, 
'11 have to admit it. I'm one of 
hose people who store information 
ike a squirrel caching nuts. I have 
ile cabinet drawer after file cabinet 
rawer chock full of semi-organized 
laterial. I also keep a separate 
olodex -style card file, and use yet 
nother stored in a desk drawer. 

Oh my, just ask me and I can 
ome up with just about anything I 
/ant— although it may take me a 




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381 West Grove St. (Rte. 28) 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

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little while, like a couple of hours. 
And, too, often I can't read my 
scrawled handwriting once I do 
find that all-important contact's 
name and phone number. 

A friend of mine is just the 
opposite. He, well, let's call him 
Rex, just can't be bothered to take 
the time to properly file informa- 
tion. He's always losing vital 
address and phone info in the scat- 
tered piles on and around his desk. 

Both of us were prime candidates 
for a computer data base system, 
although for different reasons. 

I can't speak for my friend, but I 
do know that the data base soft- 
ware I bought is j ust about the best 
money I've spent. And I'm still 
learning new ways to sort and use 
the information it provides for my 
business almost every day, too. 

It's amazing how much time it 
saves me . . . how many jobs it can 
do . . . how little time it takes to 



maintain once set up . . . what it 
enables me to do that I couldn't do 
before. 

Basically, what a computer data 
base lets you do is better and more 
effectively organize and present your 
information. 

A computer data base gives you 
these advantages over a B.C. (Before 
Computer) filing system: 

• You can drop information into 
your file in any order at any time. 

• You can also retrieve informa- 
tion from your file in any order at 
any time. 

• You can compile your informa- 
tion automatically. 

• You can summarize and report 
your files in any of several formats, 
whichever is your preference at the 
time. 

There are some disadvantages, 
too: 

• Although keying in new data 
goes as fast as you can type, it isn't 



Vines For Sale 

Ben Lear $3,500 a ton 

Stevens $3,500 a ton 

Crowley $3,500 a ton 

Le Munyon $3,500 a ton 

Searles $3,500 a ton 

$500 a ton less with 50% payment before cutting 

David Zawistowski 
6031 County Highway D (715) 479-4658 
Eagle River, Wl 54521 (715) 479-6546 



CRANBERRIES May 1989 Page 17 



as rapid a storing method as drop- 
ping a sheet of paper into a file 
folder. 

• How you set up your data 
base— its form— to store your 
information is a top priority. You 
need to give this a good bit of 
thought. Before you start, think 
about what results you're going to 
want, then work from there. 

Generally, however, it's possible 
with most data bases to add new 
columns of material and to change 
your data file arrangements later 
on. I wouldn't use a data base lack- 
ing this flexibility. Still, it's best to 
do your planning before beginning 
initial work. 

The first time you open the manual 
that comes with your data base 
software, you're going to be intimi- 
dated. I still am, in fact. 

However, I tried to make it easy 
by thinking of the data base as a 
simple filing cabinet containing 
file folders that, in turn, contain 
sheets of paper. 

Such a sheet of paper — and it can 
be reaaaalllUyyy long— is the guts 
of any data base. Here's where you 
record your specific information in 
"fields." A "field" is a name or 
address or zip code or other indi- 
vidual info you type in. 

Your biggest job is in setting up 
the "form" of the data base so all 
your "fields" are entered in the 
proper order and they're all included. 

Depending on the data base, in 
addition to text entries you may 
also be able to have number fields 



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COMPUTER, INC. 
CRANWARE 

• Growers 

• Handlers 

• Chemical Applications 

• Chemical Resole 

(508) 747-3033 

P.O. Box 1037, Plymouth, MA 02360 



automatically totaled or averaged 
or whatever. 

For example, if you have a large 
company, you can set up your data 
base so you can later sort and pull 
out each salesman who sold more 
than X dollars the last six months 
or .... " 

Enough of theory. Let's set up a 
data base and see how one can be 
utilized in your business. 

Note the examples. I set up an 
entirely fictitious data base of a 
dozen people. In real life, this data 
bf.se could be 120 or 1,200 or 12,000 
people or ... . 

When setting up your data base, 
create it with ease of data entry 
foremost in your mind. Certainly 
include all the information you want, 
but — more important — have it 
appear in a logical format. Aren't 



^ 



you used to first typing titles, the 
names, then addresses, etc.? 

Well, that's the way to initially 
organize your information to speed 
later entering of your data. And 
don't worry overly much that this 
may or may not be the way you 
want to see your information printed 
out later. 

You see, the great thing about 
most computer data bases is that 
you can usually enter your infor- 
mation in any order you wish. Then 
you can arrange it later with virtu- 
ally no effort to have it end up look- 
ing precisely the way you want it. 

I know, that takes some getting 
used to. But it's true. It's just one of 
the things you're going to come to 
appreciate about a computer data 
base. 

Caution: Be especially alert to 






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Page 18 CRANBERRIES May 1989 



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CRANBERRIES May 1989 Page 19 



typographical errors in your entries. 
Your computer can't distinguish 
between "Jones" and "Joness." 

Okay, in the illustrated exam- 
ples, I've made it easy to move from 
title through the names to position, 
company, address, city, state and 
zip code. 

Now's where you start becoming 
creative. What special information 
do you want to record — and later be 
able to pull out? 

I've stuck in two columns for 
sorting plus one for "Remarks." 
You could have a dozen. I used 
some arbitrary symbols in the 
"Category" column that could mean 
the person concerned expressed an 
interest in European business in 
1985 or 1986, for instance, or in the 
Orient or in South America. 

The letters "A," "B," "C" or "D" 
could have any meaning put to 
them you wish. Let's say "A" means 
a top priority business prospect or 
past customer. 

Remember, after you enter all the 
information the easiest way you 



know how, you can later sort and 
arrange it any way you desire. 

You can then print out portions 
of the entire data base. Example: 
All the names arranged alphabeti- 
cally and the accompanying phone 
numbers and zip codes. The possi- 
bilities are endless. 

However, I usually prefer to print 
out all my columns, using a 50 per- 
cent type size reduction feature in 



my software. 

The top example — example 1 — 
shows exactly how I entered the 
information. Example 2 is the same 
except that it's been sorted alpha- 
betically by last name. We could 
have instead sorted in reverse 
alphabetical order, too. 

Or we could have done like I do 
with my personal data base: Sort 
by company alphabetically as first 



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Page 20 CRANBERRIES May 1989 



riority and sort by last name 
liphabetically as second priority. 
' Example 3 is the same list sorted 
iy last name alphabetically only 
pr those with Los Angeles 
ddresses. 

t Example 4 is sorted by last name 
Iphabetically for those listed as 
)85 under the "Category" column. 

' Ixample 5 is the same, but also 
™ orted for the "A" under the "Misc." 
Dlumn. 

That's sorting. Now what if you 
rant to find a name in your data 
ase of 3,000 entries and all you 
an remember is that this fellow 
ves in Seattle? 
Use the "Find" function in the 

TCity" column and have your com- 

juter kick out on your screen all 

j stings in Seattle. He'll be among 

( lem and should be easy to sift out. 

' The computer data base is nor- 

lally used two ways: 1) called up 

ti the screen for quick checks of 

iformation; 2) called up for print- 

ig out various listings. 

I'd like to give you two more 

: leas for things you can do with it. 

1 First, if possible, buy a data base 
lat works with your word process- 



ing software to produce mail merge, 
computer generated personalized 
letters. There are virtually infinite 
ways you can combine the two to 
drum up business. 

Second, you might consider what 
I do. I've printed out three copies of 
various portions of my data base. I 
keep one set of copies in my desk for 
quick references, one in my attache 
case and one in my travel kit. 

Since starting this system, I've 
seldom been at a loss for a name, 
address or phone number for more 
than a couple of seconds. 

Today, my powerful, yet relatively 
inexpensive computer with data 
base software shoved in the diskette 
slot does the job that 20 years ago 
would have required a mainframe 
and 10 years ago a $40,000 
minicomputer. 

Combined, my microcomputer 
hardware and data base software 
is the best "tool" I own. 

(Chester Peterson Jr., former 
departmental editor of a million- 
plus circulation national magazine, 
has written many articles in some 
78 different publications.) 

— Arkin Magazine Syndicate 



45 




Ago 



Lt. Col. Cecil G. Dunn, Army 
Quartermaster Corps, says the mil- 
itary will require 150,000 barrels of 
cranberries for fiscal year 1945 to 
fulfill the eating needs of service 
people. "It is the patriotic duty of all 
growers to consider military require- 
ments, for this is their country and 
the berries are going to their own 
countrymen and actually their own 
sons and relatives," said Dunn. 



Growers at the annual meetings of 
the Southeastern Cranberry Club, 
Rochester, Mass., and the South 
Shore Club, Kingston, Mass., were 
told that farm labor will be scarce 
for the coming growing and harvest- 
ing seasons. Roy E. Moser, state 
secretary, Emergency Farm Labor, 
said the government is expected to 




CRANBERRIES May 1989 Page 21 



make more Jamaicans and Baham- 
ians available. The status of Italian 
prisoners of war is expected to be 
changed shortly, he added, but few, 
if any, he thought, would be availa- 
ble for farm labor. 



"Underproduction was one of our 
chief worries in 1943 and, as I see it, 
one of our chief worries in 1944 may 
also be underproduction," CM. 
Chaney, general manager, American 
Cranberry Exchange, told members 
of the New England Cranberry Sales 
Co. at its annual meeting in the 
Carver, Mass., Town Hall. He said 
the berries sold through the Exchange 
totaled 269,835 barrels and brought 
an average FOB price of $18.72, the 
highest average at which cranber- 
ries had ever been sold. 



Winter floods were coming off 
Wisconsin marshes about April 15 
and, in general, it was thought the 
vines should have come through the 
winter well. Grower/correspondent 
Vernon Goldsworthy said he thought 
Wisconsin would have a crop of 
115,000 to 125,000 barrels in 1944. 



amount of pyrethrum and no rote- 
none were being allocated for cran- 
berry use. He told them to save pyre- 
thrum for the most imperative uses, 
such as control of the bluntnosed 
leafhopper, the blackheaded fireworm 



and possibly the cranberry girdler. 

The Plymouth County, Mass., 
Electric Company called for conser- 
vation of electricity, saying "speed- 
ing victory is what counts now." 



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Oregon had a very dry winter and 
a spring characterized by many light, 
early morning frosts. Some marshes 
reported damage in the first 10 days 
of April, shortly after the winter 
flood had been let out. 



Dr. Henry J. Franklin, director, 
Massachusetts Cranberry Experi- 
ment Station, warned growers that 
only one quarter of the normal 



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GROWERS 

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Page 22 CRANBERRIES May 1989 




The primordial growth of 
the flowers and the upright 
in terminal fruit bud . , , as 
illustrated , , , is now grow- 
ing on the bog. Growth that 
needs constant attention to 
protect it from insects. 



Know the Insects 

Color photographs of all these insects and more are now 
arranged with text in a portfolio that is available. 

The portfolio endeavors to bring together the words of research 
complementing the photographs and making a summary of 
cranberry insect information that will be of uSe to the cranberry 
grower for a lifetime. 

The portfolio is available for $100 and, if you wish to examine a 
copy, telephone (609) 894-8556 evenings around 6 p.m. or write to: 

Waiter Z. Fort 

P.O. Box 183 

Pemberton, NJ 08068 




CRANBERRIES May 1989 Page 23 



Take Good 

Care of Yourself 

Have an Ocean Spray! 








CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 



June 1989 



Vol. 53, No. 6 



Migratory 
Beekeeper's 
Work Is 
Never Done 



Pollen 
Source 
And 
Fruit Set 



Ocean 
Spray, 
Decas 
Settle 



i 



Co 




The Pilgrim stands behind 
every commercial loan 

RovCyr 
makes. 

And that's a 
promise. 

Call him on it at 746-3300. 

The Pilgrim is a symbol of strength, integrity and experience; 
and it best personifies the resources Roy Cyr offers every business 
that turns to him for help. 

A vice president of our commercial banking operation, Roy has 
over 20 years of banking know-how. His expertise has helped to 
earn us a reputation as The Answer Bank. 

Backed by the superior lending capabilities of Plymouth Savings 
Bank, Roy can design a commercial lending package with the 
attractive rates and fast turnaround time that you need. 

This is the power and the promise of the Pilgrim. 

CaU Roy Cyr at 746-3300 




Main Office: Wareham, (508) 295-3800; Cotuit, (508) 428-1300; 
Duxbury, (617) 934-0101; Falmouth, (508) 548-3000; 
Marion, (508) 748-2919; Mattapoisett, (508) 758-4936; 
Middleboro, (508) 946-1777; North Plymouth, (508) 747-1600; 
Plymouth, (508) 746-3300; Sandwich, (508) 888-4444; 
Teaticket, (508) 540-5002 



Plymouth 
la Savings 
m Bank' 

Member FDIC/DIFM 



Page 2 CRANBERRIES June 1989 



Bloom Time Is 
Busy as Bee Time 
For Beekeeper 



You might call Horace Bell an air traffic 
lontroller and you wouldn't be far wrong. 

Actually, he's a migratory beekeeper and he 
lirects the flight of his winged minions from his 
:ontrol tower in Deland, Fla. Right now he's as 
msy as a bee himself. 

The Horace Bell Honey Company, you see, has 
ibout 30,000 hives. In each of those hives about 
)0, 000 bees are buzzing. A goodly number of them 
vill be gathering nectar on cranberry bogs in 
klassachusetts and Wisconsin this month. 

So Horace, who'd rather will be an outdoor man, 
vill be indoors, dispatching tractor trailers loaded 
vith hives for cranberry country. The bees will 
perform their role as pollinators for about a month 
ind then be moved out. 

"Everybody wants the bees all at once," says 
iorace. "Then, as fast as they wanted them in, 
hey want them out. Ten growers will call up at 
?nce, saying they want the bees out tomorrow — or 
yesterday." 

j Most growers take two hives per acre. The cost: 
1)35 per hive. 

Do the bees get results? In fruit set and yield? 
)ver the years, Robert S. Filmer, Philip E. Marucci, 
VilKam E. Tomlinson Jr., Malcolm N. Dana, D.W. 
inderson, G.W. Eaton and other cranberry experts 
Lave attested that they do. 

Bell has another barometer of success. 

"The best testimonial," he says with a chuckle, 
is when they make those checks out." 

The 43-year-old Bell got started in beekeeping at 
he age of 4. 

"My grandfather gave me and my brother hives," 
le said. "And I've been at it ever since." 

Beekeeping today, however, is big business. Bell 
leclares. 

"Most of the smaller ones are going out of busi- 
less," he says. "Either you get to be more efficient 
r you don't last." 




HORACE and Luella Bell don't get much of 
a chance to get dressed up in their Sunday 
best at this time of year. 




CHECKING on the condition of his hives is a never 
ending task for Horace Bell. He's got 30,000 of 
them. 



(Please turn the page) 



COVER PHOTO 

WHILE these migratory honey- 
bees are inside their hive 
working, other bees are out 
collecting nectar and pollinat- 
ing cranberries. The result? 
Increased fruit set and better 
yield. A story about one of the 
largest migratory beekeepers 
starts on this page. 

(Photo by Norman S. Gray) 

CRANBERRIES June 1989 Page 3 



Bell's $2 million business employs 
22 full-time workers as well as day 
labor and part-time help during the 
busy season. The company's 
property includes a dozen trucks 
and a dozen fork lifts and Horace 
Bell Honey leases the tractor trail- 
ers that carry huge loads of hives. 

Being situated in sunny Florida 
means that the honey company is 
busy all year long. 

The honeybees are used in Flor- 
ida for citrus. Then they go to 
Maine and New Jersey for blueber- 
ries. Cranberries follow. Bell's 
honeybees also are used to polli- 
nate fruits and vegetables in 14 
other states. 

For example, the bees assist pol- 
lination in North Dakota's alfalfa 
fields and upwards of 3 million 
acres of sunflowers. 

Bell claims to be the largest 
supplier of bees for cranberries and 
blueberries in North America. 

All this migration requires the 
logistical skills of a military com- 
mander. Most of the movement 
takes place at night, with as many 



as half a million bees borne onto a 
truck by pallets. For long trips, 
screenlike nets are flung over the 
load. 

The reason for moving at night is 
because 10 to 20 percent of the bees 
are buzzing about during the day 
looking for nectar. At night, they're 
all in the hive. 

In between moving honeybees, 
there are other chores to perform. 
New colonies have to be started. 
Hives must be repaired and replaced. 
The insects must be checked for 
diseases and parasites. 

To accomplish the latter, Horace 
Bell Honey has its own laboratory, 
headed up by Luella Bell. She and 
Horace got married right after high 
school graduation. They have three 
daughters. All work in the com- 
pany, as do the husbands of the 
two who are married. 

Mr. and Mrs . Bell also have three 
grandchildren, 5, 4 and 3 in age, 
and they're getting an early start 
in beekeeping. 

Bell, tongue in cheek, says he's 
thinking of hiring private tutors 



for the kids so that they're not too 
exposed to the outside world. 
Otherwise, he explains, they won't 
want to put up with the long 
hours— "and at certain times of the 
year, it's day and night." 

In some cases. Bell deals with 
middlemen. In Massachusetts, for 
example, he works through Merri- 
mack Valley Apiaries and Mendes 
Apiaries. In other cases, he deals 
directly with cranberry growers and 
other farmers. 

Actually, farming bees out for 
pollination is only part of the 
Horace Bell Honey operation. 
Another — and larger — part of the 
business is honey production. 

Horace Bell Honey is the nation's 
largest producer of orange blossom 
honey. Most of the honey is shipped 
to Europe in 55 gallon drums. Spain 
is a particularly larger importer. 

All told, the company produces £ 
million pounds of honey each year 

You can detect in Horace Bell's 
voice a deep appreciation of th( 
bee, which has fascinated humar 
beings throughout the centuries 



l^^^J.^J l .^J l .M.M^J l OJu^M.^JL^^v^^^ 



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2323 Jackson Street 
Oshkosh, Wl 54901 

* Cranberry Soil Analysis 

* Cranberry Vine Analysis 

* Cranberry Water Analysis, 
Usage & Interpretation 

* Liquid & Dry Fertilizer 
Recommendation 

* Soil Problems & Consultation 

* Seminars 

* Cranberry Crop Monitoring 
Program, testing and 
monitoring nutrient status 
with 30 day intervals during 
during the growing season. 



Serving Cranberry 
Growers in U.S.A. 
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of Experience on 
Acid Soil Interaction 



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cranberry soil and over 
17,500 cranberry vines 
tests since 1984, and 
gave fertilizer 
recommendations with 
great success. 



Highly computerized cranberry soil, tissue and water testing program in 
U.S.A. and Canada. 

For more information contact: Dr. Akhtar Khwaja, Ph.D. 

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Page 4 CRANBERRIES June 1989 




Coast Cranberries IAjA. 

Member of Ocean Spray Co-operative 

Offers 

a Rare Opportunity to Invest in 

Cranberry Farming in British Columbia 

CANADA 

HISTORY: 

Coast Cranberries Ltd. was established in Fort Langley in 1981 on 320 
acres of high quality peat land. In 1982 the land was cleared and planted; 
later, a further 70 acres were purchased bringing the gross acreage to 390. 
By 1989 the farm has been developed into 271 planted acres divided into 
52 separate fields. The fields are beautifully laid out with vines which are 
at different stages of growth. Should Ocean Spray Co-operative decide to 
allocate new acreage for planting, it is fortunate that adjacent land is 
available for purchase. 

The farm is equipped with state of the art computerized sprinkler and 
frost control system, reservoir for water storage, and a pumping system 
that keeps fields well drained and pumps water from the Fraser River 
when required. 

The buildings on the property consist of a manager's house, a machine 
shop, machinery and equipment sheds, and 12 pump stations. 
Coast Cranberries Ltd. has excellent management and work teams. It has 
the potential of being one of the most successful and up to date cranberry 
farms in North America. 

TERMS: 

$17,606,000 CASH 
OR 

$7,040,000 for 40% of the farm with options to purchase further shares at 
market value. 

For further information about this investment opportunity, please contact: 

KEN HOPKINS AT (604) 276-8069 
252 - 7671 Minora Blvd., B.C., Canada V6Y 1Z3 



\\\\\^^\\\\\\\\K\^^X^^^K^^.K^^^^.^.^.^.^^^^^^^^^^99^^^^^^^^^^^*^^.^^^^^.^.^.^.^.l^^^.^.^.l^^^^^^^^^^^^^.^.^.^.^.^.^.w^r^e^ 



CRANBERRIES June 1989 Page 5 



Writer Mary Louise Coleman, 
author of Bees in the Garden & 
Honey in the Larder, tells, for 
example, of depictions of migra- 
tory beekeeping on walls and sar- 
cophagi from ancient Egypt. 

Horace will elaborate on the many 
specialized tasks performed by a 
colony of bees and will tell you how 
the creatures navigate by the sun 
and how unerring their homing 
instinct is. 

When you move bees, he says, 
you have to move them beyond a 
radius of three miles or they'll go 
right back to their old foraging site. 

And he'll tell you the bee has no 
equal as a worker. 

"The bee doesn't age chronologi- 
cally," explains Bell. "It ages phy- 
siologically. They literally fly 
themselves to death. Their wings 
wear out. They usually collapse in 
the field and die." 

Not native to America, the 
honeybee is a European import. 

"The Indian called it the white 
man's fly," notes Bell. 

The honey company president 
says the migratory honeybee is 
becoming more and more impor- 



CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

SEND CORRESPONDENCE TO: 

P.O. BOX 249 

COBALT CT 06414 

(203) 342-4730 

Fax #: (203) 342-1977 

PUBLISHER & EDITOR: BOB TAYLOR 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: CAROLYN GILMORE 
(508) 763-5206 

ADVISORS & CORRESPONDENTS 

MASSACHUSETTS — Irving E Oemoranville, 
Director. Cranberry Experiment Station. 

NEW JERSEY— Phillip E Marucci. Cranberry & Blueberry 
Specialist. Buddtown; Elizat>eth G Carpenter. Chatswonti 

NOVA SCOTIA — Robert A Murray. Horticulturist, Berry 
Crops. Research Station, Truro 

OREGON — Arthur Poole. Coos County Extension Agent, 
Coquille 

WASHINGTON — Azmi Y Shawa, Horticulturist and 
retired Director. Coastal Washington Research & Extension 
Unit. Long Beach 

WISCONSIN — Tod D Planer. Farm Management Agent. 
Wood County 

CRANBERRIES It published monthly by DIvarallled Periodi- 
cals. Wtllwyn Drive, Poniand CT 06480. Second class pot- 
tage It paid at lh« Portland, Conn. Pott Oftlca. Price It $1 S a 
year. $28 lor two yaart, $2 a copy In the U.S.; $17 a year In 
Canada: {20 a year In another countrlat. Back coplet: $2.50, 
Including pottage. Copyright 1 988 by DIverelflad Parlodlcalt. 

ISSN: 0011-0787 

Pottmatter. itnd Form 3749 to: 

CRANBERRIES 

P.O. BOX 249 

COBALT CT 06414 

Page 6 CRANBERRIES June 1989 



tant for pollination. That's because 
pesticide spraying has taken such 
a heavy toll on natural pollinators, 
he adds. 

"Pesticides are not as bad as 
they used to be," Bell says. "Ten or 
15 years ago, they were terrible. 
The growers are usually cautious 
and will spray when the bees aren't 
around. Usually the damage is from 
the spraying of other crops." 

Needless to say, Horace and 
Luella are champions of integrated 



pest management and the increas- 
ing reliance on biological controls. 
Aside from manmade threats, the 
Bell bee stock is beset by many 
natural enemies. Horace and Luella 
must be on a constant lookout for 
everything from brood disease to 
trachea and varroa mites to nosema 
spores. And they must take rapid 
action, which means burning a hive 
in the case of brood disease and 
introducing menthol to the hive for 
(please turn to page 8) 




BtaE HERON 

GROWER SERVICE 

MOWING (all types) * ditching 

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• Quick Couple Risers 

• Felker Aluminum Flumes & Culverts 

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CRANBERRIES June 1989 Page 7 



trachea mites. 

Any discussion of bee disease 
brings up the question of govern- 
ment inspection. 

Horace recently attended the 
Varroa Negotiated Rulemaking 
Session in Washington, D.C. On 
the one hand, he was happy to see 
that the government was consult- 
ing people who have direct expe- 
rience with bees. On the other hand. 



he was displeased that the feds 
decided to relinquish control to the 
states. 

"Some bees in the course of a 
year might go to six states," 
explains Bell. "It would be nice if 
the federal government would issue 
one certificate. Instead, we've got 
to deal with all of the states. We've 
become experts at filling out per- 



mits. Of course, we don't like it." 

So, like the honeybee, the Horace 
Bell Honey Company must become 
proficient at many tasks. But, to 
Horace, it's all worth it for a busi- 
ness with every prospect of good 
growth. 

"If you eat a cranberry," he says, 
"there's a good chance it's been 
kissed by one of our bees." 



Local Beekeepers Fight Mites 



By CAROLYN GILMORE 

Last year a tracheal mite out- 
break was blamed for killing about 
90 percent of the bees in hives in 
southeastern Massachusetts. This 
year hives in the state's cranberry 
growing region "look pretty good," 
according to Wayne Andrews, state 
bee inspector. 

Some beekeepers have found 
success in treating their hives with 
cough drop variety menthol, a 
method not yet approved by the 
state. The "contraband" can be 
obtained by mail order from out of 
state candy suppliers. The recently 
formed Agricultural Bee Alliance 
is working with the Cape Cod 
Cranberry Growers' Association to 
get emergency labeling for menthol. 

Another dreaded, but expected 
pest has also entered the area: var- 
roa mite. The present infestation is 
low but "is expected to build up" 
this year, Andrews said. 

"We've treated just about all the 
hives we know of in southeastern 
Massachusetts," he added. 

Varroa mite, first detected in the 
U.S. in a Wisconsin apiary in Sep- 
tember 1987, was confirmed in an 
additional 12 states by April 1988. 
Like tracheal mite, it is a parasite 
of honeybees that weakens the 
insect's ability to pollinate plants 
and produce honey. Because var- 
roa multiply quickly, a beekeeper 
may fail to notice their presence 
until serious damage is done. 

"The prognosis is we will never 
get rid of it," said Gus Skamarycz, 
president of the Agricultural Bee 
Alliance. "Under the present regu- 
lations of the pesticide board, the 
only people allowed to use fluvali- 

Page 8 CRANBERRIES June 1989 



nate to combat varroa are bee 
inspectors." 

Presently, there are only two bee 
inspectors in the state to service 
10,000 resident bee colonies and 
oversee the 15,000 or more hives 
from migratory operations. Warren 
Shepard, chief of the bureau of pest 
control, has requested five more 
inspectors for this season. 

The Agricultural Bee Alliance 
was organized this year to open 
communication between pollinators 
and local beekeepers. There are 
between 1,000 and 2,000 resident 
colonies in the cranberry growing 
region. More cranberry growers are 
expressing interest in the option of 



maintaining their own bee colonies 
rather than renting them from 
transient operations, Skamarycz 
said. 

Florida bees expected to service 
the cranberry blossoms are reported 
to be in good shape, following an 
early poor honey flow from the cit- 
rus crop. 

Shepard and Al Carr, chief apiary 
inspector, told the Cape Cod Cran- 
berry Growers' Association that 
migratory bees were inspected and 
treated before leaving Florida. 

About 70 percent of Massachu- 
setts cranberries are pollinated by 
migratory bees originating in 
Florida. 



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Herbicides 
Applied 

Custom Pruning 
Custom Ditching 



Sanding 

Wiping 

Wet Harvesting 

Mowing 

(Mowing includes 
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Flail Mower.) 



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Massachusetts 295-5158 



i 




The cranberry growers' 
seasonal dilemma: too 
m,any destructive insects — 
tipworm., fireworm and 
fruitworm — then too few 
beneficial insects — the pol- 
linating honeybees. 



• ••••• 



Know the Insects 

The major cranberry insects: cranberry girdler, the fireworms, 
tip worm, blossom worm, cranberry fruitworm and Sparganothis 
fruitworm. 

Know the Insects 

The periodic cranberry insects: cranberry scale, fire beetle, 
blossom weevil, armyworm and bluntnose leafhopper. 



Know the Insects 

Color photographs of all these insects and more are now 
arranged with text in a portfolio that is available. 

The portfolio endeavors to bring together the words of research 
complementing the photographs and making a summary of 
cranberry insect information that will be of use to the cranberry 
grower for a lifetime. 

The portfolio is available for $100 and, if you wish to examine a 
copy, telephone (609) 894-8556 evenings around 6 p.m. or write to: 

Walter Z. Fort 

P.O. Box 183 

Pemberton, NJ 08068 



CRANBERRIES June 1989 Page 9 



Pollen Source and Fruit Set of Cranberry 



Malcolm N. Dana, Sue Steinmann and Lynda Goben^ 
Department of Horticulture, University of Wisconsin/Madison 
Abstract. Flowers of 'Stevens' cranberry hand-pollinated with other cul- 
tivars produced seed numbers equal to self -pollinated flowers. Controlled 
pollination of 7 cultivars in all possible combinations in the greenhouse 
produced equivalent fruit set percentages for self- and cross-pollination. 
Field samples of open-pollinated flowers produced fruit set percentages that 
were independent of proximity to cross pollen sources. 



The large cranberry of commerce, 
Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait., is 
grown with single clonal cultivars 
covering many hectares. No provi- 
sion for cross-pollination among 
cultivars is provided. Large crops 
may be harvested from this plant- 
ing system when weather condi- 
tions favor polUnator insect activ- 
ity at blossom time. Fruit set 
percentages may exceed 50% or more 
under favorable conditions. The 
potential for enhancing fruit size 
and fruit set percentage through 
cross-pollination was explored in 
these studies. 



Fruit size in cranberry has been 
positively correlated with seed 
number by several workers (2,3,6). 
These studies did not relate pollen 
source to seed number in the mature 
fruit. Following a number of con- 
trolled self-pollinations and cross- 
pollinations in a hybridization 
program, Bain (1) suggested that 
self-pollinated fruit often had fewer 
seeds than cross-pollinated fruit. 
Marucci (4) and Marucci and FUmer 
(5) reported a higher fruit set per- 
centage when a cultivar was located 
for easy cross-pollination access by 
insects. 



Dormant, hardwood cuttings with 
flower buds were collected from the 
field in April. Cuttings 10 cm long 
were placed immediately in 2 liter 
plastic containers with the basal 4 
cm in aerated nutrient solution in a 



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GROWERS 

REALTY 

Listings of buyers and 

sellers welcomed on 

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and upland. 

Appraisals 

DOUGLAS R. BEATON 

E. Sandwich, Mass 

02537 

(617)888-1288 






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Growing cranberries is 
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harvesting equipment, air 
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spreading equipment, and 
flow gates or flumes is 
something we do that can be 
of service to you. 

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(608) 378-4137 



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790 Federal Furnace Rd. 

Plymouth, MA 02360 

Tel. (508) 746-6048 



I 



Page 10 CRANBERRIES June 1989 



ijlasshouse with temperatures fluc- 
vUating diumally above a minimum 
18 C and reaching 45 C on sunny 
days later in the development 
period. Natural daylight was sup- 
plemented with incandescent and 
fluorescent lamps to maintain a 16 
hour day length. Each container 
carried mineral elements sufficient 
to maintain 10 cuttings in a healthy 
status for the duration of the flow- 
ering and fruiting period. Distilled 
water was added as needed to 
maintain solution levels. Cranberry 
cuttings in aerated solution develop 
roots in 10-14days. Terminal flower 
shoots develop with leaves, flow- 
srs, and fruits comparable to those 
found on undisturbed plants in the 
5eld. 

In the first trial designed to mea- 
sure the effect of a pollen source on 
seed number per ft"uit, cuttings of 
Stevens' were grown to the hook 
stage (individual flower buds 
separated from the main stem axis) 
ivhen all but the most advanced 
bud on a cutting was removed, 
leaving one "hook" per cutting. 
One day before petal separation 
(anthesis) this flower was emascu- 
lated to prevent any possible self- 
pollination of the flower. Two days 
after emasculation the receptive 
stigma was dusted with fresh pollen 
from 1 of 4 alien cultivars or with 
'Stevens' pollen. Thus 'Stevens' was 
the seed cultivar and 'Ben Lear,' 
iSearles,' 'Crowley,' 'McFarlin' and 
Stevens' were the pollen sources. 



i 



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• Chemical Applications 

• Chemical Resale 

(508) 747-3033 

P.O. Box 1037, Plymouth, MA 02360 



Pollinated flowers set fruit in all 
cases, and the fruit grew normally. 
At maturity the number of seeds 
per fruit was determined and the 
percentage of fruit in various seed 
number classes was calculated 
(Table 1). Seed number per fruit 
ranged from 1 to 39 with no con- 
sistent differences in seed number 
per fruit assignable to pollen source. 

In 2 separate trials, cuttings of 7 
cultivars were grown in solutions 
as previously described. All flow- 
ers were allowed to develop nor- 
mally and no emasculation was 
done. At the time of, and 2 days 
after anthesis, each pistil was 
treated with candidate pollen fi-om 
a particular cultivar. Each pistil 
received the foreign pollen and may 
have received some self pollen fi"om 
the same flower, since the anthers, 
when agitated, shed pollen in the 
immediate vicinity of the receptive 
stigma. All flowers on the cuttings 
were pollinated. Fruit set percen- 
tages were determined 60 days after 
the last flower was pollinated in 
each of the trials. 



There were no differences in fruit 
set that could be related to pollen 
source in either trial; therefore, the 
data were combined (Table 2). The 
average fruit set percentage for all 
self-pollinations was 79% and for 
all cross pollinations was 81%. The 
data offer no evidence that cross 
pollination among these 7 culti- 
vars is beneficial to fruit set. When 
pollinated under greenhouse con- 
ditions, the flower will set and 
mature a fruit independent of pollen 
source. 

Fruit set determinations were 
made on samples of fruiting 
uprights taken from a field in which 
6 cultivars are planted in a strip 
arrangement within 1 flooding sec- 
tion. The field is 16 m x 247 m with 
'Berlin,' 'Mammoth,' 'Howes,' 
'McFarlin' and 'Vose's Pride' in 16 
m X 33 m blocks and 'Searles' on a 
16 m X 82 m block. Cultivar blocks 
are separated by a .05 m wide vege- 
tation free path. Five samples of 
about 50 fruiting uprights each were 
harvested from randomly nomi- 
nated points on transect lines situ- 



Table 1. Numbers of seeds per fruit from several pollen sources on 
'Stevens' cranberry pistils. 



Percentage of fruit with 

Pollen donor No. of seed number in class Range of Mean 

cultivar fruit 1-10 11-20 21-30 31-40 seed no. seed no. 



Ben Lear 61 3A 39 23 3 3-39 

Searles 62 48 35 11 5 2-32 

Crowley 39 A4 38 18 2-29 

McFarlin 65 34 40 20 6 1-36 

Stevens (self) 70 41 50 8 1-27 

Average 59 40 40 16 3 



14 
11 
12 
15 
12 
13 



S* 'I'^-f 



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CRANBERRIES June 1989 Page 11 



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Call us today for the dealer nearest you, or contact: 



Skip Tenpas 

Central Sands Irr. & BIdg., Inc. 

Hwy 51 & 73 Interchange 

Plainfleld, Wl 54966 

(715)335-6372 



Bruce Sunnerberg 

AAA Industrial Pump & Ser., Inc. 

66 Lake Street 

Plympton, MA 02367 

(617) 585-2394 



NOTICE 

Selected exclusive 
dealer territories 
still available — 

Inquiries invited 



Page 12 CRANBERRIES June 1989 



ated 1.5 m and 12 m from the junc- 



each sample and the fruit set per- 



remains on the plant as an aborted 

^^M^—-.^— - -I >roduction 

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^^ cranberry crop without the threat of fruit 
' rot diseases. 

That's why cranberry growers are turning to 
a better way to control fruit rot. Bravo 720. 

Bravo deHvers consistent, first-rate control 
of all the major fruit rot diseases that threaten 
cranberries. Plus leaf and twig blight 
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And that's backed by results of eight years 
of testing which show that Bravo 720 is more 
effective on fruit rot diseases than all other 
fungicides. 

What's more, Bravo won't adversely affect 
fruit color. Or leave any lingering odor after 
application. 

And remember, you can apply Bravo with con- 
ventional spray equipment or through sprinkler 
irrigation. The advanced flowable formulation 
of Bravo 720 is easy to handle, easy to mix. 

So, this season, use Bravo 720 to protect your 
cranberry crop from fruit rot diseases. Just make 
your first spray at early bloom and stick to a 
regular 10- to 14-day schedule. 

End the threat of these fruit rot diseases and 
bring in a bigger yield come harvest. 

Bravo. Because you give it all you've got. 

Fermenta Plant Protection Company, 
5966 Heisley Road, P.O. Box 8000, 
Mentor, OH 44061-8000. 



Bravd 720. 



ielf 

85 
68 

50 
68 

43 
70 

28 
71 

5A 
93 

83 
78 

78 
85 





Bravo 720 


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Page 13 



_ 



c< 



L 



Page 11 



ated 1.5 m and 12 m from the junc- 
tures between 2 cultivars. All 
pedicels and fruits were counted for 



each sample and the fruit set per- 
centage calculated. In the cranberry 
a flower that does not form a fruit 



remains on the plant as an aborted 
flower and thus flower production 
can be readily determined many 



Table 2. Effect of pollsource on fruit set percentage for several cranberry cultivars. Data from two 
trials were combined. 

















Poll 


en cultlvar 










Seed 


Ben 
















Mean of 




Cultlvar 




Lear 


Bennett 


Searles 


Gebhar 


dt 


Crowley 


Stevens 


McFarlln 


crosses 


Self 


Ben Leaf 


Flow. 


no. 




63 


63 


65 




59 


42 


75 


61 


85 




% set 






58 


70 


86 




71 


59 


80 


73 


68 


Bennett 


Flow. 


no. 


33 




36 


17 




45 


34 


42 


35 


50 




% set 




88 




81 


76 




58 


94 


64 


75 


68 


Searles 


Flow. 


no. 


9 


19 




8 




k% 


39 


50 


29 


43 




% set 




78 


63 




38 




81 


87 


80 


78 


70 


Gebhardt 


Flow. 


no. 


hi 


55 


66 






49 


63 


22 


50 


28 




% set 




81 


80 


83 






80 


89 


91 


84 


71 


Crowley 


Flow. 


no. 


61 


62 


55 


50 






43 


47 


53 


54 




% set 




82 


85 


85 


88 






84 


91 


86 


93 


Stevens 


Flow. 


no. 


78 


60 


67 


41 




74 




79 


67 


83 




% set 




83 


77 


83 


73 




76 




67 


77 


78 


McFarlln 


Flow. 


no. 


89 


63 


66 


93 




87 


71 




78 


78 




% set 




92 


94 


94 


95 




92 


94 




93 


85 



Average set of all self pollination - 79%. 
Average of all cross pollination - 81%. 




p 



Ag S 



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Inc. 




* Complete line of cranberry herbicides, fertilizers, insecticides, fungicides, 
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* Right to know training. 

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* Sanding by helicopter. 



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William D. Chamberlain 

461 Mary's Pond Rd. 
Rochester, MA 02770 

Office: 295-2731 
Evening: 763-8956 
Fax:(508)291-1417 



Serving Massachusetts Cranberry Growers 



1 



CRANBERRIES June 1989 Page 13 



Table 3. Percentage fruit set on samples taken from 6 cultivars in one 
flooding section. Flowers were all free to self -pollinate 
with different potentials for cross-pollination. 







Distance to 
















Nearest 


cross 




Fruit 


set p 


erce 


ntage 




Receptor 


cross pollen 
source 


pollen 
(meters) 






sample 


no . 






cultivar 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


ave . 


Berlin 


Mammoth 


12 


64 


65 


84 


58 


65 


66 


Berlin 


Mammoth 


1.5 


80 


72 


62 


74 


64 


69 


Mammoth 


Berlin 


1.5 


55 


51 


50 


53 


48 


51 


Mammoth 


Berlin 


12 


51 


55 


58 


57 


52 


55 


Mammoth 


Howes 


12 


58 


81 


66 


48 


53 


60 


Mammoth 


Howes 


1.5 


51 


55 


57 


50 


53 


53 


Howes 


Mammoth 


1.5 


59 


58 


64 


54 


48 


56 


Howes 


Mammoth 


12 


60 


76 


61 


65 


60 


65 


Howes 


McFarlin 


12 


51 


48 


52 


59 


52 


52 


Howes 


McFarlin 


1.5 


59 


65 


62 


63 


60 


61 


McFarlin 


Howes 


1.5 


57 


52 


59 


59 


63 


58 


McFarlin 


Howes 


12 


55 


53 


61 


64 


45 


55 


McFarlin 


Searles 


12 


52 


57 


64 


50 


46 


53 


McFarlin 


Searles 


1.5 


62 


60 


61 


53 


57 


58 


Searles 


McFarlin 


1.5 


60 


61 


71 


56 


60 


62 


Searles 


McFarlin 


12 


56 


59 


63 


58 


55 


58 


Searles 


Vose's Pride 


12 


63 


63 


59 


64 


60 


61 


Searles 


Vose's Pride 


1.5 


72 


71 


75 


67 


64 


70 


Vose's Pride 


Searles 


1.5 


53 


61 


52 


61 


55 


56 


Vose's Pride 


Searles 


12 


53 


60 


66 


56 


48 


56 



I 



months after the petals have fallen. 

The fruit set percentages from 
100 field samples are shown in 
Table 3. There is no evidence that 
proximity of a cultivar to a source 
of cross pollen influenced fruit set 
percentage. 

Greenhouse and field data show 
no benefit to fruit set percentage 
from several cross pollen sources. 
Benefits to yield will come from 
improved pollination, not from more 
cross pollination. 



Literature Cited 

1. Bain, H.F. 1933. Cross pollinating 
cranberry. Ann. Rpt. Wis. State 
Cranb. Grow. Assn. 47:7-11. 

2. Filmer, R.S., P. Marucci, and H. 
Moulter. 1958. Seed counts and size 
of cranberries. Proc. Amer. Cranb. 
Grow. Assoc. 88:22,26-30. 

3. Hall, I.V. and L. E. Aalders. 1965. 
The relation bet'ween seed number 
and berry weight in the cranberry. 

Page 14 CRANBERRIES June 1989 



Can. J. Plant Sci. 45:292. 
Marucci, P.E. 1966. Cranberry polli- 
nation. Cranberries 30(9): 11-13. 
, Marucci, P.E. and R.S. Filmer. 1964. 
Preliminary cross pollination tests 
on cranberries. Proc. Amer. Cranb. 
Grow. Assoc. 91-94:48-51. 



Rigby, Bruce and M.N. Dana. 1971 
Seed number and berry volume in 
cranberry. HortScience 6:495-496. 



'Professor and graduate assistants. Present addresses: Ms. 
Steinmann. Box 185, Bareveld, Wl 53507. 



If 



Si 



WISCONSIN CRANBERRY 
HEADQUARTERS FOR 

XCOLE 

SEVINXLR 

DEVRINOL 10G « EVITAL • GUTHION 
DIAZINON 14G ♦ PARATHION • ETHREL 

Cole/Grow^er Service 

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(608) 221-6204 or 1-800-362-8049 



k 

I 

ill! 



Ocean Spray, 
Decas Firm 
Reach a 
Settlement 

A bloody, protracted, expensive 
court battle was averted recently 
when Ocean Spray and the Decas 
Cranberry Co. of Wareham, Mass., 
reached a settlement in the antitrust 
suit brought by Decas more than a 
year ago. 

Specific terms of the settlement 
were not released but it was dis- 
closed that Ocean Spray will supply 
Decas with unspecified quantities 
of berries for juice and other pro- 
ducts for up to 12 years. 

Both sides agreed not to com- 
ment on any details beyond what 
was included in a general press 
release. 

Robert St. Jacques, chairman of 
the board of directors of Ocean 
Spray, said, "We are pleased with 
the settlement." 

The suit was filed in federal court 
in Boston. 

Besides the supply of cranber- 
ries, Ocean Spray agreed to pro- 
vide Decas with new technology 
for processing the fruit. The exact 
nature of the technology was not 
disclosed. 

Regarding the supply of berries 
over 12 years, one medium sized 
Ocean Spray grower, who declined 
to speak for the record, quipped, 
"Does this mean in 12 years' time 
Ocean Spray will have to subsidize 
Decas again?" 

Ocean Spray's 
Name Brought 
Into Wright 
Investigation 

Ocean Spray became one of many 
companies and individuals whose 
names have been dragged into the 
House ethics committee's inquiry 
into the conduct of House Speaker 



Jim Wright, CRANBERRIES has 
learned. 

According to documents compiled 
by the committee, formally known 
as the House Committee on Stand- 
ards of Official Conduct, Ocean 
Spray was among the companies 
which purchased copies of Wright's 
book, "Reflections of a Public Man," 
in lieu of honoraria payments for 
speeches delivered by the Texas 
congressman. 

Wright has been accused of 
seeking royalty fees for the books 



instead of the usual honoria 
payments in order to evade House 
rules on income disclosure. 

Wrote Bob Mitchell of The 
(Wisconsin Rapids, Wise.) Daily 
Tribune Washington Bureau in an 
April 18 report: "Neither Ocean 
Spray nor Edward Cassidy, the 
Washington lobbyist who acted as 
Ocean Spray's intermediary in 
dealings with Wright, were aware 
of any impropriety in the book pur- 
chase, Cassidy spokesman Roy 
Meyers said...." 



Equipment Inc. 



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381 West Grove Street (Rte. 28) 
Middleboro, MA 02346 



Tractors 2 & 4 wheel drive — 12-90 hp. 

Compact Excavators 1 V? to 6 ton 

Wheel Leaders '/? to ^U yd. 

Water Cooled Diesel Engines 4 to 104 hp. 

AW Types of Implements 

Polymark Beaver-Mowers 947-6299 

Specialty Fabrication Work 

Kubota Financing as Low as fi'/?% 

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for your material. 



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Carver, Mass. 
(508) 866-5285 



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(508) 359-7291 



CRANBERRIES June 1989 Page 15 



LIFT PUMPS 

Trailer or Permanent 

Electric, Tractor or 

Engine Driven 

PHIL HELMER 
(715)421-0917 



OCEAN SPRAY FILM 
RECEIVES AN AWARD 

Ocean Spray recently received the More 
Than Two Million film and video award 
from Modern Talking Picture Service for its 
educational film, "Where the Cranberries 
Grow." 

The award is in recognition of the film 
having been seen by more than 2 million 
students in schools throughout the country. 



Herbert "Skip" Colcord, manager of con- 
sumer afairs for Ocean Spray, was the exec- 
utive director of the original film project. He J 
accepted a special plaque from Ken Fry,] 
account executive of Modem, at a presenta- 
tion at Ocean Spray headquarters in 
Plymouth. 




CONSULTING ENGINEERS 
SURVEYORS 



Extensive experience in all aspects of cranberry 
land development: evaluation, purchase, survey, 
design, permit acquisition, phased construction and 
planting both in wetlands and uplands. 

Have references. Will travel. 

Contact: Will Lee 

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Wisconsin Rapids, Wl 54494 

(715)424-3131 



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Page 16 CRANBERRIES June 1989 



r*), 



R 



E C I N A L 
NOTES 

MASSACHUSETTS 



By IRVING E. DEMORANVILLE 

As of April 1 , there were 2 points of a possi- 
ble 10 ttiat favored keeping quality in the 1989 
Massachusetts crop. 

The forecast was for poor keeping quality. 
This was a good year to consider holding late 
water on some acreage for quality control. 
Early water bogs should have had fungicide 
treatment applied at the proper time. 

Our present cultural practices tend toward 
a more concentrated growth of vines, which 
favors fungi buildup and infection. Fungicide 
treatments are always a good investment. 



WASHINGTON 

By EDITH A. SHIRE 

Dr. Carl H. Shanks Jr., superintendent and 
entomologist at the Washington State Uni- 
wersity/Vancouver Research & Extension Unit, 
nas assumed thedutiesof interim manager of 
Ihe Long Beach Research & Extension Unit 
jntil a replacement is found for the retired 
\zmi Y. Shawa. 



March 28 marked the start of Washington 
State University's centennial celebration. 

Inobservanceof the event, the Long Beach 
Research & Extension Unit held an open 
house. On display was an antique courting 
buggy built in the late 1800's, which was 
shipped aboard the British registered stea- 
mer, "Bawnmore," out of Canada and bound 
for Peru. The ship foundered in heavy seas 
and fog approximately 13 miles south of Ban- 
don, Ore., on Aug. 13, 1895. 

Only three items, the buggy, built by the 
Lewis and Stover Co. of Portland, Ore., a 
grand piano and a well bred red bull, which 
swam to shore, were ever recovered from the 
ship's wreckage. The grand piano is now on 
display in an Oregon museum and the red 
bull's descendants graze the hillside pastures 
of the south coast. 

The Beach Bandits 4-H Club of the Penin- 
sula featured a display of horse and harness 
items from the early 1900's. The WSU coop- 
erative extension's Master Gardeners also 
took part in the open house. 

WISCONSIN 

Ron Arendt, a part-time beekeeper from 
Nekoosa, spoke to Sacred Heart pupils about 
his hobby. Among the facts he cited was an 
estimate that bee pollination contributes $20 
billion annually to the agricultural economy. 




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Cranberry Display Wins Prize 
At Horticuiture Society Siiow 



The Cape Cod Cranberry 
Growers' Association produced an 
award winning exhibit at the recent 
New England Flower Show put on 
by the Massachusetts Horticulture 
Society. 

The exhibit, "Cranberry Growing: 
Creating and Protecting Wetlands," 
captured two blue ribbons and two 
medals, along with the rapt atten- 
tion of 180,000 people thankful for 
signs of spring. 

The many details of cranberry 
culture on display included a bog in 
partial bloom, with its reservoir, a 
beehive and wetlands. Native spe- 
cies forced into full bloom added to 
an environmentally positive image. 

The display earned a silver medal 
for its high quality plant material, 
including northern pitcher plants 
in full bloom, checker berries, wil- 
low, bayberry, lady slippers, blue- 
berries and lichen. 

The exhibit was designed by Jack 
and Dot Angley, Dawn Swanberg 
and Linda Everett. Ray Mello pro- 
vided equipment and manpower, 
Chris Geldmacher engineered the 
water containment sections. Plant 
material was developed by Linda 
Kunhart, with Peter and Douglas 



Beaton. 

Teams of CCCGA members 
manned the exhibit and answered 
questions during the 10 days of the 
flower show. Two of the most often 
asked questions were, "Why do you 
flood the cranberry bogs?," and, 
"Do cranberries grow in fresh or 
salt water?" 



In another recent promotional 
event, the Cranberry Connection 
donated 50 copies of the Crimson 
Harvest video to Plymouth County 
schools. The cranberry growing 
documentary was produced by th( 
CCCGA as part of its 100th anni 
versary celebration. 

— Carolyn Gilmore 



Financial Strength. . . 

Personalized Service. 

Isn't That What You Need In A Bank? 



> 



The Jackson County Bank 
has supported agriculture in the 
area tor more than 110 years. 

We recognize the importance 
ot the cranberry industry and are 
pleased to provide financial ser- 
vices for all your banking needs. 



We're large enough to serve 
you and yet we offer personal- 
ized service which your busi- 
ness demands. Call us at 715- 
284-5341 

The Jackson County Bank. A 
name to count on throughout 
the years. 



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PORTABLE MICROSCOPES 

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examination of plants in the field for: 

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Page 18 CRANBERRIES June 1989 




CREATORS of the prizewinning exhibit were, 1. to r., Dot and Jack 
Angley, Dawn Swanberg and Linda Everett. 




f ACK ANGLEY raises the plank which activated the water pump 
hat transferred w^ater from the miniature sw^amp to the miniature 
•ogs. Looking on is Peter Beaton, w^ho helped with the plant 
naterial for the project. 

(CRANBERRIES photo by Linda Everett) 




Weather 



MASSACHUSETTS 

March was on the cool side, averaging 0.8 
degrees a day below normal — the coolest 
since 1984. Maximum temperature was 59 
degreeson the 26th and minimum 1 1 degrees 
on the 7th. The month was very cold for the 
first two weeks and warmer than normal for 
two short periods during the middle and near 
the end. 

Precipitation totaled 4.17 inches, or about 
2/3 inch below normal. There was measura- 
ble precipitation on nine days, with 1 .60 inch 
on the 24th and 25th as the greatest storm. We 
are 3'/2 inches below normal for the first three 
months of 1989 and about 4'/4 inches behind 
1988. 

I.E.D. 



CRANLAND 
SERVICES 

Cranberry Property 
Appraisals 

*••••• 

Listings and Sales of 

Cranberry Properties. 

License # 68987 



Lawrence W. Pink 

Old Cordwood Path 

Duxbury, MA 02332 

(617)934-6076 



Pump Repairs 
& S»ales 

All Types 

• Field Service 

• Chemigation Equipment 
Soid 

• Demonstration by 
Appointment 

AAA Industrial 
Pump Service Inc. 

Bruce Sunnerberg 

66 Lake Street 

Plympton, MA 02367 

(617)585-2394 



CRANBERRIES June 1989 Page 19 



ra Gapen 

^^^ Realty 



Cranberry Marsh 

FOR SALE 

*6 acres planted, 'l? acres ready 

to be planted '3 homes 

$175,000 

Washburn County. WI 

2141 8th street South 
Wisconsin Rapids. Wisconsin 54494 

(715)423-6550 



Wanted 

Wisconsin Cranberry 
Grower wishes to purchase 
an existing cranberry marsh. 

STEVE 

(715)421-0917 
(715)593-2385 




Krause Excavating. Inc 



Canal work 

Pond Construction 



Ditching 
Land Gearing 



1-1/4-3 yd. draglines with 80' boom and matts, 2 yd. 
backhoe, swamp dozer and other related equipment. 



Contact: 



Roger Krause 1-414-398-3322 
Route 3 Markesan, wis. 53946 



Irrigation Equipment Designed 
Especially for the Cranberry Industry 



Gorman-Rupp Self Priming 
Electric Sprinkler Pumps 

Proven Quick Couple Riser 



• Butt Fusion Equipment 
Available 

• Paco/Wemco Water Harvest 
Pump 

• Berkeley Self-Priming and 
Centrifugal Pumps 



A Most Complete Inventory of Irrigation Accessories 




Page 20 CRANBERRIES June 1989 



WOLLSCHLAGER EXCAVATING 

Dragline Work — All Kinds 
Also Have Clam & Scalping Buckets 

Route 1 Necedah. uii saeae 

1-608-565-2436 




CORPORATION 

OF NEW ENGLAND 



Industrial Suppliers To The Cranberry Industry 

Chain, Cable and Accessories 

Used for Making Mats 

All Types of Fasteners (BulK & Packaged) 

Hand Tools Pumps 

Power Tools Motors 

Chiemicals Abrasives 

Lubricants Cutting Tools 

Safety Equipment 



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Richards Rd 
Plymouth Industrial Park 



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Plymouth, MA 02360 






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Phone 362-6018 



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INC. 

59 North Main Street 

Middleboro, MA 02346 

(508) 947-0527 



Sound and Objective 

Advice 

Suited to 

Your Needs 



• Tax and Estate Planning 

• Investment & Insurance 

Review 

• Business Continuity 

• Asset Protection 

• Key Employee Retention 

• Business Tax Analysis 



Mr. William H. Bestgen, Jr. 

Chartered Financial Consultant 

Mr. Peter W. Hutehings 

Attorney at Law practicing as 
a Tax Attorney 



Mr. Roger H. Parent, Jr. 

Accountant, Enrolled to Practice 

before the Internal Revenue 

Service 



Call For Your Free Brochure 

(508) 947-0527 



CRANBERRIES June 1989 Page 21 



Census Shows 
Farm Number 
Has Increased 

In Bay State 

Contrary to the steady decline in the 
number of farms nationwide in this 
century, the recent U.S. Census 



Bureau's 1987 agricultural survey 
showed that farms in Massachusetts — 
the leading cranberry producer in the 
country — have actually increased since 
the last census in 1982. 

The 6,216 farms in Massachusetts 
were 15 percent more than in 1982, 
according to the census figures released 
recently. 

When farm size and value of products 
sold is considered, however, it is clear 
that many of the farms are marginal 
and part-time. Fifty two percent of the 
farms contain 1 to 49 acres. The value 



of products was imder $10,000 for almost 
60 percent of the farms. 

Some 42 percent of the farms had 
1987 sales of $10,000 or more and 12 
percent had sales of $100,000 or more. 

EUGENE LOPES DIES AT 51 

Eugene P. Lopes, 51, of Boston, Mass., 
who worked in southeastem Massachusetts 
cranberry bogs, died March 4 at Boston City 
Hospital after a long illness. He was born in 
Hanson, Mass., son of the late Manuel and 
Dominga (Spinola) Lopes. 



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Brancti Offices 

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Cranberry Plaza, East Wareham • Carver Square, Carver • Trucchi's Plaza, Taunton 

Telephone all offices 947-1313 



Page 22 CRANBERRIES June 1989 



BOG BOOM 



To harvest your cranberries with less labor and more efficiency. 
Containment Systems offers our new BOG BOOM. 



BOG BOOM 



CRANBERRY HARVESTING FLOA TING BOOM 



HEAVY VINYL COATED 
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BALLAST CHAIN POCKET 



ALUMINUM QUICK TYPE 
END CONNECTORS 



4" DEEP VINYL COATED 
FABRIC SKIRT 



Bog boom is tough, with a shorter skirt designed for the shallower bogs. The 
solid PVC skirt improves the strength and durability of our boom. 

Bog Boom is manufactured in 50 foot and 1 00 foot lengths. Multiple lengths 
can be connected together without tools. 

Accessories available - Tow Bridle assemblies and fabric repair kits. 




CONTAINfTlENT 5Y5TErTb 

P.O. Box 1390 COCOA, FLORIDA 32923 
(407) 632-5640 



CRANBERRIES June 1989 Page 23 



Take Good 

Care of Yourself 

Have an Ocean Spray! 




The farmer's cooperative that brings you 
a wide range of natural fruit juices, drinks and sauces 

Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc., Plymouth, Massachusetts 02360 
An Equal Opportunity Employer 



n 




CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

July 1989 Vol. 53, No. 7 



3= r 






73 




Best Grower Awards 
Potassium Analysis 
Blueberry 






£00 TO yw 

isyBHwy 

idBQ siyiyas 

lUMIjaT-! C^CI-JIJ _in AT Kin 



' 




SPARGANOTHIS 
FRUITWORM—A most 
destructive insect, for there 
are two generations. The 
first generation feeds on 
foliage and blossoms and 
the second generation has 
an enormous capacity for 
eating and mining the 
berries. 



• • • • 



Know the Insects . 

The major cranberry insects: cranberry girdler, the fire worms, 
tipworm, blossom worm, cranberry fruitworm and Sparganothis 
fruitworm. 



Know the Insects 

The periodic cranberry insects: cranberry scale, fire beetle, 
blossom weevil, armyworm and bluntnose leafhopper. 

Know the Insects 

Color photographs of all these insects and more are now 
arranged with text in a portfolio that is available. 

The portfolio endeavors to bring together the words of research 
complementing the photographs and making a summary of 
cranberry insect information that will be of use to the cranberry 
grower for a lifetime. 

The portfolio is available for $100 and, if you wish to examine a 
copy, telephone (609) 894-8556 evenings around 6 p.m. or write to: 

Walter Z. Fort 

P.O. Box 183 

Pemberton, NJ 08068 



( 



Page 2 CRANBERRIES July 1989 



Ocean Spray Honors 
Bay State Growers 



By CAROLYN GILMORE 

At a recent Massachusetts grow- 
ers' dinner, Ocean Spray presented 
two awards for excellence in 1988 
crops. 

David Melville received the 
processed fruit grower award for 
his high quality, wet harvested crop. 
Lawrence and Paul Harju received 
the 1988 fresh fruit award. The 
three recipients have their bogs in 
Middleboro. 

The selections were based on a 
number of criteria developed by a 
committee of growers in coopera- 
tion with Ocean Spray manage- 
ment. The committee was chaired 
by Jim Jenkins. 

For each category, participating 
growers received points that were 
tallied by computer. The awards 
went to growers with the highest 
total score. 

The processed fruit award earned 
by Melville was determined by the 
following characteristics: lowest 
average trash, highest anthocynin, 
best quality and highest usable 
fruit, number of barrels per acre 
and overall bog management 
practices. 

The major determinant for the 
fresh fruit award earned by the 
Harju brothers was quality in stor- 
age after three weeks. Crops also 
were graded on quality at delivery, 
consistent quality of past crops. 



COVER PHOTO 

WINNERS: David Melville, 
named Massacusetts Processed 
Fruit Grower of 1988 by Ocean 
Spray, and Mrs. Melville pose 
at their prizewinning bog. 
Lawrence and Paul Harju 
received the 1988 Fresh Fruit 
Award. A story about the con- 
test appears on this page. 
(CRANBERRIES photo by 
Carolyn Gilmore) 




LARRY HARJU, right, of Middleboro, Mass., listens as Jim Jenkins, 
chairman of the Massachusetts Ocean Spray Cranberry Advisory 
Committee, reads a certificate naming Larry, and his brother, 
Paul, Massachusetts Growers of the Year for Fresh Fruit. 



number of years of continuous fresh 
fruit growing, and overall growing 
practices. 

The Harju bog has been dry 
harvested since 1910. The Harjus 
use a modified Furford dry picker 
that is gentle on berries. 

Jenkins noted that the awards 
will be given annually and that 



winners will be eligible to compete 
again. 

Larry Harju recently was voted a 
director on the board of Ocean Spray 
Cranberries. 

Melville's daughter, Lynn, 
accepted the award for her father. 

Close to 500 growers attended 

(please turn the page) 



[yo6^ 



VOLM BAG COMPANY, INC. 



BAG COMPANY^ 

INC. _,y 1804 EDISON ST. BOX B, ANTIGO, WIS. 54409-0116 
PHONE 715/627-4826 

SUPPLYING AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS 

BRAVO - SEVIN - FUNGINEX - ORTHENE 
CASORON - GUTHION - DEVRINOL - PARATHION 

AND 

DELIVERING A COMPLETE LINE OF FERTILIZER 
WITH FAST FRIENDLY SERVICE!!! 



CRANBERRIES July 1989 Page 3 



a Massachusetts Grower of the Year 
Award," said Jenkins. "We wanted 
to start a program this year to rec- 
ognize those growers who bring in 
the best quaUty fruit each season 
and to encourage each other to 
grow better fruit." 



the ceremony. 

Winners were selected from six 
growing areas: Cape Cod, Middle- 
boro. Carver, Plymouth, Wareham 
and Duxbury. A grower from each 
area served on the awards 
committee. 

"This is the first time we've given 

assistant professor has published 
extensively. 



The winners received a certifi- 
cate and a "Massachusetts Grower 
of the Year" sign to put in their 
bogs. Their names will be placed on 
a plaque that will hang in the lobby 
of Ocean Spray's headquarters in 
Lakeville-Middleboro. 




NEW FACE at the Massachusetts Cranberry Experiment Station 
belongs to Dr. Anne Averill. 

(CRANBERRIES photo by Carolyn Gilmore) 

Entomologist Joins 
Experiment Station 



By CAROLYN GILMORE 

Dr. Anne Averill, assistant pro- 
fessor at the University of Massa- 
chusetts Department of Entomol- 
ogy, has been assigned to small 
fruit extension at the Cranberry 
Experiment Station in East 
Wareham. 

She and Dr. Frank Caruso of the 
station will lead the university's 
integrated pest management (IPM) 
program in cranberries. 

Some of the projects Dr. Averill 
will be involved with include pesti- 
cide effectiveness, timing and 
alternatives for tipworm control; 
four different strains of nematodes 
to control white grub; pheromone 
disruption experiment for sparga- 
nothis fruitworm. 
Page 4 CRANBERRIES July 1989 



An opening for IPM coordinator 
is expected to be filled in early 1990. 

"IPM is an important program 
but I believe what is most impor- 
tant is baseline data on insects," 
Dr. Averill said. 

Growers are particularly inter- 
ested in tipworm research at this 
time, she noted. 

Dr. Averill is a 1976 graduate of 
Smith College with a degree in 
biology. She received her Ph.D. in 
insect behavior and ecology from 
the University of Massachusetts in 
1982. 

She also earned a post doctoral 
degree in chemical ecology of insects 
and influences on insect manage- 
ment from Cornell University. 

The University of Massachusetts 



c^^^^F^^F 




COMPUTER, INC. 
CRANWARE 

• Growers 

• Handlers 

• Chemical Applications 

• Chemical Resale 

(508) 747-3033 

P.O. Box 1037, Plymouth, MA 02360 



CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

SEND CORRESPONDENCE TO: 

P.O. BOX 249 

COBALT CT 06414 

(203) 342-4730 

Fax #: (203) 342-1977 

PUBLISHER a EDITOR: BOB TAYLOR 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: CAROLYN GILMORE 
(508) 763-5206 

ADVISORS & CORRESPONDENTS 

MASSACHUSETTS — Irving E Demoranvillf 
Director, Cranberry Experiment Station 

NEW JERSEY— Ptiillip E Marucci. Cranberry & Blueberit 
Specialist. Buddtown. Elizabeth G Carpenter, Chatswortl" 

NOVA SCOTIA — Robert A Murray, Horticulturist, Ben 
Crops, Researcti Station. Truro 

OREGON — Arthur Poole, Coos County Extension Agen 
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WASHINGTON — Azmi Y Shawa. Horticulturist ar 
retired Director, Coastal Washington Researcti & Extensic 
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WISCONSIN — Tod D Planer, Farm ManagennentAgerl 
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JEFFREY CARLSON is the new executive director of the 
Cape Cod Cranberry Growers' Association. 

(CRANBERRIES photo by Carolyn Gilmore) 

New CCCGA Director 
Puts Stress on Action 



By CAROLYN GILMORE 

Jeffrey Carlson, the recently 
appointed executive director of the 
Cape Cod Cranberry Growers' 
Association, would like to see 
growers develop a "proactive stra- 
tegy" that will insure a healthy 
agricultural economy. 

"We have a real opportunity to 
take more control of the future and 
to be part of the process rather than 
waiting for regulations to be drafted 
Page 6 CRANBERRIES July 1989 



and reacting to them," he said. 

Carlson replaces Dr. Dwight 
Peavey, who served for a year. 
Peavey's contract was not renewed. 

The CCCGA is seeking an execu- 
tive secretary and office space 
independent of the Massachusetts 
Cranberry Experiment Station. 

Carlson previously served as chief 
of the Massachusetts Department 
of Food and Agriculture's Pesticide 
Bureau for five years. He repre- 



sented the department on the state's 
Water Resources Commission and 
also served on the federal advisory 
committee to the Environmental 
Protection Agency on issues deal- 
ing with pesticide disposal and 
groundwater. 

The new CCCGA executive 
director earned a degree in envir- 
onmental engineering from the 
University of Massachusetts in 
1976. 

He will be retained as a consul- 
tant to Ocean Spray Cranberries 
from time to time. 



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CRANBERRIES July 1989 Page 7 



Critical Concentration of Potassium in 'Stevens' Cranberry 



MALCOLM N. DANA and SUE STEINMANN^ 
Department of Horticulture, University of Wisconsin/Madison 
Abstract. Cranberry, Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait., cuttings were grown 
in solutions with graduated levels of potassium and adequacy levels of 
other mineral elements. Vegetative growth (dry weight) was not restricted 
in shoots with foliar K level above 0.26% dry weight. Levels of K in the tissue 
ranged from 0.21% to 0.85%. Cuttings without added K in the solution died 
after 16 weeks of continuous growth. 



Foliar analysis offers a poten- 
tially convenient method for 
measuring the nutrient status of 
cranberry plants. Interpretation of 
foliar analysis data requires the 
use for comparison purposes of 
previously established standards 
or critical levels for each element. 
Foliar levels of K found in the field 
have been reported by several 
workers as follows: 0.19-0.83% in 
British Columbia (4) on a young 
planting; 0.50-0.54% in Nova Sco- 
tia (7); 0.38-0.73% in Nova Scotia 
(8); 0.23-0.37% in British Columbia 
(5) on a mature planting; 0.4-0.6% 
in Oregon (1); and 0.6-1. 25% in Wis- 
consin (3). Symptoms of deficiency 
were not reported for any of the 
sample areas for which shoots were 
taken for analyses. One report (6) 



suggested that the critical concen- 
tration is below 0.34% while another 
(2) suggests optimum levels at 0.50- 
0.90%. Both reports were based on 
analyses of field grown cranberry 
plants. No visual evidence of defi- 
ciency symptoms were evident. 

Dormant cuttings of 'Stevens' 
cranberries were taken from the 
field in early spring and rooted in 
aerated distilled water. Two liter 
black plastic pots fitted with 2 cm. 
thick styrofoam covers with 8 holes 
for holding 1 cranberry cutting each 
were used. Cuttings 10 cm. long 
were set with 4 cm. in the solution. 
Upon initiation of rooting and 
emergence of the first shoots on the 
cuttings the distilled water was 
replaced with solutions of mineral 



nutrients. 

The nutrient solution at the start 
of each cycle contained 100 ppm 
NH4-N and 49-61 ppm N03-N, 30 
ppm P, 48 ppm Mg, 70 ppm Ca, 76 
ppm S, .27 ppm each of B and Mn, 
.13 ppm Zn, .03 ppm Cu, .01 ppm 
Mo, 4.0 ppm Fe in equal concentra- 
tions from Fe So4 and Fe EDTA. 
Potassium concentrations were 
adjusted by additions of K N03, to 



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Table 1. 


Potassium concentration 
cranberry plants grown 


and dry 
in soluti 


matter producti 
on culture. 


on for 


Stevens' 




First cvcle 


Second 


cvcle 


Third 


cvcle 


K supply 
(mg) 


Tissue 

K 

(%) 


Dry 

matter 

(g) 


Tissue 

K 

(%) 




Dry 

matter 

(g) 


Tissue 

K 

(%) 


Dry 
matter 
(g) 





.26a 


1.9a 


.15a 




0.9a 


- 


- 


4 


.32a 


2.1a 


.20ab 




2.6b 


.18a 


2.4a 


8 


.45b 


2.3a 


.26b 




3.3c 


.24bc 


3.5b 


12 


.60c 


2.0a 


.36cd 




3.6cd 


.27bcd 


4.6c 


16 


.57c 


2.7a 


.34c 




4.1de 


.27bcd 


5.6d 


20 


.78d 


2.2a 


.41d 




4.3e 


.30de 


5.6d 


24 


.85d 


2.2a 


.48e 




4.2e 


.34e 


6. 2d 


Mean 


separation 


in columns by 


Duncan' s 


multiple range 


test, 5% level. 



give solutions with 0, 2, 4, 8, 10, and 
12ppm. The 2 Uter containers, there- 
fore, contained 0, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 
and 24 mg K, respectively. Water 
levels were maintained during the 
experiment by additions of distilled 
water. Solution reaction was main- 
tained at pH 4.5 +/- 0.3. All treat- 
ments were replicated 5 times and 
pots were set on the bench in a ran- 
domized block design. 

Plants were grown in a glass- 
house with natural daylight 
extended to an 18 hour photoperiod 
with a combination of fluorescent 
and incandescent lamps. The cut- 
tings were allowed to grow as many 
shoots as would break from buds. 
All cuttings produced at least 1 
shoot and some produced as many 

I as 4. At 58 days after "sticking" all 
shoot growth (leaves and stems) 
was harvested, dried, weighed, and 
analyzed for K concentration. The 
original cutting with the root sys- 
tem was left in place, the nutrient 
■ solutions were all brought back to 
original mineral concentrations and 
the procedure was repeated. At 49 
days all new shoot growth was 
harvested, dried, weighed and ana- 
lyzed for K concentration. The entire 
cycle was completed a third time 
with the final harvest 67 days after 
the second harvest. 



Analysis for K concentration was 
conducted by emission spectroscopy. 
Values were converted to percent 
dry matter for ease of presentation. 

The relationship between K con- 
centration and total shoot growth 
accumulation (dry weight) for each 
of the 3 cycles of the experiment are 
shown in Table 1. In the first cycle 
shoot growth per pot varied from 
1.9 g to 2.3 g and K concentration 
from 0.26% to 0.85%. Shoot growth 
in the mg K supply was from 



redistributed mineral from the leafy 
hardwood cutting. Harvest of the 
shoots at the onset of visual defi- 
ciency symptoms in the control 
plants prevented the separation of 
treatments by growth differences 
(dry weight accumulation). 

The second growth flush from 
the cuttings showed visual sjonp- 
toms of deficiency in the and 4 mg 
K supply treatments before harv- 
est. There was a sharp increase in 
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CRANBERRIES July 1989 Page 9 



growth with increasing K concen- 
tration to a level above 0.26% and 
below .34%. Higher K concentra- 
tions in the tissue were not asso- 
ciated with increased dry matter 
accumulation. 

All cuttings with the supply of 
K failed to renew growth after the 
second cycle. There was a direct 
relation between K concentration 
and growth in the third cycle with 
a restraint of growth in those plants 
with tissue K concentration below 
the 0.27% level with equal growth 
for higher tissue concentrations 
(Table 1). No association between 
growth and changes in concentra- 
tion was found above the 0.27% 
tissue level. Allowing the best 
treatments to accumulate up to 6 
grams of tissue depleted the supply 
of K in the rooting solution and 
inhibited development of higher 
concentration levels in the tissue. 
The shoot growth contained an 
amount of K equivalent to 80% or 
more of the available supply for 
each treatment in each cycle. 

Shoot growth attained a maxi- 
mum with a K concentration of 
0.26%, 0.34% and 0.27% of dry weight 
in the 3 growth cycles. Deficiency 
was shown by visual symptoms at 
tissue K levels of 0.15%, 0.20%, 0.18% 
and 0.24% in this study. The tissues 
sampled in the present study were 
rapidly growing shoots in a green- 
house with high daytime tempera- 
tures and light intensity below that 
outside the greenhouse environ- 
ment. These rapidly growing shoots 
would be roughly parallel in growth 
status to field shoots in late June 
and early July. Several workers (1, 
4, 5, 8) have shown that the concen- 
tration of K found (not required) in 
leaf samples declines seasonally 
from a high in June to a lower 
quantity in September and October. 
The critical level of 0.26'K) proposed 
in this report for rapidly growing 
cranberries may be a slightly higher 
concentration than would be 
necessary for vines that have 
slowed or ceased vegetative growth 
in late summer or fall. 

Literature Cited 

1. Chaplin, M.H. and L.W. Martin. 
1979. Seasonal changes in leaf 
element content of cranberry, 

Page 10 CRANBERRIES July 1989 



Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait. 
Comm. Soil Sci. 10:895-902. 

2. Dana, M.N. 1981. Foliar nutrient 
concentration studies IV. Pro- 
posed standards. Cranberries 
45(10):10-11. 

3. Dana, M.N. 1981. Foliar nutrient 
concentration studies. I. Measured 
concentrations in 80 samples 
from 17 marshes. Cranberries 
45(7):9-10. 

4. Eaton, G.W. 1971. Effects of NPK 
fertilizers on the growth and 
composition of vines in a young 
cranberry bog. J. Amer. Soc. 
Hort. Sci. 96:426-429. 

5. Eaton, G.W. 1971. Effect of N, P 
and K fertilizer applications on 
cranberry leaf nutrient compo- 
sition, fruit color and yield in a 
mature bog. J. Amer. Soc. Hort. 
Sci. 96:430-433. 



6. Eaton, G.W. and C.N. Meehan. 
1973. Effects of nitrogen, phos- 
phorous and potassium fertilizer 
on leaf composition, yield, and 
fruit quality of bearing 'Ben 
Lear' cranberries. J. Amer. Soc. 
Hort. Sci. 98:89-93. 

7. Townsend, L.R. 1969. Leaf com- 
position. In: Growing Cranber- 
ries, Canada Dept. of Ag. Publ. 
1282, p. 16. 

8. Townsend, L.R. and I.V. Hall. 
1971. Nutrient levels in leaf and 
soil samples from three cran- 
berry bogs in the Annapolis Val- 
ley of Nova Scotia. Cranberries 
36(3): 11- 12. 

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CRANBERRIES July 1989 Page 11 



REGIONAL 
NOTES 

MASSACHUSETTS 

By IRVING E. DEMORANVILLE 

Dr. Robert Devlin of the Cranberry Experi- 
ment Station was invited as external exa- 
miner for thesis and final examination of a 
PhD. candidate at the University of Alberta in 
Edmonton, Canada, from April 8-1 1 Bob also 
presented a seminar on herbicides and grow/th 
regulators while on campus. 



hearing. Some herds, he said, number as high 
as 200. 

"In five years we're going to be up to our 
armpits in deer," Lasee said. 

The state senator added that a partial solu- 
tion may be to hike the deer hunting quotas. 

FARMLAND PRICES UP 

Farmland prices rose 6 percent in the year 
ending Feb. 1 compared to those for the 
prior year, according to the U.S. Depart- 



ment of Agriculture. 

The average farmland price was $597 an 
acre. 

Prices rose for the second straight year. 

The new figure was, however, far below 
the peak of $823 per acre in 1982. 

Roger Hexem of the USDA's Economic 
Research Service said predictions are that 
farmland will increase 2 to 4 percent by Feb. 
1 , 1990 but that it is still too early to tell with 
any certainty. 



Marshall Severance of AD. Makepeace 
told a group of environmentalists in Wareham 
recently that the cranberry company takes 
good care of Agawam and Wankinquoah river 
property that it owns. The subject came up 
when some of those present said they would 
like to see local groups taking responsibility 
forWareham's rivers. 

"We're already taking care of them," Sever- 
ance said. "We maintain fish ladders and keep 
them clean. I think we do a good job." 

WISCONSIN 

Wisconsin farmers can expect heavy dam- 
ages this year from deer. Sen. Alan Lasee, De 
Pere Republican, told a recent legislative 



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Blueberries Worldwide 



Editor's Note: Because a sub- 
stantial number of growers 
produce blueberries as well as 
cranberries— particularly in 
New Jersey-CRANBERRIES 
will carry an article on blue- 
berries from time to time. This 
piece first appeared in New 
E!ngland American Agriculturist 
and is reprinted with the kind 
permission of that magazine. 

By MARVIN PRITTS 

Last August I had the privilege 
of attending the International 
Symposium on Vaccinium Culture 
held in Madison, Wisconsin. This 
conference was attended by blue- 
berry and cranberry researchers from 
throughout the world, and many 
of the discussions and field visits 
had implications for blueberry 
growers in the Northeast. 

Blueberry acreage is expanding 
rapidly throughout the United 
States and the rest of the world. 
Acreage has nearly doubled in 
Michigan since 1966, making it the 
largest producer of blueberries in 
the country with 15,000 acres. More 
than 2,500 acres have been planted 
in the foothills of the Ozark Moun- 
tains where none existed 20 years 
ago. Florida and Texas growers are 

DECAS OBJECTS TO 
REMARK BY GROWER 

John C. Decas of the Decas Cranberry Co. 
took strong exception to a query posed by an 
Ocean Spray grower that was published in 
the June 1989 CRANBERRIES. 

Following news of the settlement of a suit 
brought by Decas against Ocean Spray, in 
which the cooperative agreed to supply 
independent Decas with berries for 12 years, 
the grower, who spoke off the record, asked, 
"Does this mean in 12 years' time Ocean 
Spray will have to subsidize Decas again?" 

Decas said he was outraged by the remark. 

"We've always stood on our own two feet 
and we don't need Ocean Spray or anybody 
else to give us a hand," Decas asserted. "It is 
our opinion that the settlement was a fair 
and equitable one." 

Ocean Spray spokespersons also said they 
were pleased with the settlement of the anti- 
tru.st suit. 

Decas also was critical of CRANBER- 
RIP^S for not having sought his reaction to 
the grower's remark before the story was 
published. 

Page 14 CRANBERRIES July 1989 



also planting significant acreages 
of blueberries, and the Pacific 
Northwest and North Carolina each 
boast 4,000 acres. 

Closer to home, the Northeast 
contains 3,000 acres of highbrush 
blueberries, with New York reported 
to have 55% of the total. In addition 
to the substantial highbush 
acreage in the Northeast, Maine 
growers manage 46,000 acres of 
lowbush blueberries. The total 
acreage of highbush, rabbiteye and 
lowbush blueberries in North 
America is over 150,000. 

The blueberry plant is native to 
North America, so few people liv- 
ing outside the continent are famil- 
iar with the plant. This situation is 
changing, however — with Germany, 



Poland, Finland, The Netherlands, 
Italy, Bulgaria, Australia, Chile, 
Japan, and Russia beginning fled- 
gling industries. 

What are the implications for the 
northeastern grower in the blue- 
berry business? Fortunately, the 
blueberry fruit is not as perishable 
as other small -fruit crops, so super- 
markets (where people purchase 
80% of their fruit) are more willing 
to buy directly from independent 
growers, rather than from large 
California-type brokers. Blueberries 
will hold for a longer time in stor- 
age, allowing the grower to pick 
under dry conditions and hold the 
fi-uit for a week or more before 
delivery at a specified date. 

Innovative growers should be able 



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^y ^m ^j^ J tlve still makes house calls . . ^ and he's been treating farm 
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Farm families count on him to provide the financial support they need— short- 
term and long-term credit— that helps them plan for a productive future. 

But there's more to Farm Credit than money. What makes your Farm Credit 
representative unique is that he knows your business so well. Which means that 
he's more than a dependable source of credit He can provide farm business 
consulting, tax services, credit life insurance, appraisal service and computer- 
ized record-keeping. 
Give him a call. He could be just what the doctor ordered for you. 

Jk Southern New England 
*^^ Farm Credit Service 




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Production Credit Association 

PC Box? 
Taunton, MA 02780 
508 / 824-7578 




ill 



to use wholesale markets for their 
blueberries, especially as demand 
in other countries increases. For 
example, per capita consumption 
of blueberries in East Germany is 
one ounce, but would be higher if 
fruit was available. The Japanese 
are selling their blueberries in very 
small containers at high prices 
because of the demand. Austral- 
ians pay nearly $3.00 per pound for 
their blueberries. 

The lowbush blueberry acreage 
in the United States is nearly all 
destined for processing. Much of 
the Michigan and New Jersey pro- 
duction is also processed, with this 
year's price for processed fruit 
equivalent to the fresh market price 
because of the drought. The crea- 
tion of many new products con- 
taining blueberries attests to their 
popularity, and should sustain 
demand for processed fruit over the 
next several years. 

Demand for pick-your-own blue- 
berries is also rather strong in the 



United States. Although some 
regions are seeing the effect of 
competition, others are not. Near 
Ottawa, Canada, the pick-your-own 
price for highbush blueberries was 
reported to be $2.25 per pound. 

In the Northeast, prices are 
generally 80 cents per pound, and 
the overall marketing situation is 
favorable. Much of the blueberry 
acreage in New York and other 
states consists of young plantings, 
and is almost exclusively sold for 
the fresh market. Future market- 
ing of fresh blueberries may become 
more difficult as these young 
plantings mature. 

Blueberries will soon be availa- 
ble to consumers year around. In 
Holland, growers are planting 
blueberries in old greenhouses once 
used for flower production, and 
providing bees for flower pollina- 
tion. Harvest is advanced four 
weeks, allowing them to take 
advantage of the early market. 

Australia and Chile are also 



conducting extensive research on 
producing blueberries for sale to 
the United States during winter. 
Florida can already produce for the 
May market. These trends may 
have a positive influence on 
domestic sales if consumers become 
accustomed to using blueberries 



TAUNTON 

4 Pflm Bop 

• 22 Acres 

•Good Water & Soil 

• Dormant - Ready to 

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•Chapter 61 A - Plans 

LEASE OR SALE 
(508) 896-6262 




I 






Cranberry Harvesting Equipment 

Warrens Equipment & Manufacturing Co., Inc. 

Growing cranberries is 
something you as a grower do 
best. Manufacturing of 
harvesting equipment, air 
flow, radar controlled fertilizer 
spreading equipment, and 
flow gates or flumes is 
something we do that can be 
of service to you. 

NEWS FLASHES 

standard WEM Bog-Trac Tractors & Beaters Available For Immediate Shipment 

• Beater reels available, your choice of designs , safety parking brake 

• You as a grower tell us what Is best for your bog • Ground speed and reel speed Indicator 

• Change your reel rpm from bog to bog or variety to variety • Lighter weight 

• Engine horsepower available from 18 h.p. to 48 h.p. 
Be sure to check this new model harvester before you make a purchase for 1989. 




WEM Factory serving Wisconsin, West Coast, British Columbia 

111 Grant St. 
Warrens, Wl 54666 
Tel. (608) 378-4794 
(608) 378-4137 



WEM East Coast 

Steams Irrigation, inc. 

790 Federal Furnace Rd. 

Plymouth, MA 02360 

Tel. (508) 746-6048 



CRANBERRIES July 1989 Page 15 



I 



throughout the year, rather than 
on a seasonal basis. 

I predict that the blueberry 
market will remain strong since 
this crop is rather difficult and 
costly to establish. Dr. Mark Cas- 
taldi, Cornell University economist, 
estimated the net establishment 
costs for blueberries (cumulative 
costs minus revenues through the 
first nine years) at $13,612 per acre. 
This price tag will prevent many 
growers from entering the blue- 
berry business on a large scale. 

Breeding Objectives 

The biggest problem facing 
blueberry growers in other parts of 
the world is lack of adapted culti- 
vars. Bluecrop is probably the most 
widely grown cultivar, but it was 
developed for the New Jersey cli- 
mate. Breeders are currently focus- 
ing on developing improved cul- 
tivars for their regions, and are 
examining hybrids made with other 
species. 

Examples of hybrid blueberries 
are Northland, Patriot, Bluetta, 



Northblue, Northsky and North- 
country. Each has the ancestors 
Vaccinium corymbosum (highbush) 
and V. angustifolium Oowbush), 
and enable growers to plant these 
cultivars in very cold climates. 
Species from locations other than 
North America are being used in 
breeding programs throughout 
Europe and Russia to improve 
adaptability. 

Tropical islands, like New Gui- 
nea, contain more than 100 species 



of Vaccinium. The potential exists 
to develop blueberry-type fruit for 
just about every country in the 
world. 

In New Jersey, breeders are try- 
ing to incorporate drought toler- 
ance and pest resistance into high- 
bush blueberries through crosses 
with the rabbiteye blueberry from 
the southern United States. Flor- 
ida and North Carolina continue to 
develop highbush blueberries which 
require little winter chilling, and 




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Personal attention to your special 

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Cranberry Plaza, East Wareham • Carver Square, Carver • Trucchi's Plaza, Taunton 

Telephone all offices 947-1313 



Page 16 CRANBERRIES July 1989 



produce for the early market. The 
Minnesota program is experiment- 
ing with summer-flowering, fall- 
fruiting blueberries which may 
enable growers to avoid most 
winter-injury problems. Michigan 
is looking for late flowering, yet 
early fruiting types and is examin- 
ing wild selections for desirable 
traits. 

Breeders at the United States 
Department of Agriculture in 
Beltsville, Maryland, also have 
some interesting selections out for 
test. One particular selection has 
flavor equal to Bluecrop, but a much 
more upright growth habit and 
slightly later production period. It 
is possible this selection could be 
released in the next several years. 
These are but a few examples of the 
exciting developments in breeding 
programs throughout the country. 

During one of the tours, we were 
able to examine many blueberry 
cultivars and selections at test 
plantings located in Grand Junc- 
tion, Michigan, home of the Michi- 
gan Blueberry Growers Association. 



Also on the agenda was Tower 
View Nursery, the only nursery in 
the world to virus-test its plant 
material. Many growers starting a 
blueberry operation are interested 
in obtaining virus-free plants to 
avoid roguing diseased plants in 
the future. 

The group visited DeGrand- 
champ's Blueberry Farm which 
employs over 45 workers during 
the summer. They have a 6,000 
cubic foot cooler to precool berries 
before shipping, and a new type of 
irrigation system which uses the 
same lines to irrigate in summer, 
and drain the fields in spring. 

We also had the opportunity to 
visit Jones' Blueberry Ranch in 
Indiana, with 72 acres of immacu- 
late plantings. The manager, John 
Nelson , discussed what he felt were 
the secrets of his success. 

Customers are first greeted in the 
parking lot and asked what type of 
berry they want to pick (pies, freez- 
ing, fresh eating, etc.). Several signs 
in the area list the vitamin, min- 
eral and fiber content of blueber- 



ries. Customers are given a two 
gallon bucket and a ride to the 
appropriate field. (Mr. Nelson found 
that sales increased significantly 
when customers were given a large 
bucket, rather than smaller ones.) 
Little red wagons are also provided 
if a customer plans to harvest a 
large amount of fruit. 
Plantings are in small blocks 



I 



The 

CHARLES W.HARRIS 

Company 

451 Old Somerset Avenue 
North Dighton, Mass. 
Phone (508) 824-5607 

AMES 

Antisyphon Devices 

RAINBIRD 

Sprinklers 

HALE 

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Hlihesf QatlHu Ptoduets 
WlthSsflsftethn iSuamteed 



K Ag Laboratories International, Inc. 

2323 Jackson Street 
Oshkosh, Wl 54901 

* Cranberry Soil Analysis 

* Cranberry Vine Analysis 

* Cranberry Water Analysis, 
Usage & Interpretation 

* Liquid & Dry Fertilizer 
Recommendation 

* Soil Problem,s & Consultation 

* Seminars 

* Cranberry Crop Monitoring 
Program, testing and 
monitoring nutrient status 
with 30 day intervals during 
during the growing season. 



Serving Cranberry 
Growers in U.S.A. 
& Canada since 1984 

Over 20 years 
of Experience on 
Acid Soil Interaction 



K Ag Laboratory has 
run over 30,000 
cranberry soil and over 
17,500 cranberry vines 
tests since 1984, and 
gave fertilizer 
recommendations with 
great success. 



Highly computerized cranberry soil, tissue and water testing program i 
U.S.A. and Canada. 

For more information contact: Dr. Akhtar Khwaja, Ph.D. 

Certified Professional Soil Scientist 
Certified Professional Agronomist 
Phone Number 414-426-2220; Out of Wl 1-800-356-6045; FAX 414-426-2222 




CRANBERRIES July 1989 Page 17 



wdth short rows for both ease of 
walking and improved poUination. 
Bee hives are set between rows of 
different cultivars to ensure cross- 
polUnation. Weeds are practically 
nonexistent since a perennial sod 
is planted in the row middle, and 
young plants are set through plas- 
tic or weed mats. Gramoxone is the 
only herbicide used in young plant- 
ings so phytotoxicity from 
preemergent herbicides is avoided. 
Plants are irrigated through 
September, and the fertilizer pro- 
gram consists of split applications 



of urea and magnesium. Each block 
is given foliar nutrient sprays in 
accordance with a leaf analysis. 

The most important cultural 
practice, according to Mr. Nelson, 
is pruning. He finds that annual 
pruning is a must, and believes this 
separates his operation from many 
other growers who experience low 
yields, late-maturing small berries, 
and diseases. Interestingly, Gary 
Pavlis, blueberry specialist from 
New Jersey, also identifies lack of 
pruning as the most important 
cause of low yields in that state. 



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STEARNS IRRIGATION, INC. 

790 Federal Furnace Rd. 

Plymouth MA 02360 

Tel. (508) 746-6048 




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Used tor Making Mats 

All Types of Fasteners (BuIk & Packaged) 

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PLANNERS, 
INC. 

59 North Main Street 

Middleboro, MA 02346 

(508) 947-0527 



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before the Internal Revenue 

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(508) 947-0527 



Page 18 CRANBERRIES July 1989 



Mr. Nelson has his cash register 
programmed to record variety and 
the check-out time. This allows him 
to plan more effectively. He also 
does all his spraying and running 
of the mechanical harvester at night 
so he can maintain a quiet, tran- 
quil atmosphere at the farm during 
the day. He feels that sounding 
devices for bird control keep away 
many customers as well as birds. 

Research Findings 

The Australians are planting their 
blueberries on ridges to avoid Phy topb- 
tbora root rot. The sides of the ridges 
are covered with landscape mats to 
help with weed control and maintain 
the integrity of the ridge. The top of the 
ridge is mulched with wood chips, but 
contains no landscape mat so new 
canes can grow through. Plants are set 
two feet apart in the row to obtain early 
production. Microjet irrigation is the 
preferred means of applying water. 

The Australians have found that 
windbreaks are very important for 
successful blueberry production. Often 
entire plantings are enclosed in Japa- 
nese fishing nets to exclude birds — at a 
cost of $5,000 per acre. 

Florida researchers have discovered 



a new bee which is an incredibly effi- 
cient pollinator of blueberries. It has a 
long tongue and feeds almost exclu- 
sively on blueberry pollen and nectar 
during flowering. Researchers hope to 
eventually place nests of these pollina- 
tors in commercial blueberry fields, but 
have not yet been able to follow these 
bees to their nesting sites in the woods. 
In contrast, 65-100% of honeybees enter 
blueberry flowers through the holes at 
the base of the flower made by carpen- 
ter bees, and do not pollinate the flower. 

Canadian researchers found that 
optimal blueberry production was 
obtained when 10 gallons of peat was 
incorporated in the planting hole, and 
plants were mulched with sawdust and 
irrigated with a trickle system. Several 
other researchers reported on the 
importance of a low soil pH, and the 
problem of planting blueberries on 
high-lime soils. 

In an interesting study from Michi- 
gan, foliar levels of phosphorus, cal- 
cium, boron and magnesium have been 
declining since 1964, indicating future 
problems if not corrected. Germany is 
already experiencing problems when 
blueberries are planted in soils pre- 
viously used for agriculture. The cause 
of this replant problem is unknown. 

Several new virus diseases have been 



identified in Washington, Oregon, 
Michigan and New Jersey. These may 
spread to the Northeast. 

The blueberry is one of the few fruit 
crops with a bright future. 

For this future to be realized, how- 
ever, support must be maintained for 
small fruit research programs. 




CRANBERRY 

GROWERS 

REALTY 

Listings of buyers and 

sellers welcomed on 

cranberry acreage 

and upland. 

Appraisals 

DOUGLAS R. BEATON 

E. Sandwich, Mass 

02537 

(617)888-1288 



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CRANBERRIES July 1989 Page 19 



Weather 

MASSACHUSETTS 

April was cool, averaging 1.4 degrees a day 
below normal. Maximum temperature was 64 
degrees on both the 18th and 27th and the 
minimum was 24 degrees on the 12th. Gener- 
ally, the first half of the month was very cold 
and the last half a little above normal. 

Rainfall totaled 5.88 Inches or 1.6 Inches 
above normal, our first above normal rainfall 
since November. There was measurable pre- 
cipitation on 15 days, with 2 inches on the 
15th and 16th as the greatest storm. We are 
about 2 inches below normal for the year and 
just even with 1988. 

There were frost warnings from April 22-25. 
Temperatures were mostly 15-16 degrees on 
the 22nd but some were in single numbers. 
Dew points were very low and there were 
many reports of sprinkler heads freezing dur- 
ing the night. No reportsof injuryatthistime. 

I.E.D. 

ObituaxTT 

Antone J. Jesus 

Antone J. "Manche" Jesus, 98, of 
Onset, Mass., died April 10 after a brief 
illness. He was the widower of Lucy 
(Hillman) Jesus and son of the late 
Joseph and Anna (Gomes) Jesus. 

Jesus died at the New England Bap- 
tist Hospital, Boston. 

He was born in Brava, Cape Verde 
Islands, and immigrated to this cotm- 
try in 1903. He lived in Wareham most 
of his life. 

He worked as a whaler and in the 
New Bedford cotton mills before his 
many years in the cranberry business. 
Employed by the Fuller & Hammond 
Cranberry Company for 60 years, he 
was a long time foreman there. 

Jesus retired at the age of 89 and his 
remembrances were captured in the 
book. Spinner: People and Culture in 
Southeastern Massachusetts, Volume 
III, New Bedford, 1984. 

He is survived by three daughters, 
Dorothy Britto of New Bedford and 
Beatrice Becker and Elizabeth Jesus, 
both of California; a stepdaughter, 
Mary Barrows of Wareham; two sons. 
Napoleon "Nappy" of Wareham and 
Avelino "Lino" of Onset; a sister, Kena 
Jesus of Wareham; 22 grandchildren; 
36 great-grandchildren; 1 9 great-great- 
grandchildren; and a great-great-great- 
grandson. 

FERMENTA CHANGES 
ITS COMPANY TITLE 

P'ermenta Plant Protection Co. of Mentor, 
Ohnio, has changed its name to Fermenta 
AS(; Corporation, announces company 
president Richard L. Urbanowski. 
Page 20 CRANBERRIES July 1989 



50 
Years 
Ago 



Cape Cod grower William R. 
Wheeler related how his "Harvest 
Queen" label was named after a 
shipwreck his grandfather, Capt. 
James R. Wheeler, had survived. 

According to an account in the 
Boston Advertiser onMarch20,lS61, 



^ Gapen 

^^^ Realty 



Cranberry Marsh 

FOR SALE 

*6 acres planted, '17 acres ready 

to be planted *3 homes 

$175,000 

Washburn County. WI 

— 2141 8th street South 
Wisconsin Rapids .Wisconsin 54494 

(715)423-6550 



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Krause Excavating, inc. 



Canal work 

Pond Construction 



Ditching 
l^nd Clearing 



1-1/4-3 yd. draglines with 80' boom and matts, 2 yd. 
backhoe, swamp dozer and other related equipment. 



contact: 



Roger Krause 1-414-398-3322 
Route 3 Markesan. Wis. 53946 



the Baroque Harvest Queen, piloted 
by Captain Wheeler, was wrecked on 
the Scituate cliffs during a heavy 
northeaster. The ship was headed for 
Boston from Buenos Aires via New 
York with a cargo of wool when "a 
terrific gale with a thick snowstorm" 
developed. 

Captain Wheeler reported heading 
the ship toward what he thought was 
the Boston light when the ship hit 
"hard bottom." 

According to the Advertiser, the 
crew then "lost sight of light, took in 
all sail and let go both anchors in 
four fathoms. Found it impossible to 
keep from going ashore and prepared 
to leave with the boats." 

The light that Captain Wheeler 
steered by turned out to be — not the 
Boston light — but a large fire built 
by watchmen on the Scituate shore. 

Six of the crew drowned when their 



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Trailer or Permanent 

Electric, Tractor or 

Engine Driven 

PHIL HELMER 
(715)421-0917 




Equipment, inc. 

381 West Grove St. (Rte. 28) 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

(508) 947-6299 

^KUBOTR 

Tractors, Excavators and 
Diesel Generators 

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Wheel Loaders 
3/4 Yd -6 1/2 Yd 




innsmsjii 

Screening Equipment 



■ 



boat capsized on the way to land. The 
captain, mate, second mate and a 
passenger were saved by people on 
shore. 

William R. Wheeler called his 
cranberries "Harvest Queen of the 
C's." In the 1930's he campaigned to 
educate the public on the difference 
between Early Blacks and Howes. 
He packaged Early Blacks with the 
label, "Piccaninnies," which appar- 
ently caused a less eyebrow raising 
reaction then than it would today. 

—Carolyn Gilmore 



Wanted 

Wisconsin Cranberry 
Grower wishes to purchase 
an existing cranberry marsh. 

STEVE 

(715)421-0917 
(715) 593-2385 



WAJVTED 

Gravel €f Sand 

in the southeastern Massachusetts area 

Quantities of 10,000 yards and up 

Complete site work, bog construction and finished 

contouring of surrounding area plus the best price 

for your material. 



Michael Coan 
Carver, Mass. 
(508) 866-5285 



Earl White 

Medfield, Mass. 

(508) 359-7291 



^\).GRAS^ 



/ 




SERVICES 



Herbicides 
Applied 

Custom Pruning 
Custom DItctiIng 



Sanding 

Wiping 

Wet Harvesting 

Mowing 

(Mowing includes 
Hydraulic Arm 
Flail Mower.) 



West Wareham, Ask for Rick at 
Massachusetts 295-5158 

iSl^ jifc J^ J^k Jte ^^ jfe dfe ^k ^fe ^k ^k ^k jik ^k jlk Jik jifc jifc Jlk jte'^n 

CRANBERRIES July 1989 Page 21 




Cranberry Originals 



T-Shirt 

"CRANBERRIES 

North America's Native Fruit" 

An Original Botanical Design 

of Blossonos and Green & Ripe Cranberries 

by 

Adult T-Shirt (Sizes S, M, L, XL) $12 

Adult XXL T-Shirt $14 

Youth Size 14-16 T-Shirt $11 

Children's Sizes 4, 6-8, 10-12 $11 

Adult Sweatshirt (S, M, L, XL) $25 

Adult XXL Sweatshirt $28 

Youth 14-16 Sweatshirt $21 

Children's Sweatshirt (4,6-8, 10-12) $19 



Send Check or Monty Order to: 
CRANBERRIES 

P.O. Box 249 
Cobalt, CT 06414 

Add $3.50 Shipping & Handling Charge 
For Canadian orders, add $8 



Nanne 

Address 

City State Zip. 




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POLE \iS^ SERVICE 

• Private Poles • Line Construction 

• Sonotube Drilling • New & Used Poles 

(508) 690-2238 

208 Franklin St., East Bridgewater, MA 02333 



WISCONSIN CRANBERRY 
HEADQUARTERS FOR 
SEVINXLR 



DEVRINOL 10G • EVITAL • GUTHION 
DIAZINON 14G « PARATHION • ETHREL 

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537 Atlas Ave., P.O. Box 7211, Madison, Wl 53707 
(608) 221-6204 or 1-800-362-8049 





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MOWING (all types) * ditching 

WATER HARVESTING * SANDING 



''Specializing in the Needs of Small Growers^' 




72 Brook St. 

Plympton, MA 02367 

1-617-585-9830 



Page 22 CRANBERRIES July 1989 





DRESSER 



BARK RIVER 

Quality products and 
% trained, dedicated people 
Wf standing behind them. 




It's a combination that adds up to top production for you! 

Then add BARK RIVER'S full line of other quality tools and equipment and you have 
a complete source for all your equipment needs, all backed with dependable product support. 



81 



Crawler Loaders Draglines 


Hydraulic Excavators 


Rollers Trucks (off-highway) 


Crawler Tractors Drills 


Hydraulic Shovels 


Scrapers Wheel Loaders 


Graders 


Planers 


Shovels 


• FRINK SNOW-PLOWS 


• HITACHI EXCAVATORS 
AND CRANES 


• KOLMAN CONVEYORS 


• FMC WAYNE STREET 




• MORBARK EEGER 


SWEEPERS 


• PAPER, CALMENSON 
BLADES AND CUTTING 


BEEVER CHIPPERS 


• CLARK-BOBCAT SKID 


EDGES 


• FAIR SNOWBLOWERS 


STEER LOADERS 






• WISCONSIN TRAILERS 


• FOX SPREADERS 

• WALDON LOADERS 


• AMZ ASPHALT PATCHING 
EQUIPMENT 


• VAC-ALL BY LEACH 

• GAFNER IRON MULE 


• GRADALL INC. 
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• SICARD SNOWBLAST 
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• TIGER HIGHWAY MOWERS • MURPHY DIESEL ENGINES 



Manufacturers of corrugated steel & aluminum culvert pipe and drainage products. 




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Backing you with 82 years of experience. 



EAU CLAIRE 
1700 Western Avenue 
Phone (715) 835-5157 



MADISON 
Highway 51 & Buckeye Rd. 
Phone (606) 222-4151 



GREEN BAY 
600 Liberty Street 
Phone (414) 435-6676 



SUPERIOR 
1213 Winter Street 
Phone (715) 392-2243 



ESCANABA 
430 N. Lincoln Street 
Phone (906) 786-6920 



MILWAUKEE 
11715 W. Silver Spring Rd. 
Phone (414) 461-5440 



CRANBERRIES July 1989 Page 23 



Take Good 

Care of ISmrself 

Have an Ocean Spray! 




^ns^^'^y 



The farmer's cooperative that brings you 
a wide range of natural fruit juices, drinks and sauces 

Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc., Lakeville-Middleboro, MA 02349 
An Equal Opportunity Employer 



t 



^<_ 




CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

August 1989 Vol. 53, No. 8 



--. ••':> 




Craisins & Raisins Square Off 



Memories of Charley Doehlert 




Growers to Raise 



£0010 yw 

isyanwy 

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Ayyyein ssyw jo aimii 



The Pilgrim stands behind 
every commercial loan 

BobTracy 
make% 

And that's a 
promise. 

Call him on it at 746-330a '''*' 

The Pilgrim is a symbol of strength, integrity and experience 
and it best personifies the resources Bob Tracy offers every busi- 
ness that turns to him for help. 

An assistant vice president of our commercial banking opera- 
tion, Bob has over 15 years of banking know-how. His expertise 
has helped to earn us a reputation as The Answer Bank. 

Backed by the superior lending capabilities of Plymouth Savings 
Bank, Bob can design a commercial lending package with the 
attractive rates and fast turnaround time that you need. 

This is the power and the promise of the Pilgrim. 

Call Bob Tracy at 746-3300. 




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Page 2 CRANBKRRIES August 1989 



Court Challenge Being Studied 



Raisin l\/lakers Aren't 
Craisy Over Craisins 



"Sour Grapes" 
Say Supporters 
Of Ocean Spray 

(Will the Craisin and the raisin 
coexist amicably in the universe of 
^nack foods and cereal and pastry 
ngredients? Or will the current 
dispute over the word Craisin wind 
ip in court? Will Ocean Spray be 
'orced to use another word for its 
iried cranberry? Or will the raisin 
aeople have to stop stewing and 
simply accept their little red 
competitor — and its name? 

All those questions and others 
ire up in the air pending the out- 
come of action initiated by the 
ZJalifomia Raisin Advisory Board 

foased in Fresno. 
The advisory board has asked 
:he California attorney general to 
ook into whether Ocean Spray can 
egally use the word Craisin. The 



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raisin growers claim that by using 
the word, Ocean Spray is exploit- 
ing the popularity of the raisin. 

The raisin people have spent mil- 
lions over the last several years to 
elevate their product. Much of that 
money has gone into parading 
before TV audiences its sunglass 
wearing, sneakered California rai- 
sin, strutting to a Motown beat. 

Ocean Spray spokespersons dis- 
pute the raisin growers' stand. 

"I don't think there's any confu- 
sion here," said the cooperative's 
John Lawlor. "It's very clear when 
you say Craisins are dried cranber- 
ries you're not getting a raisin. We 
don't feel it's unfair." 

Ocean Spray registered the word 
Craisin as a trademark last October. 
To avoid confusion, says the coop- 
erative, labels will read CRAISIN 
DRIED CRANBERRIES. 

A meeting between cranberry and 
raisin representatives took place in 
California June 29. The session 
was described as "frank" but 
apparently there was no resolution 
to the controversy. Among those 
present was Ocean Spray lawyer 
Ken Beeby. 

The reason California Attorney 
General John Van de Kamp is in 
the act, according to Clyde Nef, 
manager of the California Raisin 
Advisory Board, is that the raisin 
industry operates under a state 



COVER ILLUSTRATION 
KATHLEEN M. GEOSITS, 
artist for The Boston Herald, 
created this cartoon depicting 
the battle betw^een the raisin 
and the Craisin. 

Kathleen M Geoslts/Boston Herald 



marketing order. The board wants 
to find out if the use of Craisin in 
any way violates any name protec- 
tion provisions of the marketing 
order. 

If the state can't act, a private 
suit will be considered, says Nef. 

"We're not very happy about 
what's going on," he said. 

Asked whether he thought the 
attention drawn to Craisins might 
indirectly aid the raisin industry, 
Nef replied that he thought the 
opposite would happen. 

"A shiny, sticky, rather tart pro- 
duct might be looked upon as a 
very poor quality raisin," Nef said. 
' ' If people react negatively , it might 
reflect on raisins." 

The controversy has drawn 
widespread interest. Among the 
calls received by CRANBERRIES 
was one from a London newspaper. 
Journals from coast to coast have 
carried the story and so have such 
national periodicals at Time. 

Expectedly, the story has given 



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OCEAN SPRAY envisages Craisins being used in a wide variety of products, 
including cereals, baked goods and dairy items. They'll also be marketed as 
a convenient, mouth poppin' snack. 



1' 



birth to much satire and spoofs. 

EditoriaUsts have jumped into 
the fray. A New Bedford (Mass.) 
Standard Times writer concluded: 

"And maybe it's just a case of 
rooting for the home team, but 
Ocean Spray sounds like it has a 
winner here. Any grousing from 
the West Coast ought to be filed 
under 'sour grapes.'" 

What if a suit is filed? Would 
Ocean Spray consider a name 
change? 

An Ocean Spray spokesperson 
said any response would depend on 
an analysis of the suit itself. Right 
now, the cranberry cooperative is 
sticking fast to Craisin, which grew 
out of a "name generating session" 
at Ocean Spray. 

Craisins, which resemble red 
raisins, are sliced cranberries that 
are sweetened in a cranberry juice 
concentrate and then dried in a ser- 
ies of hot-air chambers. 

Tyson Foods uses Craisins in the 
stuffing for one of its frozen chicken 
dinners. Weil-Bred Loaf Co. puts 
Craisins into its cake slices. Soon 
Craisins will show up with raisins 

Page 4 CRANBERRIES August 1989 



in Ralston Purina Company's 
Muesli cereal. 

Craisins as a snack food, pack- 
aged in 1-ounce pouches, with six 
pouches to a box, will be available 
sometime next year. An Ocean 
Spray spokesperson said testing 
on the product still is taking place. 



Not everyone in the raisin Indus 
try is upset by the prospect of i\ 
Craisin craze. 

"I think the whole thing is i 
tempest in a teapot," Terry Whit 
ney, president of the West Coas 
Growers and Packers of Selma 
Calif., was quoted as saying to thi 



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But other voices voice rage. Ern- 
est Bedrosian, president of the 
National Raisin Co., Fowler, Calif., 
declared: 

"We've spent millions of dollars 
building the raisin image up as a 
healthy, natural fruit of the sun. 
Now they put a c in front of it and 
call it a Craisin. We made it so pop- 
ular, they just want to shirttail on 
our success." 

"If it's a cranberry, why don't 
they call it a cranberry?" asked the 
California Raisin Advisory Board's 
Don Martens. 

The board's manager, Clyde Nef, 
said that in the past Ocean Spray 
has used the name of another pro- 
duct only when that product was 
tied in with the cranberry. He cited 
cranapple as an example. In the 
case of raisins, he said, there is no 
such tie-in. 

The raisin spokesman drew a 
parallel between the raisin-Craisin 
controversy and the recent Gallo 
brothers case in California. In that 



case, the Gallo brothers of wine 
fame, Ernest and Julio, sued their 
younger brother, Joseph, because 
he used the Gallo name on a cheese 
he marketed. The winery brothers 
won. 

"If the court decided Gallo 
couldn't even use his name, how 
can Ocean Spray get away with the 
use of raisin in Craisin?" asked 
Nef. 



The industry with which Ocean 
Spray is locked in battle comprises 
about 4,500 growers. Some, such as 
Sun Maid, a cooperative which 
comprises about one-third of the 
industry, and Delmonte and Dole, 
are giants. Most are family opera- 
tions, many of which produce other 
crops, such as cotton, tree fruits 
and nuts. 

All exist within about 100 miles 



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CRANBERRIES August 1989 Page 5 



in central California, except for a 
handful in Arizona. They produce 
about 40 percent of the world's 
supply. Their crop value last year 
was worth about $550 million. 

Bedrosian owns that the Craisin 
could result in serious competition. 

"If this Craisin is priced any- 
where near our product, then natu- 
rally it's going to cut in," he told 
the Boston Herald. 

Ocean Spray had more than $780 
million in sales last year, built lar- 
gely on a knack for inventing a use 
for cranberries in a myriad of pro- 
ducts. Among some 40 products it 
has launched, there has been only 
one setback: cranprune juice. 



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Page 6 CRANBERRIt:S August 1989 



Cranberry Memo From C.LA. 

Editor's Note: The following memo was delivered to the 
CRANBERRIES office by a mysterious individual wear- 
ing an oversized raincoat, a crumpled fedora and smoked 
glasses. "Dis is from . . . ,"he said, in a muffled voice, and 
we didn't quite get the name. But it sounded like David 
Pheromone. 



From: C.I.A. (Cranberry Information Agency) 

Date: 15 June 1989 

RE: "Sour Grapes" 

It has been widely reported that thousands of Raisins were 
staging sit-down strikes in Fresno, Calif., to protest the intro- 
duction of Craisins. Raisin spokesperson D. Ried Grapes 
stated that millions of raisins are worried that their job secur- 
ity is threatened because of Craisins. "Where does an unem- 
ployed raisin go?" read one of the posters. 

Cranberry industry spokesperson Ms. Ima Cranberry said she 
hoped that the Raisins would not get bogged down in dealing 
with the Craisin phenomenon that is sweeping the Nation. 

DEADLINE HOLLYWOOD: 

Unconfirmed reports stated that the rock group, "California 
Raisins," may cancel further tours of the East Coast because 
of the Craisin controversy. Rumor also has it that one of the 
backup singers for the group may actually be an undersized 
prune named P. Danish. 

An anonymous caller from a group calling themselves C.A.R. 
(Craisins Ain't Raisins) said that the American people will 
ultimately determine whether Craisins and Raisins can exist 
together in a free society. 

WALL STREET: 

Raisin stocks drop 50 points on rumors that some cereal 
makers may cut the number of scoops of raisins in their 
prooduct in half to make room for craisins. 

DISCLAIMER: 

This report from the C.I.A. contains no real or factual informa- 
tion and all names have been changed to protect any craisins 
or raisins, living or dead. It was generated to inject some 
humor and as a result of the craisined mind of the writer. 



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gt88jBsaass!SSgB!sagga s a c a s B Sgs sai BBss i s a gS i «S 8 ^^ 





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What's in a Name? 

Will Ocean Spray and the raisin growers be able to come to 
an agreement over use of the word Craism or will the dispute 
wind up in court? 

If the latter occurs, it's safe to say the outcome couldn't be 
predicted with certainty. 

This writer knows a couple of young fellows who opened a 
video store and called it Video Shack. More than a year later, 
they received a letter from a lawyer representing Radio Shack. 
The word shack, the letter read, can't be used. 

The lawyer for Video Shack told the young entrepreneurs 
they might win the case but spend years in court and thou- 
sands of dollars. Their counselor also told them Radio Shack 
already had won a suit against a chain called Chicken Shack. 
The two changed the name of their store from Video Shack to 
West Main Video. 

Not to say there's a parallel here. But in this field of litiga- 
tion, many things can happen, including those that defy lay- 
man's logic. 

Let's Hear It For IPM 

There's a disturbing statistic in a piece in The New York 
Times by Philip Shabecoff. 

In it he cites a Department of Agriculture finding that crop 
losses from insects have nearly doubled in the postwar era, to 
13 percent from 7 percent. 

This despite an explosion in the use of chemical controls. 

Nobody in agriculture would be in favor of a wholesale 
chucking of pesticides. 

But the figures do underscore the efficacy of employing an 
array of weapons for control. 

Integrated pest management definitely is here to stay. 




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May was warm, averaging 1.8 degrees above 
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first half of the month was average or below 
and the last half was well above average. 

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CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

SEND CORRESPONDENCE TO: 

P.O. BOX 249 

COBALT CT 06414 

(203) 342-4730 

Fax #: (203) 342-1977 

PUBLISHER a EDITOR: BOB TAYLOR 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: CAROLYN GILMORE 
(508) 763-5206 

ADVISORS & CORRESPONDENTS 

MASSACHUSETTS — Irving E Demoranville, 
Director, Cranberry Experiment Station 

NEW JERSEY - Phillip E Marucci. Cranberry & Blueberry 
Specialist. Buddtown. Elizabeth G. Carpenter, Chatsworth. 

NOVA SCOTIA — Robert A Murray. Horticulturist. Berry 
Crops. Research Station, Truro 

OREGON — Arthur Poole. Coos County Extension Agent, 
Coquille 

WASHINGTON — Azmi Y Shawa. Horticulturist and 
retired Director, Coastal Washington Research & Extension 
Unit. Long Beach 

WISCONSIN — Tod D Planer, Farm Management Agent, 
Wood County 

CRANBERRIES Is pubilihed monthlyby DIveralfled Periodi- 
cals, Wellwyn Drive, Portland CT 06480. Second class 
tage Is paid at the Portland, Conn. Post Office. Price 
year, $28 for two years, $2 a copy In the U.S.; $17 a year In 
Canada; $20 a year In all other countries. Back copies: $2.50, 
Including postage. Copyright 1 968 by Diversified Periodicals. 

ISSN: 0011.0787 

Postmaster, send Form 3749 to: 

CRANBERRIES 

P.O. BOX 249 

COBALT CT 06414 



Perlodl- 
lass pos- 
a Is $151 

. ...... IH 



Pages CRANBKRRIF:S August 1989 



, REGIONAL 
I NOTES 

MASSACHUSETTS 

By IRVING E. DEMORANVILLE 

Dr. Robert Devlin of the Cranberry Experi- 
ment Station was invited to visit and lecture in 
Poland May 14-23. Bob vi^as invited by the 
Academy of Agriculture at Szczecin to lec- 
ture on herbicide physiology. He lectured at 
theWarsawUniversity Academies of Agricul- 
ture at Warsaw, Szczecin and Cracow and at 
the Pomology Institute at Akierniewice. 



Weather data through June 1 show a total 
of 4 points of a possible 16 that favor keeping 
quality for the 1989 Massachusetts cranberry 
crop. The prospect is for fair to poor keeping 
quality. The spring has been wetter than 
normal and May was the warmest since 1 979; 
this does not favor keeping quality. We 
strongly recommend fungicide treatments 
both for protection of the fruit and the vines. 

By CAROLYN GILMORE 

During a recent visit to the Massachusetts 
Cranberry Experiment Station in East Ware- 
ham, Joseph Walsh, the Republic of Ireland's 
food minister, promised to help open the 



Common Market to more imports of Ameri- 
can cranberries. Walsh was treated to a lun- 
cheon (cranberry tarts and juice were on the 
menu) and a bog tour by the Cape Code 
Cranberry Growers' Association. The Irish 
official said he was "delighted" with the atti- 
tude of growers toward pesticides and chem- 
ical food additives, subjects of great concern 
to Europeans. Growers, he said, "put the con- 
sumer first and are very serious about the 
quality of food." 

******** 

Hal Thorkilsen, retired president and CEO 
of Ocean Spray, was recently presented the 
Farm Credit Banks of Springfield (Mass.) 
Agricultural Leader Award. In presenting the 
award, Norman P. Harvey, chairman of the 
Springfield Bank for Cooperatives, cited 
Thorkilsen's work in transforming Ocean 
Spray from a commodity business to a con- 
sumer oriented marketing cooperative. Dur- 
ing his tenure, Harvey noted. Ocean Spray's 
sales climbed 750 percent from $87 million to 
$736 million. Net proceeds to farmer members, 
he said, increased by 800 percent, from $23 
million to $207 million. Thorkilsen joins an 
illustriousgroup of Agricultural Leader Award 
recipients, including Patrick Leahy and 
George Aiken, U.S. Senators from Vermont, 
and George C.P. Olsson, honorary chairman 
of the board of Ocean Spray. 

NEW JERSEY 

Guided tours of nearby cranberry bogs and 



blueberry farms were one of the features of 
the sixth annual Whitesbog Blueberry Festi- 
val last month. Also featured were lours of 
Whitesbog Village, where the cultivated 
blueberry was first developed by Elizabeth 
White between 1910 and 1916. Other high- 
lights were crafts by Pinelands crafstmen, 
folk and bluegrass music and acts by the 
John Herald Band, the Geoff Caldwell Blues 
and Jug Band, Mike Agranoff, Claire Rey- 
nolds and Rhythm Is Our Business, and Steve 
Key, and a two mile run. The festival is spon- 
sored with the assistance of the New Jersey 
Division of Travel and Tourism, Tru Blue 
Cooperative, Pemberton Township and the 
Lebanon State Forest office. Money raised by 
the festival goes toward restoration of his- 
toric buildings at Whitesbog. 

WASHINGTON 

Washington State University is seeking a 
horticulturist to replace the retired Azmi Y. 
Shawa as director of the Long Beach Research 
and Extension Unit, which conducts cran- 
berry extension and research services for the 
state's cranberry industry. The post is a tenure 
track position in the university's department 
of horticulture and landscape architecture. 
Applicants should request information and 
applications from Dr. Fenton E. Larsen, Search 
Committee Chair, Department of Landscape 
/Architecture, Washington State University, 
Pullman, WA 99164-6414. 








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CRANBERRIES August 1989 Pag 9 



Massachusetts Apiarist Says 



Learning About Bees Is 
A Never Ending Process 



Lloyd Bissonnette 
Figures Bog Owners 
Will Raise Own Bees 
Sometime in Future 

By CAROLYN GILMORE 

Lloyd Bissonnette's bees stay put. 

A Lakeville, Mass., beekeeper 
with upwards of 450 pollinating 
hives, he limits the excursions of 
his bees to Bay State cranberry 
bogs, blueberry patches and some 
apple orchards. 

Overwintering hives in his less 
than benign winter climate is no 
problem — "if you take care of 
them." 

"Just like raising cranberries, you 
have to follow certain rules," 
declares Bissonnette. 

In the fall, all his colonies get fed 
two gallons of syrup with medica- 
tion for extra food and nosma dis- 
ease prevention. He also takes steps 
to protect his hives against mite 
infestation. 

As a member of the statewide 
Agricultural Bee Alliance, Bisson- 
nette joined forces with other bee- 
keepers and growers to successfully 
petition Massachusetts to approve 
menthol crystal for controlling 
tracheal mites. They also sought 
the adoption of emergency regula- 
tions to make sure that imported 
bees are either mite free or under- 
going treatment. 

"All we were asking for was the 
weapons to fight this with," said 
Bissonnette. 

The Alliance was formed earlier 
this year as a forum through which 
beekeepers and growers could 
address issues affecting pollination. 

"SOONER or later, the bog men 
will bp raising their own bees," 

Page 10 CRANBERRIES August 1989 




AT DUSK, when all his bees are safely home, Lloyd 
Bissonette poses in front of one of his 450 hives. 

(CRANBERRIES photo by Carolyn Gilmore) 



Bissonnette said. 

With the federal government 
abandoning regulatory efforts and 
uncertainty about state actions, 
Massachusetts growers will be safer 
relying on permanently located 
hives for their pollination needs, he 
explained. 



Growers, he said, can start their 
colonies either from packaged bees 
or established hives. A good 
resource for buying established 
hives is The American Bee Jour- 
nal, he noted. 

"Just make sure the hives have 
been treated for disease," he added. 



Bissonnette said the health of a 
hive and its poUinating strength 
cannot be judged from observing 
bees in shght. 

"You have to look in the box," he 
explained. 

A good pollinating unit should 
have six to eight frames of brood. 

In his day-to-day operation, Bis- 
sonnette drives around to different 
bogs to examine his hives. 

"I check the hives to see if the 
queen is laying," he said. "If a hive 
is no good to my bee customer, it is 
no good to me. Anytime a customer 
wants to look in the hive, I will 
open the box." 

BISSONNETTE learned about 
bees from his father. 

"When I was about 10 years old, I 
used to go bee hunting with my 
father," he said. "When we found a 
hive, we would have to get permis- 
sion to cut the tree. My father was 
my teacher. He rented bees in the 
30's and 40's." 

Bissonnette's own three sons have 
also grown up with bees and they 
help move bees today when needed. 
Rod Rodriques, Bissonnette's son- 
in-law, also has an apiary and bee 
supply business and is available as 
a bee consultant. 

Bissonnette is generous with his 
lifetime of bee knowledge. He has 
trained so many bee inspectors over 
the years that he has lost count. 

Wayne Andrews, a state bee 
inspector who examines thousands 

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BISSONNETTE and his son-in-law, Rod Rodriques, and 
granddaughter, Jennifer Rodriques. 

(CRANBERRIES photo by Carolyn Gilmore) 



of hives in the cranberry growing 
area each year, rates Bissonnette's 
operation as one of the best. 

Raising bees is a continuous 
education for Bissonette. In this 



way, he is like the noted bee 
researcher, E.R. Root, who, on his 
dying day, said he would like to 
know half of what there is to know 
about the bee. 



Beekeepers Given 
Okay on Menthol 



In a move designed to help bee- 
keepers protect their hives from 
tracheal mite, Massachuusetts has 
approved the use of menthol to 
combat the highly destructive pre- 
dator. The state claims to be the 
first to formally approve use of the 
chemical. 

The state Pesticide Board sub- 
committee approved two formula- 
tions of menthol crystals to be used 
agEiinst the widespread tracheal 
mite, which experts say could des- 
troy 90 percent of the state's 10,000 



resident hives if left unchecked. 

The menthol treatments had been 
approved for use by the federal 
Environmental Protection Agency 
but individual states must register 
the product before it can be used. 

"This gives our beekeepers a tool 
to control tracheal mites," said 
Warren Shepard, chief of the state 
Bureau of Plant Pest Control. "This 
should give our beekeepers an edge 
over their counterparts in other 
states in the battle against a pe^ 
that is very damaging to h' y- 



CRANBERRIES August 1989 Pag ; li 



bees." 

The tracheal mite is so named 
because it plugs the windpipe of 
honeybees, with death ensuing. In 
Great Britain, the tracheal mite 
wiped out the bee population. Offi- 
cials say the potential for such des- 
truction exists here, as well. The 
menthol treatment, however, is very 
effective at eradicating significant 
numbers of tracheal mites without 
harming the bees in any way. 

In addition to the 10,000 resident 
hives, Massachusetts is also a 
temporary home to 1 5,000 to 20,000 
migratory hives which are brought 
to the state each year to pollinate 
the apple and cranberry crops. 

The ruling by the Pesticide Board 
means Massachusetts beekeepers 
are free to purchase and use as 
much menthol as they require. Only 
two dealers, Dadant & Son in 
Hamilton, 111., and Mann Lake 
Supply in Hackensack, Minn., are 
authorized to sell the product, 
however. 

Detailed directions cover use of 
menthol as well as the chemical's 
storage and disposal. 

China is the world's major supp- 



lier of menthol. Prices for the pro- 
duct have been going up, attribu- 
table in part perhaps to the recent 
troubles in China. The greatest 
demand for menthol is by candy 
manufacturers. 




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CRANBERRIES August 1989 Pag; i3 



Pioneer Cranberry & Blueberry Scientist 





By PHIL MARUCCI 

Charles A. Doehlert, former 
director of the Rutgers Cranberry 
and Blueberry Research Laboratory 
and secretary of the American 
Cranberry Growers Association for 
20 years, died at Christmas time in 
1987. He was a pioneer in the science 
of cranberry and blueberry culture. 
The work done at the substation of 
the New Jersey Agricultural 
Experiment Station by Doehlert 
and his associates (R.B. Wilcox, 
C.S. Beckwith, W.E. Tomlinson) 
contributed much to the progress of 
these new crops when they were in 
their early stages of development 
and during periods of crisis. 

CHARLIE was a man of admirable 
character and of great versatility. In 
these days of high specialization, it is 
hard to believe that during his career at 
the experiment station he served as 
editor, horticulturist, entomologist and 
even as an agricultural engineer. 

It was as an extension agent that 
Charlie made the most effective and 
significant impacts on individual 
growers and the entire cranberry and 
blueberry industries. He fostered a very 
close relationship with growers. His 
frequent visits to farms and field 
demonstrations were at the heart of his 
modus operandi. He also encouraged 
growers to become involved in the 
direction and planning of the work of 
the experiment station. 

I remember an incident which dem- 
onstrated growers' cooperativeness and 
anxiety to help during Doehlert's 
tenure. It occurred very shortly after I 
arrived at the Pemberton laboratory in 
1948. Charlie was concerned about not 
being able to provide a needed facility 
to conduct my insect vector research. 

As was his custom when problems 
arose, he contacted the Growers Advi- 
sory Committee. He wrote a short note 
on a postal card, addressed to eight 
growers and requesting their presence 
at a meeting a few days hence to dis- 
cuss a problem. All of the growers 
attended and the problem was solved 
in a few minutes. 

Growers provided all of the labor and 

Page 14 CRANBERRIES August 1989 




CHARLES A. DOEHLERT was 
blueberry culture. 

equipment and some of the materials to 
build a screenhouse which would assure 
that no insects would feed on blueberry 
test plants. Incidentally, the cost of 
this communication with growers was 
8 cents; postal cards still cost only a 
single penny. 

ANOTHER memorable feature of 
Doehlert's extension work was his rit- 
ual of making regular visits with county 
agents to blueberry fields and cran- 



a pioneer in cranberry and I 

(Photo by Adam Stein) I 

berry bogs. It was already understood 
that growers with urgent problems 
could get immediate attention by tele- 
phoning the station; the reaction to 
such a call was as a fireman's to a fire. 
For a general review of farm practices 
and general inspection of farm condi- 
tions, a farmer could call his county 
agent to schedule a date for a visit. 

Once a month, Charlie would visit 
Burlington County fields with Dan 



Kensler, Atlantic County fields with 
John Brockett and Ocean County fields 
with Dick Hartman. (All of these county 
agents had national reputations and 
are now legendary in New Jersey.) In 
this way, the opportunity to receive 
expert opinions and authoritative 
recommendations for individual farm 
situations was open to every blueberry 
and cranberry grower in the state. 

Inexperienced newcomers were par- 
ticularly interested in using the ser- 
vice, but even experienced and success- 
ful growers felt they needed it to sharpen 
their alertness and efficiency. 

CHARLES Doehlert's name should 



live on not only for the influence he had 
in his extension work but also for his 
meaningful and important research 
work. 

He was one of the first to work on 
cranberry and blueberry nutrition. 
Some of the fundamental fertilizer 
practices still regularly carried out in 
these crops are the results of his 
research. His "Facts About Blueberry 
Fertilization" (N.J. Ag. Exp. Sta. Cir- 
cular 550, 1953) is still one of the most 
sought pieces of blueberry literature. 

Charlie was also one of the first in 
the country to study airplane applica- 
tions of fertilizers and pesticides. His 



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CRANBERRIES August 1989 Page 15 



early studies in blueberry pruning set 
the guidelines for this most important 
blueberry operation. Those guidelines 
still are being used. 

Blueberry propagation as now prac- 
ticed commercially varies very little 
from his original findings and recom- 
mendations. With Ray Wilcox and 
Charles Beckwith, he helped to battle 
the cranberry false blossom disease 
plague which swept through New Jer- 
sey bogs from 1918 to the early 1950's, 
demoralizing growers and almost 



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completely eliminating the cranberry 
industry in the state. 

He was the developer of the Doehlert 
Discs, which enabled growers to prop- 
erly cultivate blueberry plantings 
without inflicting the serious root 
damage caused by conventional culti- 
vators. With Bill Tomlinson and this 
writer he helped to discover the vector 
of blueberry stunt disease which posed 
a serious threat to the blueberry indus- 
try of New Jersey in the 1940's and 
1950's. With Charles Beckwith he 
helped in research to develop practical 
sanding procedures and water man- 
agement techniques for cranberries. 

IT is not generally known that Char- 
les Doehlert was the discoverer of stem 
canker disease. This is the most des- 
tructive natural enemy of blueberries 
in North Carolina and has recently 
begun to make inroads in New Jersey 
in a few areas on a few cultivars. This 
fungus disease is endemic in North 
Carolina and was not even known by 
plant pathologists until it was noticed 
by Charlie and brought to the attention 
of scientists on one of his infrequent 
trips to the southern blueberry area. 

This is an example of Charlie's keen 
powers of observation. In the field his 
senses were strongly attuned to the 
normal condition of a blueberry plant 
or a cranberry vine; any semblance of 



variation from the norm would be 
immediately recognized in an almost 
automatic reaction. He also had the 
rare skill of evaluating the abnormal 
symptoms in terms of cause and effect. 
Charlie was a dedicated and indus- 
trious worker who planned his experi- 
ments in scrupulous detail and carried 
them out with diligence and precision. 
While he had many attributes of a work- 
aholic, he could not be described as one 
for that implies a singlemindedness 



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that excludes interests not directly 
related with work. He was especially 
devoted to his family and contributed 
much of his time to community activi- 
ties and to his church (Quaker). 

As a person, he was friendly, gentle 
and highly sensitive to the sensitivities 
and needs of others. He recognized and 
appreciated human dignity in all 
classes of agricultural workers. He was 
intelligent and scholarly (a Phi Beta 
Kappa graduate of Rutgers in 1921) but 
he had the facihty to explain scientific 
concepts to farmers in simple, clearly 
understandable terms. 

CHARLIE'S many worthy and 
significant accomplishments justify 
great pride. By his own evaluation, the 
achievement of which he was most 
proud is the rearing of a wonderful 
family. With his faithful and inspiring 
wife, Irene, three children were brought 
up in a home environment where car- 
ing for each other and abiding by 
Quaker ideals prevailed. 

Charles, the eldest, has had a distin- 
guished career as a physician and 
served on the staff of the world famous 
Mayo Clinic. David, the second born, 
has been an educator and a successful 
businessman. Margaret, the youngest. 



is a mathematician and sociologist. 

Margaret writes to tell that her 
father's influence is still strong and 
has been passed on to the next genera- 



tion. Just how strong can be seen by 
the fact that three of Charlie Doehlert's 
grandchildren — yes, three — have 
become horticulturists. 




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CRANBERRIES August 1989 Page 17 



Marketing Committee Invites 
Cranberry Growers to i\/leeting 





DAVID FARRIMOND, Cranberry Marketing Committee 
general manager, is busy these days with details concerning 
the committee's summer meeting. 

(CRANBERRIES photo by Carolyn Gilmore) 



By CAROLYN GILMORE 

Growers should attend the 
summer meeting of the Cranberry 
Marketing Committee and famil- 
iarize themselves with the 
amendment process, says David 
Farrimond, CMC general manager. 

At this writing, the session was 
slated for Aug. 24 in Madison, Wise. 

"The committee continues to work 
toward holding hearings on pro- 
posed amendments of the market- 
ing order, including conversion to 
a rolling base concept," said 
Farrimond. 

The amendment process was 
initiated five years ago to change 
the way base quantity is assigned. 

The Cranberry Marketing 
Committee, which represents the 
growing states, administers the 

Page 18 CRANBERRIES August 1989 



provisions of the marketing order. 

"We are seeking to open up the 
order a little," Farrimond said. 

Under new changes proposed for 
the order, restrictive details con- 
cerning assignment of base quan- 
tity would be removed from the 
order and become part of the rule 
making process. This would give 
the committee more latitude in 
choosing how a rolling base quan- 
tity would be assigned. 

The committee could then opt to 
assign base quantity according to 
each grower's best average four out 
of the past six years. Or it could 
change the formula to another 
average, such as the best three out 
of the past five years or the highest 
six of the past seven years, Farri- 
mond explained. 



Also on the agenda for the August 
meeting is confirmation of the 
estimates for the 1989 crop. At the 
March meeting, held in Philadel- 
phia, the committee predicted a 
4,015,000 barrel crop. 

"The committee has been amaz- 
ingly accurate in these long range 
predictions in the past," Farrimond 
said. 

Also to be examined is the handler 
inventory report summary, supply 
and demand estimates, the annual 
budget and the per barrel assess 
ment rate. 

The committee will be welcom 
ing a new alternate public member, 
Mary L. Petrie, program analyst 
for USDA-APHIS Biotechnology 
Permit Unit, Hyattasville, Md. 

Cranberry Merketing Committeei 
members are: Marshall Severance, 
chairman; Robert Christiansen, 



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Joseph Darlington; Charles Thomp- 
son; Martin Potter, and Rita Wood, 
public member. 

Alternates are Robert Hiller, 
Stephen V. Lee III, Alvan Brick, 
Mary Brazeau Brown, Ray Habel- 
man Jr., Frank Glenn III. USDA 
field representatives assigned to 
the order are Patty Petrella and 
Jackie Schlatter. 

Phone numbers for the Cranberry 
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CRANBERRIES August 1989 Page 19 



Protect Your Records 
Against Disaster 



By JOSEPH ARKIN 

Carelessness and lack of foresight by 
owners and managers are all too com- 
mon in the handling of business records. 

Could your firm survive if all of your 
financial, legal and operating records 
were lost forever? 

Your answer has to be a resounding 
NO! Yet important and irreplaceable 
documents are destroyed each day 
through fire, storm, flood, tornado and 
other disasters. This is because most 
regular records are vulnerable to loss 
and destruction. 

Managers of disaster-struck firms 
usually seek to reconstruct once 
thriving businesses by asking banks, 
the Red Cross, the Small Business 
Administration or other governmental 
lending agencies for financial help. 
This sought after aid is often lost 
because figures are not available to 
substantiate the loss nor can any 
figures be submitted to accurately 
determine what help was needed and 
could be prudently furnished. 

There are several important aspects 
to consider with respect to the loss of 
operating records. The loss claim filed 
as a result of physical damages to your 
business premises must be 
prepared. Insurance investigators and 
claims agents are sticklers for detail 
and accuracy. If all current records are 
destroyed, there is extreme difficulty in 
ascertaining the true extent of the loss, 
and, more often than not, compromise 
settlements cause great financial loss 
to the insured. 

Next are records that involve various 
taxing authorities. Business firms are 
required by law to retain (for specified 
periods of time) copies of social secur- 
ity, state unemployment, sales and 
excise tax records, substantiation of 
business expenses, depreciation sche- 
dules, and related income and expense 
records. 

In addition, employees may require 
your testimony or other proof of their 
earnings or absence from work. 

Federal and state examiners will want 
to exercise their right to check your 
payroll records to see if you have 
complied with minimum wage require- 
ments and payment for overtime pay. 

FJevenue agents have the right to 
Page 20 CRANBP:RRIE:S August 1989 



strike out your claim for depreciation 
unless you can show records substan- 
tiating original purchase — all of which 
may have been five, ten or more years 
in the accumulation. 

K your tax returns are questioned 
and the treasury agent finds upon 
inspection that you haven't appro- 
priate records to justify what you claim, 
you are told both orally and by letter to 
keep permanent books of account plus 
the following original records: invoi- 
ces, bills, vouchers, cash register tapes 
and receipts. These items, therefore, 
should be added to your list of records 
which should be protected against 
disaster. 

In fact, if a followup investigation 
shows that a businessman has con- 
sistently failed to maintain proper 
records, the Internal Revenue Service 
may hail him into court on the charge 
of willful negligence. The penalty for 
this misdemeanor is a fine of $10,000 or 
one year's imprisonment, or both, plus 
the court costs. 

If you want to take the full deduction 
for unusual expenses, such as enter- 
tainment and travel which are incurred 
on behalf of your firm, they should be 



fully documented to show that they are 
both accurate and allowable. These 
records, therefore, have lasting value. 

Business records are also important 
for the restoration of any business. 
Copies of contracts, bids, proposals, 
correspondence, etc., are all essential 
to stabilize future dealings with cus- 
tomers and suppliers. 

Of prime concern, too, are records of 
your receivables and payables. The 
Mosler Safe Co., in its advertisements 
for fire retardant safes and storage 
cabinets, claims that the majority of 
firms losing their business records never 
repoen their doors. 

This is the problem. How can small 
business firms with moderate finan- 
cial resources protect themselves 
against the loss of all or a substantia] 
part of their records? 

The starting place is to take stock oi 
the situation. Valuable papers which 
are used infrequently can be placed in £ 
safe deposit vault (in a bank or othei 
institution offering storage facilities 
where they will be adequately protectee 
from fire, wind and flood damage. Sucl 
vaults are available for rent in mos 
cities; the cost is low when compared t( 




in 
Do: 

li-i 

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llle 



the potential loss. 

These items can be kept on the pre- 
mises if you provide suitable storage 
facilities offering protection against 
fire and water damage to the nth degree. 

Current records of accoimts payable 
and receivables should be reproduced 
regularly and preserved in a safe place. 
Similar precautions should be taken 
for sets of tracings, blueprints, draw- 
ings, important specifications, docu- 
ments and patents, as well as for sets of 
models and prototype mechanisms. 
Special care should be taken of items 
for which it is not feasible to make and 
store a duplicate. Insurance policies 
and related data also deserve special 
care. 

THE SETTLING of claims can be greatly 
accelerated when adequate information is 
available. Then, too, if a dispute arises 
between the businessman and the insurance 
company, proof of loss through accurate 
documentary evidence may save thousands 
of dollars for the insured. 

Remember, however, that such safety 
measures are worth very little if the material 
you safeguard is out of date. Unless all 
documents are maintained on a reasonably 
current basis or have a long-term value, you 
are missing the point of the whole procedure. 

After assembling the material (old and 
current) that you desire to be protected, 
contact a warehouse, bank or other safe- 
keeping institution and describe your space 
needs. They'll quote prices for the bulk stor- 
age of records. 

When you have satisfied yourself, in con- 
currence with your chief assistants, that 
what has to be protected has been ade- 
quately provided for, set up a system to keep 
them current. You must have a plan to keep 
copying records and sending them away for 
safe storage. 

What about microfilm? You can use 
microfilming in one of three ways: (1) have 
it done on contract; (2) do it yourself with 
rented equipment; (3) do it internally with 
purchased equipment. The main deciding 
factors are cost, volume of work and control 
requirements. 

The great advantage of microfilm is space 
saving. This can be very important if the 
protected storage space you plan to use is 
relatively expensive. Obviously, when 
reduced to microfilm, a great many docu- 
ments can be fitted into the size of an ordi- 
nary desk drawer. If, however, you can get 
well-protected storage space at relatively 
low cost, be very careful to compare the 
cost of storing duplicate, full-sized docu- 
ments with the cost of microfilming. The 
National Records Management Council 
daims that you can store full-sized records 
for several years at less expense than the 
nitial cost of microfilming. 

Don 't overlook the role of your accountant 
n helping you to prove claims for loss and to 
lelp you in the reconstruction of any records 
hat are destroyed by a catastrophe. 

In this respect, you will do yourself a val- 
lable service if you have an accountanton a 



regular monthly basis. Insist upon record 
keeping involving a general ledger and 
supporting journals. Accept nothing less. In 
this fashion , the monthly trial balance taken 
at each visit serves as a cutoff point to 
reconstruct what has happened during the 
period of the records' destruction. 

Here is how a system of utilizing your 
accountant's monthly visit might work: 

(1) Your accountant calls, say, on the 18th 
of a particular month and completes his 
write-up or audit of your books to the last 
day of the previous month. He takes a trial 
balance (which provides cumulative sales, 
purchases and other pertinent figures), list 
of accounts payable and accounts receiva- 



ble and other schedules. 

(2) Each day's billing is prepared so that 
there is one extra copy of each sales invoice 
for mailing or other transmittal) to another 
location — your home, your accountant's 
office, etc. 

(3) A list of receipts is maintained and 
kept off your premises. 

Now suppose your office records were des- 
troyed on the 20th of the month. It would 
take but little time for your accountant to 
start from the records he obtained on the 
18th for the last day of the previous month, 
and add on billing from the 1st to the 20th, 
subtract remittances, and come up with cur- 
rent accounts receivable balances. The same 



Financial Strength. . . 

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The Jackson County Bank 
has supported agriculture in the 
area for more than 1 1 years. 

We recognize the importance 
of the cranberry industry and are 
pleased to provide financial ser- 
vices for all your banking needs. 



We're large enough to serve 
you and yet w/e offer personal- 
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CRANBERRIES August 1989 Pagt 21 



system can be used for accounts payable. 

Your accountant's work sheets and his 
office files will contain pertinent informa- 
tion about your operations. Also, his tax 
files will contain valuable supporting sche- 
dules to substantiate purchases of fixed 
assets subject to depreciation and similar 
information. 

YOU can also purchase a type of policy 
which has been tailored to protect you in 
case of record loss or damage. Your insu- 
rance agent can check with casualty insu- 
rance companies to locate low cost coverage 
for a policy called "valuable paper insu- 
rance." Its cost is at a rate slightly in excess 
of the regular fire insurance rate, but you 
need only insure the valuable papers for 
that amount which you believe would com- 
pensate you adquately for their loss. 

Valuable papers (exclusive of cash or 
securities) can be insured against "all risks" 
on: (a) a blanket basis with the amount of 
insurance purchased available to meet the 
expenses of reconstructing the missing, 
damaged or destroyed records; (b) a sche- 
duled basis with specific dollar amount(s) 
assigned to the items insured (this will be 
the amount paid in case of loss); and (c) a 
combination of the two foregoing methods. 

Exactly what does a valuable paper insu- 
rance policy cover? The insurance company 
will pay you for the costs (investigation, 
redevelopment, research, labor, etc.) of 
reproducing records which have been 
destroyed, demiaged or lost. Where repro- 
duction is not possible, payment will be 
made for the agreed value as specifically 
listed in the schedule. It should also be noted 
that while an insurance company could 
replace scheduled items at its option, this is 
rarely done. The insurance company could, 
however, exercise its privilege if a scheduled 
amount of insurance turned out to be exces- 
sive and if the item(s) could somehow be 
reproduced. 

The questions and ramifications of this 
area of coverage should be discussed with 
the insurance company's representative in 
advance. 

Some points to be taken into considera- 
tion concerning a valuable papers policy 
are: 

If any of your records are of such a nature 
that they cannot be replaced or reproduced, 
be sure to include them under the "specified 
schedule" of items rather than under the 
blanket policy. Don't assume a false sense 
of security from the fact that many of your 
records cannot be converted into cash. The 
destruction of valuable papers can cause a 
long period of delay in getting back into 
business, if ever. 

There are some who claim that the des- 
truction of records is sometimes covered by 
"business interruption" clauses in your fire 
policies. Because opinions differ on this sub- 
ject, it is suggested that you have your insu- 
rance agent verify the protection provided 
under the terms of your present fire insu- 
rance policy and business interruption rider. 

THE threat and risk of disaster exist 
whether you forget them or not. You seldom , 
if ever, get all your affairs in perfect shape. 

Page 22 CRANBERRIES August 1989 



Furthermore, your business needs to have 
its important records protected more when 
the risks are not evident, and when affairs 
are not in "apple pie" order, than when they 
are. Procrastination increases the risks of 
loss and waste — and competitive disadvan- 
tages. 

"Putting off the start of a constructive 
program is a major reason for being caught 
short when misfortune occurs," says Edward 



J. Stewart of the Small Business Adminis- 
tration. "Intelligent plans and positive 
action are essential if you are to give your 
business a reasonable chance of survival 
and recovery. Just as you insure a home and 
personal property against loss, so also should 
you protect your business against disaster 
by safeguarding and insuring its vital 
records. The time to begin is now." 




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2323 Jackson Street 
Oshkosh, Wl 54901 



Serving Cranberry 
Growers in U.S.A. 
& Canada since 1984 

Over 20 years 
of Experience on 
Acid Soil Interaction 



K Ag Laboratory has 
run over 30,000 
cranberry soil and over 
17,500 cranberry vines 
tests since 1984, and 
gave fertilizer 
recommendations with 
great success. 



* Cranberry Soil Analysis 

* Cranberry Vine Analysis 

* Cranberry Water Analysis, 
Usage & Interpretation 

* Liquid & Dry Fertilizer 
Recommendation 

* Soil Problems & Consultation 

* Seminars 

* Cranberry Crop Monitoring 
Program, testing and 
monitoring nutrient status 
with 30 day intervals during 
the growing season. 

Highly computerized cranberry soil, tissue and water testing program in 
U.S.A. and Canada. 

For more intormation contact: Dr. Akhtar Khwaja, Ph.D. 

Certified Professional Soil Scientist 
Certified Professional Agronomist 
Phone Number 414-426-2220; Out of WI 1-800-356-6045; FAX 414-426-2664 



CRANBERRIES August 1989 Page 23 



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An Equal Opportunity Employer 



.3 




CRANBERRIES 

,.THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

UB K A l^ September 1989 - Vol. 53, No. 9 

f.UG23 89 
>H1V. Or H^SS. 




Cranberries & Conservation 
Biological Pest Controls 



Cranberryin( 



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EAU CLAIRE 
1700 Western Avenue 
Phone (715) 835-5157 



MADISON 
Highway 51 & Buckeye Rd. 
Phone (608) 222-4151 



GREEN BAY 
600 Liberty Street 
Phone (414) 435-6676 



SUPERIOR 

1213 Winter Street 
Phone (715) 392-2243 



ESCANABA 
430 N. Lincoln Street 
Phone (906) 786-6920 



MILWAUKEE 

11715 W. Sliver Spring Rd. 
Phone (414) 461-5440 



Page 2 CRANBERRIES September 1989 



CCCGA Study Concludes 



Cranberry Agriculture 
Enhances Environment 



By CAROLYN GILMORE 

Cranberry growers play a major 
role in keeping Massachusetts 
green and inhabited by wildlife. 

That's the main conclusion of a 
study undertaken by the environ- 
mental committee of the Cape Cod 
Cranberry Growers' Association. 

"Land owned by cranberry 
growers is important not only for 
agriculture but for other needs in 
our area," says Wayne Barnes, 
environmental committee chair- 
man. "We have a green belt of 
thousands of acres that buffers 
development, filters storm water 
runoff, serves as a wildlife refuge, 
helps control growth, cleans the air 



and is beautiful to see — all at no 
cost to the public." 

The committee's findings are the 
result of a year long project aimed 
at quantifying the amount of open 
space associated with the cranberry 
industry. 

Detailed surveys— backed up by 

COVER PHOTO 

HELEN NOLAN of Carver, 
Mass., won third prize in the 
harvest category for this dra- 
matic photo she entered in the 
Cape Cod Cranberry Growers' 
Association color photography 
contest. 



aerial mapping, measurements and 
tax assessor records — profile the 
contribution growers make to pres- 
ervation of land and wildlife 
habitats. 

The object of the study was to 
document for those who tax, regu- 
late and question the industry that 
there is more to growing cranber- 
ries than what appears between 
the ditches. 

The findings will soon be pub- 
lished in booklet form and distri- 
buted to government officials, 
environmentalists and others who 
affect the industry. 

The research showed that Mas- 
sachusetts cranberry growers own 











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CRANBERRIES September 1989 Page 3 



more than 61,000 acres of land, 
12,244 acres of which is producing 
cranberry bog. 

The average ratio of upland to 
bog is 4: 1 , or four acres of surround- 
ing land for every acre of cranberry 
vines. Much of this upland directly 
supports the cranberry bog system 
with reservoirs, watersheds and 
sand supplies. 

One byproduct of cranberry cul- 
tivation, according to the study, is 
the abundant supply of high qual- 
ity water in the region. In Ply- 
mouth County alone, more than 22 
percent of the 20,943 acres of sur- 
face water is created and main- 
tained by cranberry growers. 

Impoundments range in size from 
one-tenth of an acre water holes to 
large reservoirs. In some areas, 
colonial grist mill ponds that oth- 
erwise would have been lost to his- 
tory are serving as part of the 
cranberry bog system. A total of 45 
historic mill sites now operated as 
bog reservoirs have been located in 
Plymouth County. 

The committee compiled statis- 



tics for the surface area of water in 
bog reservoirs over 3 feet deep by 
town in Plymouth County. 

An informal growers' survey 
yielded a variety of wildlife obser- 
vations on cranberry lands. 

Among birds listed were osprey, 
bluebirds, turkey plus an assort- 
ment of songbirds and waterfowl 
species. Coyote, mink, white-tailed 
deer and red and gray fox were 
among mammals sighted. The rare 
Plymouth red-bellied turtle was 
spotted, along with the more com- 
mon reptile and amphibian species 
native to the area. 

Rare wildflowers and plants, such 
as the pink lady's slipper, the white 
fringed orchid, holly, and even the 
endangered state flower, the may- 
flower, were located on cranberry 
bog uplands. 

Open space consultant Linda 
Rinta endorsed the central conclu- 
sion of the CCCGA study with 
these words: 

"The destiny of land preserva- 
tion in Massachusetts is in the 



hands of the private landowners. 
The public owns very little open 
space and although communities 
make elaborate open space plans, 
they can little afford to buy more. 
Cranberry growers are indeed con- 
servers and preservers of land and 
water." 

An unrelated land use study made 
in Buzzard's Bay echoes a similar 
sentiment about open space and 
cranberry growing. 

Said Randy Bluffstone, a spo- 
kesperson for the Buzzard's Bay 
Economic Analysis and Environ- 
mental Issue study: 

"On the basis of our research 
findings, we consider it very posi- 
tive for cranberry growing to remain 
an important part of the economic 
landscape for southeastern Massa- 
chusetts. Public policy should be 
brought to bear to provide incen 
tives for growers to maintain 
unused space." 




[ vvv^^^''^^^^ ^^^wvvv^^wvvvvvvvvvvvv^^^^^^ 



K Ag Laboratories International, Inc. 

2323 Jackson Street 
Oshkosh, Wl 54901 



Serving Cranberry 
Growers in U.S.A. 
& Canada since 1984 

Over 20 years 
of Experience on 
Acid Soil Interaction 



K Ag Laboratory has 
run over 30,000 
cranberry soil and over 
17,500 cranberry vines 
tests since 1984, and 
gave fertilizer 
recommendations with 
great success. 



* Cranberry Soil Analysis 

* Cranberry Vine Analysis 

* Cranberry Water Analysis, 
Usage & Interpretation 

* Liquid & Dry Fertilizer 
Recommendation 

* Soil Problems & Consultation 

* Seminars 

* Cranberry Crop Monitoring 
Program, testing and 
monitoring nutrient status 
ivith 30 day intervals during 
the growing season. 

Highly computerized cranberry soil, tissue and water testing program in 
U.S.A. and Canada. 

For more information contact: Dr. Akhtar Khwaja, Ph.D. 

Certified Professional Soil Scientist 
Certified Professional Agronomist 
Phone Number 414-426-2220; Out of WI 1-800-356-6045; FAX 414-426-2664 



Page 4 CRANBERRIES September 1989 



Review of Experiments 
In Biological Control 



By DAVE SIMSER 

Cranberry pest control, as 
informed growers know, has been 
refined by the development of a 
program known as cranberry inte- 
grated pest management (IPM). 

Each season, growers who par- 
ticipate in this program are pro- 
vided with field information col- 
lected by trained personnel. Such 
information permits pest control 
decisions based upon careful obser- 
vations, intensive sampling and 
pest threshold levels. The net result 
is often a reduction in the frequency 
and amount of pesticide applica- 
tion, which saves a grower valua- 



ble time and money. 

In addition to selective chemical 
applications, however, a sound IPM 
strategy also utilizes nonchemical 
techniques to reduce pest numbers, 
whenever practically possible. 

Thus, pest control alternatives 
are investigated in an effort to 
decrease the amount of pesticides 
needed to protect the valuable 
harvest. If such experimental 
procedures merit further attention, 
they are subsequently field-tested 
and evaluated as a component of 
an actual cranberry operation. 

DURING 1987 and 1988, a grant 
from the Massachusetts Depart- 



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ment of Food and Agriculture 
permitted private researchers the 
opportunity to evaluate biological 
control against several cranberry 
insect pests. 

The concept of biological control 
includes the periodic release of 
beneficial, naturally occurring 
organisms (e.g., predatory nema- 
todes, parasitic wasps or flies and 
bacterial and fungal parasites of 
insects) against specific pests. When 
successful, this type of control can 
be integrated into an overall pest 
management strategy. Results from 
these field trials are now being 
evaluated and are summarized 
below. 

In 1988, a species of parasitic 
wasp (known as Trichogramma 
pretiosum) was released against 
the major pest, the cranberry 
fruitworm. Years ago, the eminent 
entomologist. Dr. Henry J. Frank- 
lin, had dociunented parasitism of 
fruitworm eggs by an unidentified 
species of this wasp. In the present 
trial, a commercial insectary was 
contacted, and several cooperating 
growers generously permitted use 
of their bogs. 

Two rates of parasite release were 
compared. Data were also collected 
at bogs managed by the IPM pro- 
gram and at "not managed" sites 
(bogs not currently under 
management). Releases were 
initiated when test bogs were cal- 
culated as being at fifty percent 
"out of bloom" and were continued 
at three or four day intervals 
through August. 

Berries were collected at regular 
intervals from all sites and exam- 
ined for fruitworm eggs, which were 
then categorized as hatched, 
unhatched or parasitized (evident 
by a blackened appearance). Thus, 
the number of parasitized or 
unparasitized fruitworm eggs 
present in bogs could be calculated 
throughout the season. 

Results were encouraging but did 
CRANBERRIES September 1989 Page 5 



not demonstrate practical fruit- 
worm control. Parasitism of eggs 
was estimated at 25-30%, which 
would not reduce a fruitworm pop- 
ulation to an acceptable level by 
today's standards. 

However, samples obtained from 
"not managed" bogs generally 
displayed a higher level of parasit- 
ism, perhaps due to the presence of 
native Tnchogramma wasps. Cur- 
iously, the wasps collected from 
these sites were identified as the 
same species as provided by the 
comercial insectary. 

Although this release trial did 
not generate satisfactory pest con- 
trol results, it did demonstrate that 
a segment of the fruitworm popula- 
tion could be removed by parasi- 
tism. Perhaps wasps could be 
released following the first cover 
spray after bloom, further reducing 
the pest population level without 
application of further insecticide. 
Continuation of this search is 
dependent upon additional funding. 

Another approach involved 
spraying organisms known as 
nematodes. This new and exciting 
product has been developed by sev- 



CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

SEND CORRESPONDENCE TO; 

P.O. BOX 249 

COBALT CT 06414 

(203) 342-4730 

Fax #: (203) 342-1977 

PUBLISHER & EDITOR: BOB TAYLOR 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: CAROLYN GILMORE 
(508) 763-5206 

ADVISORS & CORRESPONDENTS 

MASSACHUSETTS — Irving E Demoranville. 
Director, Cranberry Experiment Station 

NEW JERSEY — Pfiillip E Marucci, Cranberry & Blueberry 
Specialist, Buddtown, Elizabeth G Carpenter, Chatswonh, 

NOVA SCOTIA — Robert A Murray, Honicultunst. Berry 
Crops, Research Station, Truro 

OREGON — Arthur Poole. Coos County Extension Agent, 
Coquille 

WASHINGTON — Azmi Y Shawa, Horticulturist and 
retired Director, Coastal Washington Research & Extension 
Unit, Long Beach 

WISCONSIN — Tod D Planer, Farm Management Agent, 
Wood County 

CRANBERRIES It publlahcd monthly by DIveriKled Periodi- 
cals. Wellwyn Drtve, Porlland CT 06480. Second class pos- 
Uge It paid at the Portland, Conn, Post Office, Price Is $15a 
year, $28 for two yaara, (2 a copy In the U.S.; $17 a year In 
Canada; $20 a year In all other countries. Back copies: $2.50, 
Including pottage. Copyright 1988 by Olvertltled Periodicals. 

ISSN: 0011-0787 

Poslmaater. send Form 3749 to: 

CRANBERRIES 

P.O. BOX 249 

COBALT CT 06414 



eral research firms in North Amer- 
ica and Australia and has recently 
been marketed for use in cranberry 
pest management. Unlike pestifer- 
ous nematodes which attack plants, 
beneficial nematodes attack a wide 
range of insect species. 

In the 1987 and 1988 trials, nem- 
atodes were applied via ground 
spray equipment to a bog infested 
by larvae of the strawberry root 
weevil, a major below-ground pest. 
Weevil larvae were sampled and 
counted immediately before and at 
five days following nematode 
application. Results were favora- 
ble: the number of weevil larvae 
were reduced by nematodes, com- 
pared to counts of larvae made in 
untreated sites. 

Further trials are being conducted 
against other serious below-ground 
pest species, such as cranberry root 
grub and white grub. 

A third approach included release 
of predatory mites against the 
secondary, but important, pest, the 
southern red mite. Predaceous mites 
are currently being used to control 
a wide range of pestiferous mites in 
several cropping systems, includ- 
ing strawberries. In cranberries, 
field trials were hindered by lack of 
adequate test sites, but laboratory 
trials provided dramatic results. 

Southern red mites were placed 
in petri dishes. Species of preda- 
tory mites were added to the dishes 
at a ratio of one predator to four 
pests. Examination of the dishes 
24 hours later demonstrated that 
southern red mite was attacked by 
four species of predatory mites. 



Live pest mites were only found 
in control group dishes — those 
without predatory mites. The next \ 
phase will be directed against 
southern red mite infestations on 
bogs. 

THE RECENT surge in public 
concern about pesticide residues 
present on fresh firuit has served us 
notice that use of pesticides is being 
scrutinized by the consumer as well 
as by regulatory agencies. 

Indeed, cultivation of cranberries 
has been targeted as a potential 
source of environmental contami- 
nation by numerous groups and 
individuals. Growers have been 
questioned by concerned citizens 
who fear permanent pollution of 
fresh water supplies or accidental 
exposure to toxic chemicals. More 
consumers are becoming cautious 
about the quality of their food and 



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Page 6 CRANBERRIES September 1989 



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NOTECARDS 



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To Order CI^NBERRY SERIES #1 - Send Check or Money 
Order To: 

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Rt.2 McFarland Drive 

Manitowish Waters, Wl 54545 

715-543-2975 

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Page 8 CRANBERRIES September 1989 



are seeking assurance that produce 
is clean and pesticide-free. 

Development of practical alter- 
natives to pesticides is thus benefi- 
cial not only to the environment, 
but also to the long-term health of 
the industry. 

However, the various pests 
themselves may actually be the 
chief reason to consider pesticide 
alternatives. 

The phenomenon of pesticide 
resistance is well documented and 
particularly troubling. Research 
has demonstrated quite conclusively 
that insect pests can evolve resist- 
ance to a range of pesticides, thus 
creating an urgent need for alter- 
native solutions. 

Use of biological control agents 
could provide such an alternative. 

(Dave Simser is a researcher for 
New Alchemy Institute of 
Falmouth, Mass., a nonprofit 
research and educational institute.) 





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CRANBERRIES September 1989 Page 9 



Editor's Note: Associate Editor Carolyn Gilmore came across the section below^ 
while perusing "Facts for Farmers: A Variety of Rich Materials for All Landowners 
About Domestic Animals and Domestic Economy, Farm Buildings, Gardens, 
Orchards and Vineyards and All Farms Crops, Tools, Fences, Fertilization, Drain- 
ing and Irrigation." This book with the longwinded subtitle was edited by Solon 
Robinson and published in 1871. 

700. Cranberries as a Field Crop.— We have already said that cranberries may be grown in 
the garden, and we now say they may and should be grown as a farm crop upon hundreds of 
farms that have tracts particularly well adapted to their growth. Upon this subject, Noble Hill, 
of Caton, Steuben County, N.Y., writes as follows: 

"That the cranberry is a favorite luxury, is abundantly proved by the high price which a 
good, and not unfrequently an inferior, article will command in the markets. That it is easy of 
cultivation , and that there is an abundance of land now lying waste which is j ust adapted to its 
growth, is perhaps not so generally known. If the thousands of acres of swamps, of a peat soil, 
within the bounds of the single State of New York, were to be converted, as they certainly might 
be, into cranberry meadows, the fruit would never be quoted at $14 or $15 per barrel in New 
York City. 



"The following is submitted as the result 
of several years of observation and expe- 
rience in the cultivation of the cranberry. 
The subject of my experience is a swamp of 
several acres, and of a peat soil. Formerly it 
was covered with small brush, moss, grass, 
and weeds; no large timber being found on 
it, owing to the fact that it was submerged 
during a great portion of the year. On the 
borders of this swamp a few cranberry 
vines, indigenous to the soil, were to be 
found. By a series of open ditches leading 
across it and through a bank at its margin, I 
was enabled to remove the superabundant 
surface water. This done, cranberry vines 
began to make their appearance in different 
portions of the swamp, but more plentifully 
in the central portion, from which they 
began to spread over the land at a rapid 
rate. In their progress, however, they 
encountered an enemy in the shape of the 
brush , which not only retarded their growth 
and prevented the full development of their 
prolific qualities, but in some places entirely 
excluded them. Hence it occurred to me that 
an advantage would be gained by thoroughly 
subduing the soil previous to its occupancy 
by the cranberry. To this work I then 
addressed myself, accomplishing it with the 
plow on the borders, where the land had 
become sufficiently dry to render that mode 
practicable, and with a spade in other por- 
tions on which a team could not be driven. 
As done by a spade, the work consists in 
paring off the surface and throwing the 
result into heaps, which, when rotted, answer 
a good purpose as manure for fruit trees. 
The clean surface thus exposed should be 
spaded to the depth of two or three inches, 
when the process of transplanting may be 
performed. If, however, the transplanting 
be deferred until the following spring, and 
the soil be occasionally stirred during 
summer with a hand harrow, the plants will 



thrive the more rapidly. They should be set 
closely as they will the sooner cover the 
ground to the exclusion of weeds, from 
which, if kept free for two or three years, 
they will thenceforth need but little, if any, 
attention. In soil thus prepared, I have 
transplanted the last of May, and have 
picked fine clusters of berries the ensuing 
fall . In two or three years a fine crop may be 
expected, and thenceforth, so far as my 
experience goes, will be annually realized. 
To insure large crops, the soil during summer 
should be well saturated with water, and if 
flowed in the spring, all the better. This I 
accomplish, as far as possible, by a proper 
adjustment of my drains, opening and clos- 
ing them according to the variations of the 



weather from wet to dry. As to trsmsplant- 
ing, there is no difficulty whatever. If an 
equal number of cabbage and of cranberry 
plants be set, more failures would be found 
among the former than among the latter. A 
cranberry plant a yard long, set in a mellow 
peat soil in a wet season, will take root at 
every point of full contact with the soil." 

It is a pity that we can not convince all the 
owners of such swamps as Mr. Hill des- 
cribes that they can grow just as good ber- 
ries as he does. There are many such places 
within a few miles of this city that are now 
pests to the owners, that would be profitable 
ever after if once set in cranberry vines. 

The cranberry has been very much 
improved — as much so as any other fruit. II 



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Page 10 CRANBERRIES September 1989 



do not know of any fi^t that offers greater 
inducements to experiment with than the 
cranberry in seedlings, since it has already 
shown such good results. If cranberry seed, 
or any other hard seed, is difficult to vege- 
tate, it may be scalded with boiling water. 

There is no doubt that cranberries can be 
grown upon any soil that has water a few 
inches below the surface. Upon tolerably 
dry upland cranberries have been grown to 
advantage, and they will grow in very bare 
sand if either naturally or artificially 
watered. 

Considering the high price which cran- 
berries always bring in market, and the 
cheap cost at which they can be produced, it 
is strange that more shrewd farmers have 
not gone into the speculation. A good deal of 
attention has been given to the cultivation 
of cranberries in Burlington County, New 
Jersey, about 150 acres having been planted 
in one season. Of this, one farmer named 
Chetwood has set out 25 acres; another, 
named G. Growdy, 17 acres; and Mr. Allen, 
10 acres. 

Upon Cape Cod, where cranberry culture 
has been carried to the greatest extent, 
swampy land that was a few years ago con- 
sidered utterly worthless, has now a salable 
value of $800 to $1,200 an acre; and some of 
the owners of such land have found it a good 
investment of time and money to expend 
from $200 to $1,000 upon an acre to bring it 
into a condition fit to be planted with 
cranberries. 

All over this country there are numerous 
bogs which might easily be converted into 



fruitful cranberry gardens. 

In view of these facts we make this perti- 
nent inquiry to every farmer in all the 
Northern States, where cranberries are 
found growing wild: "Are there no swamps, 
or wet valleys, or brook borders upon your 
farm, now, perhaps, unsightly spots— wet 
swamps in winter, and dry and pestiferous 
in summer? If you have such, plant them 
with cranberry-vines, and tend them one or 
two years till the vines get well set, and then 
they will tend themselves, and produce you 
on the average more bushels of fruit per acre 
than you get of potatoes; and it is not much 
more work to gather it than it is the tubers, 
and generally speaking, you can sell a 
bushel of cranberries for the price of five 



bushels of potatoes." 

Truth, it is said, lies at the bottom of a 
well. The well that holds the truth in rela- 
tion to cranberry culture and its profitable- 
ness upon many of the worthless bogs that 
render farms imsalable, and detract it from 
the value of the upland, must be a remarka- 
bly deep one, or it would have been dug out 
before now, and made to shine in all the rich 
crimson luster of a field of this ripe fruit. 

701. Varieties of Cranberries and How 
to Grow Them. — The American cranberry 
(Oxycoccus macrocarpus) is divided by 
growers and dealers into three varieties — 
the Bell, the Bugle, and the Cherry. It will 
grow on almost any soil where the water is 
not more than a foot from the surface, yet 



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CRANBERRIES September 1989 Page 11 



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Page 12 CRANBERRIES September 1989 



experience has proved that the soil best 
adapted to them is nothing more nor less 
than the plain beach sand, entirely free 
from any matter, either animal or vegeta- 
ble; in fact, this berry may be said to Uve 
entirely on sand and water. 

Peat is found to be well adapted to this 
berry, but requires some care in preparing, 
owing to its liability to bake and crack in hot 
weather; this may be obviated, however, by 
taking off the turf and grass, leaving the 
surface exposed to the action of the weather 
for a year, after which it becomes light and 
porous, and fit for the reception of the vines. 

Cutting-planting has been adopted by 
some as the most economical plan, and as 
the plant sends out long runners, sometimes 
to the length of five or six feet, it is self- 
evident that the first cost of cuttings must 
be small. The cutting should be about six or 
eight inches long, and should be planted by 
thrusting the middle into the earth with a 
dibble, permitting a few inches of each end 
to project, so that when it takes root you 
have two plants instead of one. 

Another plan of propagating by cuttings 
is to cut the vines into pieces about two 
inches in length, for which purpose a com- 
mon hay-cutter may be used, and sowing 
them broadcast on ground prepared for 
them, and then harrowing them in as you 
would wheat or rye. It is preferable to plant 
them in drills at such distances as will per- 
mit cultivation with the plow for the first 
two years. These small cuttings will soon 
take root from the point where branches join 
the stem, and will send out runners the 




second year after planting. 

Planting separate vines has been found to 
be the most effectual plan, and although it 
consumes more time, and is perhaps attended 
with rather more expense, yet from the 
absence of weeds and the fine chance for the 
vines to spread, the cultivator finds himself 
amply repaid for the increased outlay. 

The distances of planting must be regu- 
lated by the nature of the soil; if liable to 
weeds, you must give yourself room to work 



among the vines; but if you are planting on 
plain beach sand, the closer your plants are 
the better, for the great object in forming a 
cranberry-yard is to have the entire surface 
covered by a thick mat of vines as soon as 
possible. 

The time of planting generally preferred 
is in the spring, as in this case the roots are 
not so liable to be thrown out by the winter 
frosts — say from the 15th of April to the Ist 
of June. 



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Office: 295-2731 
Evening: 763-8956 
Fax:(508)291-1417 



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CRANBERRIES September 1989 Page 13 



As a general rule among farmers, they 
will be able to select some spot of meadow 
land which is low and moist, free from stag- 
nant water, tind somewhat sheltered from 
storms, as this may be considered the best 
location. 

A position where the yard can be flooded 
in winter is very desirable, as the vines, 
when exposed to very severe weather, are 
liable to be winter-killed down as low as the 
roots, which throws them back in bearing 
for a year; besides which, it is sometimes 
desirable to flood them during the fruiting 
season to prevent the attack of the worm, 
which in some localities is quite destructive. 

An acre of vines, properly cultivated and 
well matted, will produce at least two 
hundred and fifty bushels of berries; in 
some instances a yield of four hundred 
bushels per acre has been obtained, but this 
is above the average, and may not be relied 
upon. 

Two hundred and fifty bushels of berries, 
at the low price of three dollars per bushel, 
gives us seven hundred £md fifty dollars as 
the product of one acre. Vines for a new 
plantation should be procured from mea- 
dows which have borne well, and of good 
fruit, as the best way of knowing good 
bearers. 

If the yard can be flowed, though not 
absolutely necessary, the water may remain 
on all winter, and be let off in March. It 
should be let on about the 20th to the 25th of 
May, and again the 1st of June, not exceed- 
ing thirty-six hours. After this, it is not 
needful. Blossoms are injured by the water 
remaining on too long; the object of flooding 
is to destroy the insects. After this second 
flowing, there is little to fear from them. 

A Cape Cod cranberry grower gives some 
useful advice to persons disposed to embtirk 
in cranberry culture. He says: 

"Suppose that those who are favored with 
some of the natural facilities desire to do 
something with cranberries, it would be 
folly to expend much money in clearing up a 
swamp. The best thing to be done is to study 
the nature of the soil in which the vine is 
flourishing, and then to prepare a small 
patch — say two or three rods — and plant the 
vines there, and bestowing some trifling 



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Page 14 CRANBERRIES September 1989 



degree of care upon them, by way of weeding 
occasionally, you will see by this experi- 
ment whether it will do for you to proceed 
much farther in their cultivation. If you fail, 
that failure will most likely suggest to you 
the remedy. Great mistakes are made in 
anticipating from planting waste lands with 
cranberry vines, that they are about to 
realize two hundred per cent. It will do very 
well for an experienced man to make large 
yards, and with certainty of success, but it 
will not do for a man who knows nothing 
about the cranberry and its culture to go 
rashly to work. You will prevent future 
expense and galling disappointment by 
making your first trial on rather a small 
scale. 

"The cranberry vine can be naturalized to 
those regions of country in which it is not 
indigenous. The Bugle cranberry is gener- 
ally found to throw its runners from the 
swamp toward the upland. The runner 
receives its moisture from the roots of the 
vine which rest in thedamp soil. Now, if you 
will take these runners and plant them 
where there is some moisture, in an upland 
soil, and stir it frequently during the hot 
months of summer, they will live through 
the apparent drouth. Two years hence take 
the young vines and carefully plant them, 
and you will find that you have done much 
toward naturalizing the vine even to a 
situation where there can not be any over- 
flowing. Many persons have planted on the 
upland with vines from the swamp, and the 
transition from abundant moisture to a 
comparatively dry situation has been too 
sudden, and the vines have subsequently 
died. Those who try the upland should get 
the vines which have been naturalized to a 
dry soil, or it will require immense trouble 
and some years to do anything to advan- 
tage. It will be well for those who intend to 
try the cranberry vine on a comparatively 
high and dry situation, to remember that 



the fruit produced is not so large, nor yet are 
the quantities equal to those which are 
yielded in more favorable locations, where 
there is either peat, beach-sand, or fine gra- 
velly loam, and the ability to flow in winter. 
I believe that the time will come when the 
commercial value of the cranberry will be 
better understood, and when farmers in all 
parts of the country will feel it to be their 
interest to cultivate a patch of this fruit, and 
when its requirements will be better under- 
stood than at present, and when it will be a 
source of profit to those who think it worth 
their while to raise the berry. 

"A short time since I saw a swamp which 
was formerly so covered over with brakes, 
huckleberry-bushes and briers, that it was 
of no use to the owner until he paid some 
attention to the subject of cranberry cultiva- 
tion, and cleared the swamp, which he 
found to have a peaty bottom. The ground 
then planted over with vines, and the prop- 
erty, including clearing, vines, and plant- 
ing, cost him $300, but I was informed by the 
proprietor that he had muck from the swamp 
which he valued at $150. The first year he 
had off this one acre and a half one or two 
bushels; the second, twelve bushels; and the 
next year, seventy-three bushels, which were 
sold at $4 per bushel. If the yard cost him 
$300, he nearly realized in the third year 
subsequently to its being made, the sum of 
money he first expended upon it." 

Our final advice, to all who desire to plant 
cranberries to any extent, is to hire some 
experienced person to do the work, and give 
instructions for the future care of the yard, 
according to the circumstances of its 
location. 

High bush, or tree-cranberry, is the com- 
mon name of a berry sometimes sold under 
the recommendation of being equal to the 
fruit we have been describing. It belongs to 
a very different order of plants from the 
cranberry — the real oxycoccus. 



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CRANBERRIES September 1989 Page 15 



The only use of it is as an ornamental 
shrub. No housewife will try to use it but 
once in the place of the true cranberry. The 
fi^t is fdmost wholly a hard, long seed, 
scarcely covered with pulp, and when cooked 
with much sugar, though resembling the 
true cranberry, sadly mocks the taste. 

702. How to Cook Cranberries is an 
important question. They are sour, acrid, 
unpalatable, and unwholesome in a raw 
state, and but little better as they are usu- 
ally cooked. We have often seen them hast- 
ily scalded, sweetened, and brought to the 
table floating in their juice, not one half of 
them cooked enough to burst the skin. Bah! 
what food! But how different when cooked! 
Put them, with only water enough to pre- 
vent burning, in a tinned sauce-pan, and 
stew until by stirring the whole becomes a 
homogenous mass, with no semblance of 
whole berries, and then add clarified sirup, 
previously prepared, and stir a few minutes 
while boiling. When cold, you have delicious 
cranberry jelly. 




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111 Grant St. 
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Tel. (608) 378-4794 
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790 Federal Furnace Rd. 

Plymouth, MA 02360 

Tel. (508) 746-6048 



Page 16 CRANBERRIES September 1989 



REGIONAL 
NOTES 

MASSACHUSETTS 

By IRVING E. DEMORANVILLE 

Reports and observations indicate that our 
bogs overwintered well. 

No reports of winterkill — we were lucky as 
many bogs did not have water for winter 
flood— and some reports of leaf drop— not 
from oxygen deficiency but various types of 
stress. 

Root rot is still with us, but generally under 
control. 

Insect population was generally light, exept 
for tip worm. Also, there were more reports of 
grubs showing up. 

A heavy bloom appeared to be setting well. 

Bees were not the problem that was 
expected, thanks to the efforts of CCCGA, 
the Massachusetts Department of Agricul- 
ture and the Beekeepers Association. 

Quality could be weak but timely fungicide 
applications were very helpful. 

Considerable Fairy Ring showed up. We 
have not pinpointed a reason yet. 

Prospects appear very good to excellent at 
this time. 



Weather 



MASSACHUSETTS 

June was warm, averaging 2.0 degrees a 
day above normal. This was the eighth warm- 
est in ourrecords. The second week was cool 
and the last one-third warm. Night tempera- 
tures were much above normal. Maximum 
temperature was 88 degrees on the 23rd and 
minimum 52 degrees on the 30th. 

Rainfall totaled 3.25 inches or just normal. 
There were 1 5 days with measurable rain with 
1.16 inches on the 9th-10th as the greatest 
storm. There was nothing the last two weeks 
of the month. We are about 3/4 inch below 
normal for 1989 and are 2-2/3 inches ahead of 
1988. 



There was a total of seven days with frost 
warnings during the spring 1989 frost season: 
five in April, two in May and none in June. 

A very easy season. In fact, the only bad 
night was April 22 when sprinkler heads freez- 
ing was a common occurrence. 

Temperatures were from 9 to 16 degrees. 

I.E.D. 

WASTE MANAGEMENT IS 
SUBJECT OF SYMPOSIUM 

Solid/liquid separation processes in waste 
management and productivity enhancement 
is the theme of an international sjfmposiiun 
to be held at Battelle in Columbus, Ohio 
Dec. 5-7. 



Obituary 
Charles Broderick 

Cranberry grower, art gallery 
owner, museum director and orchid 
fancier, Charles Broderick of Jamaica 
Plain, Mass., died recently at age 87. 

He was a member of the Cape Cod 
Cranberry Growers' Association. 

Broderick and his late wife, Doris 
(Toye), operated Orchid Hill Farm 
from the mid-1940s until the 19608. 
Ten years ago he started Meadow 
Pond Farm in Carver, where he grew 
cranberries, Christmas trees, hollies 
and beech seedlings. 

The Brodericks also established the 
Broderick Gallery in Jamaica Plain, 
where they specialized in restoration 
and conservation of oil paintings and 
frames. 



Broderick was born in Dorchester 
and graduated from Suffolk Law 
School in 1927. 

He was director and curator of the 
Antique Auto Museum at Larz And- 
erson Park in Brookline from 1963 to 
1970. He also was an adviser to the 
Transporation Museum in Owl's Head, 
Maine, which was close to his summer 
home. 

Director and former president of the 
Jamaica Hills Association, he also 
was president of the Brookline Rotary 
Club in 1971-72 and a member of the 
Boston Flower Exchange. 

He leaves a daughter, Julia B. 
O'Brien of Roslindale; a son, Brian T. 
of Jamaica Plain, and two grand- 
daughters. 



*^^*^*^^*^*<^'^'^'^^****^*^*^^****-»^ 




CRANBERRIES September 1989 Page 17 



Success the Ocean Spray Way 



Co-op's VP Writes 

Marketing Chapter 

For USDA Yearboolc 



By CAROLYN GILMORE 

New product development! 

Ocean Spray has had universally 
acknowledged success at it. So when 
it came to having someone write a 
chapter on the subject for the 
USDA's 1988 Yearbook of Agricul- 
ture, it seemed quite natural that 
Tom Bullock, the cooperative's vice 
president of business operations, 
would be asked to perform the task. 

Bullock's article outlines the five 
steps Ocean Spray follows to 
introduce new products to the 
market. As he describes it, the pro- 
cess takes 18 months or more from 
conception to implementation. 

The five steps are: 1. exploratory; 
2. early development; 3. criteria 
measurement; 4. advanced devel- 
opment, and 5. test marketing. 
Throughout, strong advertising is 
emphasized. 

The cooperative believes in tak- 



CRANLAND 
SERVICES 

Cranberry Property 

Appraisals 

• ••••• 

Listings and Sales of 

Cranberry Properties. 

License # 68987 



Lawrence W. Pink 

Old Cordwood Path 

Duxbury, MA 02332 

(617)934-6076 



ing the product story directly to the 
customer early in the introduction 
of the product and often in the fol- 
lowup programs, writes Bullock. 

Ocean Spray claims that the 
marketing formula was successful 
with the nine juice products it 
introduced to the market from 
1981-87. 

"It takes a lot of time, energy and 
money to consistently introduce 
quality products in a competitive 
marketplace, but Ocean Spray has 
been doing it — and doing it well," 
Bullock concludes. "With sales of 
$735 miUion in fiscal 1987, Ocean 
Spray's success in the food and 
beverage industry cannot be 
ignored." 

The theme of the 1988 Yearbook 
of Agriculture is quality marketing. 

"This volume of the Yearbook of 



Agriculture should prove of help to 
the individuals and firms whose 
job it is to meet the changing 
demands of our buyers, innovating 
and modifying our high-quality raw 
materials to give people the types 
of products they want," writes 
Agriculture Secretary Richard E. 
Lyng in the foreword. 

A copy of the Yearbook of Agri- 
culture can be obtained from the 
Superintendent of Docimients, U.S. 
Government Printing Office, 
Washington, D.C. 20402 or by writ- 
ing your congressman. 

REMCO BECOMES ACCOR 

Remco Research & Development Inc. has 
changed its name to Accor Technology Inc. 
The address of the company — 251 
Independence Way, Cashmere, WA 98815 — 
remains the same. 



•y/r ■».-'- .-yrr t),^ 



J.A. JENKINS & SON CO. 

Grower Service 



MOWING (ALL TYPES) 
SANDING 



DITCHING 
WEED WIPING 



Serving Cape Cod 

227 Pine St., W. Barnstable, Ma. 02668 

Phone 362-6018 



Page 18 CRANBERRIES September 1989 



a3iA»j<aj>«5fri>ft5i«ffl^^ 



*i(, 



ABBOTT NAMES SCANLON 

Abbott Laboratories, which claims to be 
the world's largest producer of biological 
pesticides and plant growth regulators, has 
named Phil Scanlon as regional sales repre- 
sentative. Abbott is based in North Chi- 
cago, 111. 




Cranberry Originals 



T-ShIrt 

"CRANBERRIES 

North America's Native Fruit" 



An Original Botanical Design 
of Blossoms and Green & Ripe Cranberries 



by 



ifid^^f^i 



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Adult T-Shirt (Sizes S, M, L, XL) $12 

Adult XXL T-ShIrt $14 

Youth Size 14-16 T-Shirt $11 

Children's Sizes 4, 6-8, 10-12 $11 

Adult Sweatshirt (S, M, L, XL) $25 

Adult XXL Sweatshirt $28 

Youth 14-16 Sweatshirt $21 

Children's Sweatshirt (4,6-8, 10-12) $19 



Swnti Check or Money Order to: 
CRANBERRIES 

P.O. Box 249 
Cobalt, CT 06414 

Add $3.50 Shipping & Handling Charge 
For Canadian orders, add $8 



Name. . , 
Address . 
City . . . , 



. State . 



Zip. 



Red, White & Blue 

The viburnum bush: 

A cranberry sea 

under a crimson sky. 

As the fire crackles high 

'neath the hunter's moon, 

an eerie aura surrounds me. 

Listening to the peepers 

I see the shadow of a loon. 

I'm lulled to a false tranquility. 

For the season has come. 

There's much work to be done. 

This little berry is in big demand. 

Jellied and juiced, ornamented or canned; 

it takes more than passion to work this land. 

Though my back's been strained a hundred times 

in the crunch of the holiday season, 

and everyone thinks I'm mad . . . 

I've a happy life, full of sage reason. 

With a wink and a nod, I look to the bog 

and marvel at the wondrous witherod. 



B.A. Coleman 




WISCONSIN CRANBERRY 
HEADQUARTERS FOR 
SEVINXLR 



DEVRINOL 10G * EVITAL « GUTHION 
DIAZINON 14G • PARATHl'ON ♦ ETHREL 

Cole /Grower Service 

537 Atlas Ave., P.O. Box 721 1 , Madison, Wl 53707 
(608) 221-6204 or 1-800-362-8049 



CRANBERRIES September 1989 Page 19 




NO REHEARSAL needed for this easy-to-prepare buffet for a bride and groom-to-be. A gay menu of 
Berry Saucy Miniature Meatballs, to be served on bread croustades. Cranberry Charlotte Russe for 
dessert, and to toast. Cranberry Champagne Punch. 




Surely the wedding rehearsal party 
is one of the most delightful events of 
the many which take place before the 
bells chime on that happy day. Tradi- 
tionally, the groom's parents host this 
joyful occasion for the bridal couple 
and their attendants. 

Page 20 CRANBERRIES September 1989 



Whether the rehearsal takes place 
before lunch or dinner, this light and 
easy medley of cranberry recipes is a 
perfect choice because it can be pre- 
pared ahead of time, and will be ready 
to serve as soon as everyone arrives. 



Berry Saucy 

Miniature 

Meatballs 

(Serves 6 to 8) 

2 pounds ground beef 
1 pomid ground pork 
1 tablespoon salt 
y* teaspoon pepper 

3 eggs 

1 clove garlic, mashed 
1 small onion, chopped 
1 can (1 pound) jellied whole 

berry cranberry sauce 



1 cup chili sauce 
(1 12-ouncejar) 

2 tablespoons prepared mustard 
1 jar (5 ounces) cocktail 

onions, drained 



^ Gapen 

^^30 Realty 



112 Acres 
FOR SALE 

Corp. permit to develop 30 acres of 

beds. Some ditching completed. 

Lots of water. House needs work. 

Good potential. 

Ladysmlth, WI 

$69.900 

2141 8Lh Street South 
Wisconsin Rapids.Wisconsin 54494 

(715)423-6550 



i 



Croustades (below) or puff 
pastry shells 

In a large bowl, combine beef, pork, salt, 
pepper, eggs, garlic and chopped onion; mix 
until well blended. Shape mixture into V/2 
inch balls, place side-by-side in a single 
layer in a shallow baking pan. Bake in a 



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NIemI 

Electric 

Company 




Robert 
Niemi 

Electrical 
Contractors 



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• RESIDENTIAL 

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O^M 



Equipment, inc. 



381 West Grove St. (Rte. 28) 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

(508) 947-6299 

^KUBOTn 

Tractors, Excavators and 
Diesel Generators 



® 



pYOTE 

Wheel Loaders 
3/4 Yd -6 1/2 Yd 



mff] 



Screening Equipment 




preheated moderate oven (350° F) for 30 to 35 
minutes or until meatballs are brown and 
cooked. In a large skillet, heat cranberry 
sauce, chili sauce, mustard and cocktail 
onions until bubbly. With slotted spoon, add 
meatballs to sauce. Simmer until bubbly. 
Spoon into a chafing dish and keep warm 
over a warmer. Serve meatballs in bread 
croustades or in baked puff pastry shells. To 
make 8 croustades, trim all the crusts from 
two 1-pound loaves of unsliced white bread. 
Cut each loaf into 4 thick, crosswise slices. 
With a sharp knife, scoop out the center of 
each slice, leaving a shell '/2-inch thick. 
Brush shells with melted butter or marga- 
rine and place on a cookie sheet. Bake in a 
preheated hot oven (400° F) for 15 to 20 min- 



utes or until brown. 

Cranberry 

Charlotte 

Russe 

(Serves 6) 

24 double lady fingers 

2 cans (1 pound each) peach 

slices, drained 
1 cup (Vi pint) heavy cream, 

whipped 
1 teaspoon rum flavoring 
1 can (1 pound) jellied cranberry 

sauce, cut into Mz-inch cubes 



;i^\i^ii 



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R n.<. 



hri^9tion Supplies 

• 2" to 12" PVC Pipe with Fittings 

• Quick Couple Risers 

• Felker Aluminum Flumes & Culverts 

Replace old aluminum mains with government approved 4", 6" 
and 8 " polyethylene pipe buried just below bog surface. No insert 
fittings. Rent our butt fusion welder for a continuous main line. Beat 
the high cost of custom installation by renting our small 4-wfieel 
drive tractor with mole hole plow for buried laterals. 

STEARNS IRRIGATION, INC. 

790 Federal Furnace Rd. 

Plymouth MA 02360 

Tel. (508) 746-6048 



^^^^^^^^'^^^^^^^'^'^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^'^^'^^^^^^^^^^^'^^ 




CORPORATION 

OF NEW ENGLAND 



Industrial Suppliers To The Cranberry Industry 



kS 



Chain, Cable and Accessories 
Used for Making Mats 
I Types of Fasteners (BuIk & Packaged) 

Hand Tools Pumps 

Power Tools Motors 

Chennicals Abrasives 

Lubricants Cutting Tools 

Safety Equipment 




Richards Rd 
Plymouth Industrial Park 



747-0086 
Plymouth, MA 02360 




CRANBERRIES September 1989 Page 21 



Stand four lady fingers into each of 6 sherbet 
dishes. Spoon peaches into the bottom of the 
dishes. In a bowl mix cream, rum flavoring 
and cranberry sauce cubes gently until well 
blended. Spoon mixture on peaches in cen- 
ter of each sherbet dish. Chill until ready to 
serve. 

Cranberry 

Champagne 

Punch 

(Serves 10 to 12 - about 18 cups) 



^^NNBEI?/?^ 




COMPUTER, INC. 
CRANWARE 

• Growers 

• Handlers 

• Chemical Applicotions 

• Chemicol Resale 

(508) 747-3033 

P.O. Box 1037, Plymouth, MA 02360 



Clogged Suction Screen? 

This Screen 
'/ Stays Clean 






SURE-FLO 

Self-Cleaning 
Strainers 




capacities to 
3850 gpm 

patent no. 
4822486 



Save Time — eliminates 
the headache of manual 
screen scrubbing 

Save Money — maintains 
maximum pump efficiency 

For more information: 

Perfection Sprinkler Co. 

2077 S. State St. 

P.O. Box 1363 

Ann Arbor, Ml 48106 

313 761-5110 FAX 313 761-8659 




1 quart cranberry juice 

cocktail 
1 can (6 ounces) frozen 

concentrated orange juice, 

thawed and undiluted 
1 quart ginger ale, chilled 

1 pint brandy or cognac 

2 bottles (4/5 quart each) 
champagne, chilled 

Ice cubes, strawberries and 
orange slices 

In a large punch bowl, mix cranberry juice 
cocktail, orange juice, ginger ale and brandy. 
Slowly stir in champagne. Add ice cubes, 
strawberries and orange slices. Stir until 
very cold. Serve in punch cups. 



^Cetters 



LIKES NEW FORMAT 

We enjoy reading your magazine. 
It is very good, larger in size and glossy 
paper. Congratulations! 

Stephen Horbach 
Brewster, Mass. 



TAUNTON 

4 Pflme Bois 

• 22 Acres 

•Good Water & Soil 

• Dormant - Ready to 

Rebuild 

•Chapter 61 A - Plans 

LEASE OR SALE 
(508) 896-6262 



CRANBERRY 

GROWERS 

REALTY 

Listings of buyers and 

sellers welcomed on 

cranberry acreage 

and upland. 

Appraisals 

DOUGLAS R. BEATON 

E. Sandwich, Mass 

02537 

(617)888-1288 



The 

CHARLES W.HARRIS 

Company 

451 Old Somerset Avenue 
North Dighton, Mass. 
Phone (508) 824-5607 

AMES 

Antisyphon Devices 

RAINBIRD 

Sprinklers 

HALE 

Pumps 

Hlihesf Quality Ptoduets 
WIthSitlsftetion &u9mfeeil 




CONSULTING ENGINEERS 
SURVEYORS 



Extensive experience In all aspects of cranberry 
land development: evaluation, purchase, survey, 
design, permit acquisition, phased construction and 
planting both in wetlands and uplands. 

Have references. Will travel. 

Contact: Will Lee 

10948 Highway 54 East 
Wisconsin Rapids, Wl 54494 

(715)424-3151 



Page 22 CRANBERRIES September 1989 



The Pilgrim stands behind 
every commercial loan 
John Bermingham 
makes. 




And that's a 
promise. 

Call him on it at 888-2092. 

The Pilgrim is a symbol of strength, integrity and experience 
and it best personifies the resources John Bermingham offers every 
business that turns to him for help. 

A vice president of our conjmerdal banking operation, John has 
over 20 years of banking know-how. His expertise has helped to 
earn us a reputation as The Answer Bank. 

Backed by the superior lending capabilities of P!fymouth Savings 
Bank, John can design a commercial lending package with the 
attractive rates and fast turnaround time that you need. 

This is the power and the promise of the Pilgrim, 

Call John Bermingham at 888-2092. 



Plymouth 

Main Office: Vtereham, (508)295-3800; ,:ig:iiiil ' ^-^ • 

Cotuit, (508) 428-1300; Duxbury, (617) 934-0101 ; V~^ ^.^Vt/mCXC 

Falmouth, (508) 548-3000; Marion, (508) 748-2919; " 5^5 ^**" " 'f%^ 

Masfipee, (508) 477-7984; Mattapoisett, (508) 758-4936: f L*]l n I !*-' 

Middleboro, (508) 946-1777; North Plymoutfi, (508) 747-1600; ril K^nl^ 

Plymouth, (508) 746-3300; Sandwich, (508) 888-M44; ' ^ ' l^t*! Il^ 

Teaticket, (508) 540-5002 Member FDIC/DIFM 



58N210589 



CRANBERRIES September 1989 Page 23 



Take Good 

Care of "four self 

Have an Ocean Spray! 



"»~c; 




%mS>\'^y 



The farmer's cooperative that brings you 
a wide range of natural fruit juices, drinks and sauces 

Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc., Lakeville-Middleboro, MA 02349 
An Equal Opportunity Employer 



23 
2r 




S£p: 



CRANBERRIES 

VTHE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGATh^iE 

October 1989 Vol. 53, No. . " 




<St 



Growers 1st 
To Use 
Nematodes 



New Book 
On Wisconsin 
Cran History 



Changing 

Of Guard 

^ For CCCGA 



Another 
Record Crop 
1.^ Forecast 



£0010 yw 

-LSiJ3HWy 

Ay«.yan ills S«^?,l 



. vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv vcyagggg 



Cranberry Harvesting Equipment 

Warrens Equipment & Manufacturing Co., Inc. 



Growing cranberries is 
something you as a grower do 
best. Manufacturing of 
harvesting equipment, air 
flow, radar controlled fertilizer 
spreading equipment, and 
flow gates or flumes is 
something we do that can be 
of service to you. 



NEWS FLASHES 

standard WEM Bog-Trac Tractors & Beaters Available For Immediate Shipment 

• Beater reels available, your choice of designs • Safety parking brake 

• You as a grower tell us what Is best for your bog • Ground speed and reel speed Indicator 

• Change your reel rpm from bog to bog or variety to variety • Lighter weight 

• Engine horsepower available from 18 h.p. to 48 h.p. 
Be sure to check this new model harvester before you make a purchase for 1989. 




WEM FactOiy serving Wisconsin, West Coast, British Columbia 

111 Grant St. 
Warrens, Wi 54666 
Tel. (608) 378-4794 
(608) 378-4137 



WEM East Coast 

Steams Irrigation, Inc. 

790 Federal Furnace Rd. 

Plymouth, MA 02360 

Tel. (508) 746-6048 




NOTECARDS 



FROM BARBARA McFARLAND'S PAINTINGS 

"THE GREAT NORTHERN CRANBERRY" 

& 

"RAKE 'EM" 

Are Available In Full Color, Size 4.25" x 5.5" 



6 Notes, 3 of Each Design with Envelopes 
Are Priced At $6.50 a Package. 

To Order CRANBERRY SERIES #1 - Send Check or Money 
Order To: 

WOODSHOLM GALLERY 

Rt.2 McFarland Drive 

Manitowish Waters, WI 54545 

715-543-2975 

Shipping/handling ■ Add $2.00 plus $.25 each after 5 packages. 




Page 2 CRANBERRIES October 1989 



First to Use Parasitic Nematodes 



Cranberry Growers 
Pioneer in 
Biological Controls 






Grower members of Ocean Spray marched to the front ranks of agricultural science this past 
growing season when they became the first farmers in North America to enlist parasitic 
nematodes instead of chemicals to destroy crop devouring insects. 

Nematodes were used previously in small-scale research projects. And they have been 
utilized commercially in other parts of the world, e.g., Italy. But their use by cranberry growers 
in the spring and summer of 1989 marked their first use on a commercial scale on this 
continent. 

"We're seeing tremendously positive results," Larry Dapsis, Ocean Spray entomologist and 
integrated pest management coordinator, told CRANBERRIES. 

In Washington state, the spraying of nematodes gave participating growers as much as a 96 
percent reduction in black vine weevil. Oregon growers achieved 90 percent control. 



THE DEVELOPMENT of such 

biological controls as nematode use 
comes at a welcome time, given the 
growth of pesticide resistant 
insects, consumer and environ- 
mental criticism of agricultural 
chemicals, the high cost of develop- 
ing and licensing chemicals and 
other factors. 

Dapsis cautions, however, that 
much more research needs to be 
done before biological controls 

I become widespread. 
In a spring 1989 nematode pro- 
ject, which involved 66 growers in 
Oregon, Washington, Massachu- 
setts and British Columbia, some 



COVER PHOTO 
MAGNIFIED 380 times, this is 
one of the nematodes that may 
become a significant weapon 
in the war against cranberry 
devouring insects. A story on 
nematode research and devel- 
ppment starts on this page. 
J Photo courtesy of Ocean Spray) 



growers had 100 percent reduction 
of black vine weevil, others had no 
reduction. 

"Does this have something to do 
with different soils?" asked Dap- 
sis. "We know soils vary greatly in 
cranberrying. For these and other 
reasons, we must have an active 
research program." 

Cost is another significant fac- 
tor. At this stage, nematodes cost 
six to 10 times as much as equival- 



ent chemicals, Dapsis said. The 
goal of BIOSYS, the company that 
supplied the nematodes, is 
ultimately to be competitive in 
pricing with chemicals, he added. 

The field of nematode use is so 
new that 3'/2 years ago, to use Dap- 
sis' words, it was an "academic 
curiousity." University researchers 
in Washington and Oregon did 
much of the initial study. 

' *We came in on the second stage, ' ' 



Great Bog Sand! 

Right from the Heart of Cranberry Country 

Reserve your supply now for winter delivery 
(depending on ice) or we will stockpile at your bog 

anytime. 

Very Competitive Price 

Call Today 

1-800-696-SAND 

Catoll Sand & Gravel inc. 

P.O. Box 750 

Hanson, MA 02341 



CRANBERRIES October 1989 Page 



Dapsis spid. 

That second stage involved a col- 
laborative effort by Ocean Spray, 
grov.ers, university scientists, 
including those from the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts, and BIO- 
SYS, a private biological pest con- 
trol company in Palo Alto, Calif. 

Dapsis also credited Dave Simser, 
researcher for New Alchemy Insti- 
tute in Falmouth, Mass., for his 
work in the field. 

NEMATODES are unsegmented 
roundworms embracing sopie 
500,000 species, ranging firom the 
microscopic variety this article is 
about to 30 foot long tapeworms. 
Some nematodes are harmful to 
plants and animals, others, as 
scientists now know, can be 
beneficial. 

According to Jeff Rundell, Ocean 
Spray senior public relations 
representative, it isn't the nema- 
tode itself which kills the black 
vine or root weevil. Rather, the 
worm carries a species of Xenor- 
habdus bacteria which destroys the 
larvae of the insect. 

The nematode also reproduces in 
the carcasses of the larvae, thus 
releasing more nematodes into the 
soil. 

So much for biological study and 
theory. How are they produced in 
massive quantities and applied to 
the bog? That's where BIOSYS 
came in. The biotechnology com- 
pany is headed by Dr. Venkat 
Sohoni, a Ph.D. from Bombay, 
India, with 17 years experience with 
Sandoz, where he was vice presi- 
dent of the crop protection division. 

First of all, BIOSY developed a 
liquid culture, a mix of nutrients 
and bacteria in which the prolific, 
microscopic worms thrive. In eight 
to ten days, a batch of the mix will 
contain l'/2 trillion nematodes. 

BIOSY also formulated a plastic 
bead to hold or contain the worms. 
A number of beads are then placed 
in an 8 X 10 X 2 inch mesh bag. 
Each bag holds one billion 
nematodes. 

The grower then places the mesh 
bag in five gallons of water, much 
like you would put a tea bag in a 
eapot. Only, instead of absorbing 
tee the grower's water absorbs 
nematodes, which hate dry, love 

Page 4 CRANBERRIES October 1989 



■♦«i 



«r" 




<' y 



^ 



, I 



^' 



NEMATODES have been used successfully on a commercial 
scale to control black vine weevil and cranberry girdler. 

(Photo courtesy of Ocean Spray) 




i 



wet. 

Dapsis says the favored method 
of appUcation is by sprajdng via 
the irrigation system. Sprajdng by 
heUcopter is less favored because 
the actual quantity of material is 
so small and the nematodes have a 
distaste for dry air and ultraviolet 
light. 

Three billion nematodes are 
sprayed per acre. 

IN LATE JULY 300 acres in 
British Columbia were sprayed with 
nematodes to combat cranberry 
girdler. The results had not yet 
been assessed at the time of this 
writing. 

I The outcome is particularly cru- 
'cial for British Columbia because 
that cranberry growing province 
does not have a registered chemi- 
cal agent against the girdler. 

CRANBERRIES spoke to Dap- 
sis just before he was going out to 
the field to study application of 
nematodes to the white grub prob- 
lem, which is particularly beset- 
ting Wisconsin. 

White grub is coming back as a 
result of the dissipation of DDT 
residues, Dapsis said, and so far 

CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

SEND CORRESPONDENCE TO: 

P.O. BOX 249 

COBALT CT 06414 

(203) 342-4730 

Fax #: (203) 342-1977 

PUBLISHER « EDITOR: BOB TAYLOR 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: CAROLYN GILMORE 
(508) 763-5206 

ADVISORS & CORRESPONDENTS 

MASSACHUSETTS — Irving E Demoranville, 
Director. Cranberry Experiment Station. 

NEW JERSEY — Phillip E Marucci. Crantjerry & Blueljerry 
Specialist, Buddtown; Elizabeth G Carpenter, Chatsworth 

NOVA SCOTIA — Robert A Murray, Horticulturist, Berry 
• >ops. Research Station, Truro. 

OREGON — Arthur Poole, Coos County Extension Agent, 
3oquille. 

WASHINGTON — Azmi Y Shawa, Horticulturist and 
■etired Director, Coastal Washington Research & Extension 
Jnit, Long Beach. 

WISCONSIN — Tod. D. Planer, Farm Management Agent, 
Vood County. 

;RANBERRIES is published monthly by Taylor Publishing, 2 
feeslone Ave , Ponland. CT 06480 Second class postage is paid 
t the Portland, CT Post Office. Price Is $15 a year, $28 for two 
ears, $2 a copy inlhe U S , $17 a year in Canada: $20 a year in all 
ther countries. Bacic copies: $2.50, Including postage. Copyright 
I 989 by Taylor Publishing 

ISSN: 0011-0787 

Postmaster, send Fomi 3749 to: 

CRANBERRIES 

P O BOX 249 

COBALT. CT 06414 



there hasn't been a successful trial 
using nematodes. 

The trick, he said, will be to inject 
the nematodes deeply enough into 
the soil to reach the white grub 
without applying so much pressure 
that the nematodes are injured. 

"These natural, biological con- 
trols are exciting and will be 
expanding as we target other 
insects," Dapsis said. 

A focal point of Ocean Spray's 
future progress in insect control 
will be the cooperative's new agri- 
cultural research center at its 
Lakeville-Middleboro, Mass., 
headquarters. 

The company plans to build on 
its first successful commercial 
application with nematodes 
through its established partner- 
ships with BIOSY and the afore- 
mentioned universities. 

GOOD control has been achieved 
with insecticides used in the past, 
Dapsis said. One drawback of their 
use, he added, is microbial degra- 
dation. This occurs after a long 
period of use during which certain 
microbes are "selected out," lead- 
ing to soil degradation. 

As for the present higher cost of 
nematode treatment, Dapsis said 
he expects that the cost will come 
down as production techniques are 
enhanced, economies of scale are 
realized as demand increases, and 



inevitable competition arises. 

Right now, the Ocepn Spray 
scientist said, nematodes : ^ ^eing 
introduced into so-ca/ ■* niche 
markets. Florida citrus and tUx ' ~e 
two such markets, he explained. 
On the other hand, corn growers 
can't afford the cost at this time. 

Pests, said Dapsis, are less likely 
to build resistance to nematodes 
the way they do to chemicals. 

"That's not to say there won't be 
any resistance," he noted. "Some 
insects have an immune system 
that'll fight off the bacteria. But 
nematodes won't put on the selec- 
tion pressure that pesticides do." 

Dapsis evidently can talk biolog- 
ical controls all day and he is par- 
ticularly high on the subject right 
now, having recently returned from 
the first international symposium 
in the field. 

"It lasted three days and was 
held in Pacific Groves, CaUf.," he 
remarked. "There were 107 scien- 
tists there from 16 different coun- 
tries, entomologists as well as peo- 
ple from a variety of other 
disciplines. 

"What they're seeing," he said, 
"is tremendously positive results." 




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Wonders of Science 

like all of you, this writer was enthralled over the past 
month by the photos of a blue Neptune and a pink-blue Triton 
wondrously captured by that computerized peeping tom of the 
universe, Voyager 2. 

But I also was awed by the wonders inherent in science's 
research much closer to home, among creatures much too small 
to be seen by the human eye. Those creatures: nematodes and 
the bacteria they carry that destroy crop devouring insects. 

Both scientific endeavors deal with figures that stagger the 
imagination. Voyager transmits photos and data over 2.8 bil- 
lion miles to the Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena, Calif. Three 
billion nematodes are sprayed over a single acre of cranberry 
bog. 

Both fields require highly intelligent, creative and dedicated 
scientists to bring brilliantly conceived hypotheses to fruition. 

All who play a role in the two endeavors— from the astrono- 
mers and engineers in Pasadena to the cranberry researchers 
and growers from Massachusetts to Washington— have a right 
to feel mighty proud and deserve our hearty applause. 

What's in a Name? 

The name of the company that publishes CRANBERRIES 
used to be Taylor Publishing. 

Then we changed it to Diversified Periodicals. We're going 
back to Taylor Publishing. 

Diversified Periodicals means something to us. We publish 
magazines in diverse fields. But it hasn't always meant some- 
thing to the outside world. We're repeatedly asked to repeat the 
name of the company. Too many ad agency secretaries ask us 
two, three or more times to spell both words. 

We haven't had to summon much imagination to come up 
with Taylor Publishing. We publish. Taylor is the last name of 
the company owner. It's pretty easy to spell. And the name is 
more suitable, if and when we get involved in occasional book 
publishing. 

So that's that. It's Taylor Publishing. 



ICctt^rg 



WORD FROM FINLAND 

Thanks to you for your nice magazine. 

Marjo Valtanen 
Siilinjarvi, Finland 
P.S. A cranberry lover! 

Page 6 CRANBERRIES October 1989 




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Another Record Crop 



By CAROLYN GILMORE 

A record 1989 U.S. cranberry crop 
of 4, 1 13,000 barrels was forecast by 
the Cranberry Marketing Commit- 
tee at its Aug. 15 meeting in 
Milwaukee. 

The committee's numbers are 
higher than the USD A projection 
of 3,925,000 barrels. 

The 1988 U.S. crop totaled 
4,065,859 barrels, according to 
David Farrimond, general manager 
of the Cranberry Marketing 
Committee. 

The committee's crop forecast by 
region is: 

Massachusetts, 1,904,000 

New Jersey, 360,000 

Wisconsin, 1,540,000 

Oregon, 162,000 

Washington, 147,000 







Foreign (Canada), 336,000 
Total North America: 4,448,000 

Subtracting a 4 percent "shrin- 
kage" or amount of berries deli- 
vered to the processor but not 
handled and adding a handler 
"carry in" or frozen fruit inventory 
at harvest amounting to 750,000 
barrels, brings the total expected 
cranberry supply in North Amer- 
ica to 5,020,000. 

Demand for the fruit, calculated 
by the committee to be 5,636,500 
barrels, would still be higher than 
supply. 

As a result, the committee's pol- 
icy for the 1989 crop year "does not 
include any volume regulation 
recommendation," Farrimond said. 
Any such recommendation would 
affect cranberries produced in the 



states of Massachusetts, New Jer- 
sey, Wisconsin, Oregon and 
Washington, all of which come 
under the federal marketing order. 

AT the half day Milwaukee meeting, 
committee members proposed a $172,602 
operating budget, down more than $25,000 
from last year's expenses. The per barrel 
handler assessment will drop from 5.5<t per 
barrel to 3.6<t per barrel. 

"It was a positive meeting," Farrimond 
said. "The committee formally approved the 
proposed revisions to the marketing order. 
The committee also approved sending a 
formal letter to USDA requesting hearings 
on the proposed amendments. Tentatively, 
the conunittee is expected to conduct hear- 
ings in all growing areas during the middle 
of January through the first part of 
February." 

A week prior to the conunittee meeting, 
Chairman Marshall Severance and Farri- 
mond met with USDA marketing order offi- 



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CRANBERRIES October 1989 Page 7 



rials and legal counsel in Washington, D.C. 

'"".aey were satisfied the proposed 
amendments met legalities," Farrimond 
reported. 

It is still a lengthy process until growers 
can vote on the amendments, he said. The 
hearings are followed by transcriptions of 
the meetings, a comment period, USDA 
review, evaluation and recommendations, a 
second comment period and final decision 
by USDA to hold the referendum. 

"It will be at a minimum a year to 18 
months before growers can vote on (the 
amendments)," Farrimond said. "The 
committee is hopeful the growers will vote to 
accept the proposed amendments. It has 
taken five years of work to this point." 

Among other matters, the amendments 
involve base quantity assignments. 

The next full committee meeting will fol- 
low the March 1990 hearings in Washing- 
ton, D.C. 



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CRANBERRIES October 1989 Page 9 



100 Years of History in 
Wisconsin Cranberry Boole 



By FRED POSS 

Everyone's "good book," the 
Bible, has a favorite passage that 
reminds us, "For everything there 
is a season." And to commemorate 
one hundred harvest seasons of the 
Wisconsin Cranberry Growers 
Association, some of the members 
have put their heads together to 
pubhsh the Wisconsin Cranberry 
Growers Centennial Heritage Book. 

The timing of the pubhcation 
couldn't be better if you listen to 
some of its promoters. According to 
information released by Carolyn 
Habelman, co-chair of the project, 
the book emerged in final form just 
in time for the summer field day 
held at the Ocean Spray Warrens 
Receiving Station this August 8. 

And not only is the book's arrival 
timely — so are its contents. 

Nordji Van Wychen, past presi- 
dent of the growers association, 
explained that the book "is proba- 
bly our growers' best reference guide 
for our association right now." 

With more than a little pride in 
her voice, she related the 
background of the book's creation. 

"It was completely done by 
volunteers from the cranberry 
association," she said. "And they 
spent many, many hours working 
on this. We are very proud of the 
outcome . . . and we feel this will be 
a keepsake for years in the future." 

JUDIE Harkner, the other co- 
chair of the book project, shared 
some insights into the nuts and 
bolts of financing such a publi- 
cation. 

"A small margin of profit will be 
realized as a result of the sale of the 
book," she said, as she staffed the 
sales table for the work. "And after 
all the books are sold, the commit- 
tee will probably meet in May to do 
something in the form of charity 
vith the money left over." 

W^at charitable avenues will the 
committee consider? 

Page 10 CRANBERRIES October 1989 



Harkner explained, "Well, we 
want to promote the Wisconsin 
cranberry industry, so we're not 
sure if it will be in the form of dona- 
tions to charitable organizations 
who, in turn, support the industry, 
or if we'll do it in the form of an 
educational scholarship or educa- 
tional book or pamphlet to distrib- 



ute throughout the area to visitors. 
"With the growers' centennial 
coming up, we felt it (the book) 
would be extremely timely to write 
and CaroljTi Habelman had expe- 
rience writing a historical book," 
Harkner concluded. She said about 
20 individuals contributed their 
time and the the project took about 



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a year to finish. 

Carolyn Habelman, appearing as 
a relief pitcher for those at the busy 
sales table, generously took time 
away from that work to provide 
more information about the con- 
tents of the book. 

"We started out with a chrono- 
logical history of the industry, then 
we branched into the history of the 
growers association in the state of 
Wisconsin," she told me. "And then 
we put in 'The Beginnings' . . . 
things prior to when Wisconsin 
was even a state, and then brought 
it up .... " 

BUT besides historical fact, Habel- 
man, Harkner and crew were able to 
weld together some highly imusual and 
fascinating elements in the heritage 
book. 

Habelman explained: "And then we 
interviewed seniors (senior citizens) and 
had them type up their memories of the 
industry and what they were told of the 
early 1870's and 80's. And then the 
next (book section) was 'The Centen- 
nial.' Then we went into biogra- 
phies — anyone associated with the 
industry today — grower, worker on the 



marsh or workers in the plant. 

"Then we had a section on memor- 
ials," she said, "memorials to people 
who were important to the industry." 

Other sections Habelman mentioned 
were poetry and song as they related to 
cranberries and recipes using cranber- 
ries, beginning with a hundred years 
ago and coming up to the present day. 

And the research is well documented. 
Mrs. Habelman spoke with real 
authority about the heritage publica- 
tion as she listed such sources as the 
Wisconsin State Historical Society, 
agricultural records, industry newslet- 
ters, books, pamphlets, growers asso- 
ciation minutes and information 
gleaned from CRANBERRIES 
magazine. 

And to help pay for such a publica- 
tion, what did the committee come up 
with? 

"The business ads," she revealed. 
"We asked them not to put in a (regu- 
lar) business ad. We wanted a history 
of their business and what they did for 
the industry, whether it be a lawyer or 
a business that sold irrigation pipes— 
with pictures telling like what their 
business looked like 40 years ago, as 
well as what they sell today." 



Ocean Spray, she explained, donated 
the price for the color pictures inside 
and back that capture the beauty of 
harvest time. 

Those interested in obtaining a copy 
should know the 315 page heritage 
book comes with a cranberry red lea- 
therette 9x12 cover embossed in gold, 
with a gold medallion depicting a 
cranberry grower using the old Wis- 
consin hand rake in a cranberry bed. 

The book sells for $38.50 plus $3.50 
shipping. Wisconsin residents should 
add 5% sales tax. Orders may be 
addressed to: Wisconsin Cranberry 
Growers Centennial Book, Judie 
Harkner, Route 3, Box 263B, Black 
River Falls, WI 54615. 

One glimpse of the rich exterior and 
fascinating saga of the Wisconsin 
cranberry industry captured between 
the pages of the heritage book induces 
one to paraphrase an old and revered 
saying: One good turn of the page 
deserves another. 

That's what readers will be doing 
with the pages of this good book, this 
unique record of the Wisconsin cran- 
berry story. 



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CRANBERRIES October 1989 Page 11 



REGIONAL 
NOTES 

MASSACHUSETTS 

By IRVING E. DEMORANVILLE 

Carolyn DeMoranville attended the annual 
meeting of the American Society for Horticul- 
tural Science held in Tulsa, Okla., July 29- 
Aug. 4. She presented a paper on nutrition 
studies on cranberry vines. 

WISCONSIN 

A combined museum and gift shop, Cran- 
berry Expo Ltd., has opened at the Potter 
Cranberry Marsh in Warrens. Operator of the 
museum is Peggy Anderson as a tribute to 
grandfather, father and uncles, who have 
been involved with cranberrying in central 
Wisconsin for 140 years. 

Weather 

MASSACHUSETTS 

July was cool, averaging 1.3 degrees a day 
below normal. Maximum temperature was 87 
degrees on both the 7th and 28th and min- 
imum was 53 degrees on the 1st. It was cool 
the early part of the month and again just after 



the middle of the month. Otherwise, it was 
just average. 

Rainfall totaled 5.47 inches or nearly dou- 
ble the normal. This is the fourth largest in our 
records, surpassed only in 1988, 1928 and 
1956. It also makes five of the past six years 
that July rainfall has been substantially above 
normal. There was measurable rainfall on 10 
days, with 2.86 i nches on the 1 6th and 1 7th as 
the greatest storm. Several bogs suffered 
substantial hail damage on the 30th. The hail 
wasn't widespread, however. 



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CRANBERRIES October 1989 Page 13 



CCCGA Annual Meeting 

New Prexy Calls for Grower Action 



By CAROLYN GILMORE 

Jeffrey Kapell, the Cape Cod 
Cranberry Growers Association's 
president-elect, told growers at 
August's annual meeting that his 
goal for his two year term of office 
is to step up efforts to educate the 
public about the role of the Massa- 
chusetts cranberry industry. 

He said cranberry growers must 
have an active voice in local and 



state regulations affecting 
agriculture. 

"Some growers are beginning to 
think this is getting to be a lot less 
fun," Kapell said. "Unfortunately, 
the world has changed and you're 
not going to be left alone anymore." 

Stepping off the board of direc- 
tors were David Mann and Ben- 
jamin Gilmore II. They were 
replaced by Wayne Barnes and 



Kirby Gilmore. 

The association's annual meet- 
ing was attended by about 750 
growers, guests and families. Dis- 
plays of tractors, trucks, IPM ser- 
vices, cranberry paraphernalia and 
investment services were set up by 
the Massachusetts Cranberry 
Experiment Station. 

A barbeque was sponsored by 
the CCCGA. 



Past Prexy Reflects on Term 



Douglas R. Beaton, immediate past 
president of the Cape Cod Cranberry 
Growers Association, reflected on his 
term of office in the July/August 1989 
issue of the CCCGA newsletter. 

Below are his words: 

"As you know, I will be stepping 
down as president of the association 
later on this month. The last two years 
have been quite a challenge for the 
CCCGA, but all in all I would say that 
we have accomplished a great deal. 

"First of all, I want to thank the 
employees and committee members of 
the Cape Cod Cranberry Growers 
Association for their hard work; the 
board of directors, for being patient 
and productive; but most of all, the 
membership, for their unyielding sup- 
port, because, after all, without an 
active membership, our association 
would be ineffective. 

"I first became 'active' in the CCCGA 
in 1975, when I was elected to our board 
of directors. I can remember the frus- 
tration that the influx in government 
regulations had caused our growers 
during that time of 'environmental 
awakening.' Back then, we used to wait 
for new laws and regulations to come 
out, and then we would react. More 
often than not, it was a case of too little 
action too late. 

"The wetland laws are a great exam- 
ple of how important it is for cranberry 
fctowers, as an entity, to be involved 
before, during and after the develop- 
moT! if local, state and federal legisla- 
tion, ihat one piece of legislation, as I 
am sure you all know too well, has vir- 

Page 14 CRANBERRIES October 1989 



tuaUy denied our local industry growth. 
Maybe if we had been more involved in 
the legislative process, and presented 
all the ways in which cranberry bogs 
benefit wetland environments, those 
laws wouldn't have been passed. 

During my two year term in office, 
the CCCGA has attempted to create a 
situation where we are working with 
the regulators and legislators, rather 
than against them. For the first time in 
our 102 year history, we hired a full- 
time executive director (Jeffrey Carl- 
son) and a governmental affairs direc- 
tor (Henry Gillett). 

With these new additions to the 
CCCGA, we will now always be aware 
of and participate in regulatory issues. 
Since we have been working with, 
rather than against the regulators and 
legislators, the association has 
accomplished much. 

We are now viewed as a 'model' 
industry by achieving 95 percent com- 
pliance with the 'Right to Know' law! 
Just recently, we worked with the EPA 
to amend the chemigation requirements 
to accomodate the cranberry industry. 
We have also fought very hard to 
achieve a fair and equitable tax rate in 
the town of Carver and have been suc- 
cessful in preventing a number of 
expensive and damaging laws and 
regulations from being enacted. 

As my term draws to a close, I would 
like to emphasize the importance of 
your involvement, not only at our 
monthly meetings, but also at the local 
board of health, zoning and conserva- 
tion commission meetings. We need to 



invest time into these local agencies, so 
that we don't, once again, find our- 
selves reacting after the fact. 

Once again, thank you for all of your 
support over the past two years, and 
good luck with your harvest. 




0^. 



Equipment, inc. 



381 West Grove St. (Rte. 28) 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

(508) 947-6299 

^KUBOTR 

Tractors, Excavators and 
Diesel Generators 



(i 



pYOTE 

Wheel Loaders 
3/4 Yd - 6 1/2 Yd 

Screening Equipment 




AMONG the demonstrations at the Cape Cod Cranberry Growers Association annual 
meeting was this one of a "sure-flo," self-cleaning suction screen. 

(CRANBERRIES photos by Carolyn Gibnore) 





SKID Whipple of the Forges Cranberry Co. won first prize in the grower constructed 
equipment award for this sanding barge he built. 

CRANBERRIES October 1989 Page 15 




THIS IPM exhibit at the Cape Cod Cranberry Growers Association annual meeting 
was staffed by personnel from the Cranberry Experiment Station, Ocean Spray and 
DeCran Ag Supplies. (CRANBERRIES photos by Carolyn Gilmore) 




JOE THOMAS, editor and publisher of Spinner Publications, addressed the group on 
the book he is preparing on the history of the cranberry industry in Massachusetts. 

Page 16 CRANBERRIES October 1989 



1 



Visitors Learn at Summer Fieid Day 



The Big Chill' Awaits Berries 
Sent to New Storage Facility 



By FRED POSS 

The Wisconsin Cranberry Grow- 
ers Association and the staff of 
Ocean Spray's Warrens Receiving 
Station provided a warm, conge- 
nial welcome to visitors and guests 
attending the Summer Field Day 
held in Warrens Aug. 8. And there 
was nothing chilly about the 
friendly assistance the growers 
association provided with packets 
of information for everyone or the 
thorough tours of its state-of-the- 
art receiving station Ocean Spray 
had ready and waiting. 

"We expect over a thousand peo- 
ple today," explained Marianne 
Strozewski, as she and Sue Demp- 
sey of the WCGA busily distributed 
materials from the welcome table 
just inside the front door. 

But all the glad-to-meet-you 
warmth aside, the growers and the 
receiving station seriously intend 
to put the "big chill" on business 
beginning this year! 

"Ocean Spray is arranging to 
lease some of the 80,000 square feet 
of freezer space and 20,000 square 
feet of processing space in a new 
Americold facility being constructed 
adjoining our Warrens Receiving 
Station," explained Sheryl Rucker, 
tour guide for Ocean Spray. "Ame- 
ricold is a nationwide freezing 
company and when the cranber- 
ries are harvested, received, cleaned 
and weighed, they can be sent to 
the Americold freezers to be stored 
for up to one year — perhaps even 
longer." 

THERE was nothing cold or stingy, 
however, about the effort Ocean Spray 
put forth to demonstrate the wonders 
of its automated receiving station. 

Beginning with a look at three huge, 
open concrete pools for receiving the 
fruit, Ms. Rucker cheerfully escorted 
our group around the station, precisely 
explaining each step of the operation. 

The three pools will each be 10 to 12 
feet deep with cranberries, she revealed. 



The berries are washed there after a 
random sampling of fruit, using a 
vacuum probe, has been taken from a 
truck. Air cleaners separate out the 



vines and leaves. Brushwashers then 

remove any fruit that does not meet the 

high standard of quality that Ocean 

(Please turn page) 



J^ 


T 




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& 


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Extensive experience in all aspects of cranberry 
land development: evaluation, purchase, survey, 
design, permit acquisition, phased construction and 
planting both in wetlands and uplands. 




Have references. Will travel. 




Contact: Will Lee 

10948 Highway 54 East 
Wisconsin Rapids, wi 54494 

(715)424-3131 



Vines For Sale 

Ben Lear $5,000 a ton 

Stevens $4,000 a ton 

Crowley $4,000 a ton 

Bergman $4,000 a ton 

Prices are F.O.B. 
$500 a ton less with 50% payment before cutting 



RIchberry Farms Ltd. 



11280 Mellis Drive 
Richmond, B.C. 
V6X 1L7 Canada 



Res. (604) 273-4505 
Bus. (604) 273-0777 



CRANBERRIES October 1989 Page 17 



Spray sets. 

After grading into different sizes 
which qualifies the berries for either 
lark, medium or Hght cranberry hnes, 
the fruit is shuttled into 1,200 lb. tote 
bins or into bulk trucks to be shipped to 
the freezer and later processed into var- 
ious cranberry and fruit drinks, sauces 
and snack items. 

FINISHING the tour atop the control 
panel located in the center of the build- 
ing, our guide concluded by showing 
how the buttons on the panel matched 
up with the various conveyor lines. 

"The plant can be run by one per- 
son," she said — an amazing comment 
on the investment in technology that 
Ocean Spray has made at the Warrens 
station. 

And though our tour "chilled out" 
and Ms. Rucker turned to warm up 
another, the growers meeting, displays, 
demonstrations and equipment dealers 



that beckoned for attention at Summer 
Field Day could be characterized as 
"really cool" too! 

The growers association had a care- 
fully laid out agenda for the field day: 
8:30 a.m. registration, 9 to noon exhib- 
its, then lunch, a welcome by Charles 
"Chuck" Strozewski, new president, 
and a business meeting in the afternoon. 

Casually walking about, one couldn't 
avoid the coldest treat of the day — 
cranberry ice cream being served up 
free for the asking as a means of prom- 
oting one more inventive use for the 
little red berry that provides a liveli- 
hood for so many families. 

And artists such as Ann Kurz 
Chambers from Port Edwards, Wise, 
who specialize in cranberry originals — 
paintings, ceramics, intaglios and even 
clothing — were on hand to demonstrate 
and sell their work. Ms. Chambers 
explains in her brochure that "my 



greatest reward is the interest and 
encouragement of all who appreciate 



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Matching Sweatpants, white 



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NAME 



ADDRESS 
CITY 



, STATE 



ZIP 



:».».s.i.».i.<.i.^\^^<.^^T».<.^.t.t.t.<.ti.i.<.^<.^^^i.t^<^^.^<.ttmtm»»^^^n^^^^t^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^«««**ttc»»m^»^i.i.^ 



Page 18 CRANBERRIES October 1989 



my work." 

Another business that really does 
put the "big chill" into its work is Cran- 
trol, an insect scouting service out of 
Warrens that has newly been estab- 
lished by Laurel Riedel. 

Ms. Riedel generously took time to 
explain how her college work and nat- 
ural interest in biology led her to create 
a professional service to rid cranberry 
growers of pests. Her business litera- 
ture points out how advantageous it is 
to use a scouting service. 

Early identification of insects, regu- 
lar examination done by a professional 
and avoidance of misdiagnosed deer 
damage are all features that her new 
business offers to potential customers. 

OF COURSE, cranberry royalty was 
on hand, too, to thaw even the coldest 
stranger with generous smiles and a 
few good words about cranberries. 
Cranberry queen Missy Nelson and 
princesses Ami Matson and Sue Wal- 
heim were there to remind visitors of 
the soon to come Warrens Cranberry 
Festival. 

All in all, most everyone interviewed 
seemed to agree that the 1989 Summer 
Field Day was a red hot success. Due to 
the tireless efforts of the staff of Ocean 
Spray, the volunteers and officers of 
the growers association, artists. 



business men and women and over a 
thousand visitors and guests, the only 
big chill of this harvest season is a big, 
brand new freezer for the fruit crop that 
was turning red on the vine. And, given 
the size of the freezer, maybe even 
grandma can rent some locker space in 
it for her cranberry preserve. 



OVER 2 MILLION FARMS 

The Census Burea i reports that the Uni- 
ted States had 2,087,759 faiTrit: ; 1087. 

Only slightly over one-haif i i^ose 
farms— 1,059,573— had annual product sales 
of $10,000 or more, however. 



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SERVICES 



Herbicides 
Applied 

Custom Pruning 
Custom Ditching 

West Wareham, 
Massachusetts 



Sanding 

Wiping 

Wet Harvesting 

Mowing 

(Moiving includes 
Hydraulic Arm 
Flail Mower.) 

Ask for Rick at 
295-5158 




CRANBERRIES October 1989 Page 19 




^'^mMW'0' 



*OH, I LOVE FARMING. IT'S JUST THAT WE HAVE TO BE CAREFUL OF OVERPRODUCTION.' 



CRANBERRY 

GROWERS 

REALTY 

Listings of buyers and 

sellers welcomed on 

cranberry acreage 

and upland. 

Appraisals 

DOUGLAS R. BEATON 

E. Sandwich, Mass 

02537 

(617)888-1288 



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Grower Service 

MOWING (ALL TYPES) DITCHING 

SANDING WEED WIPING 

Serving Cape Cod 

227 Pine St., W. Barnstable, Ma. 02668 

Phone 362-6018 



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Page 20 CRANBERRIES October 1989 



Specify Item and quantity 

Consensus Reached on 
Definition of Organic 

Representatives of the organic food pro- 
ducers and mainstream agriculture reached 
consensus on a definition of organic at a 



recent meeting in Dallas. 

The meeting was called by representa- 
tives of the United Fresh Fruit and Vegeta- 
ble Association in order to achieve standard 
language which can be understood by con- 
sumers, retailers and growers. This lack of 
uniformity, the proliferation of state laws 
and regulations, and the recent efforts at 
the Congressional level and in the federal 




General Excavating 



Pond Construction & Maintenance 
Land Clearing, Ditching, Canal Work 

Dragline (63' reach) & Clamshell 
Gradall 6' Bucket D-8 Dozer 

Road Grader 

Bill Conway 

228 W. Brittania St. 

Taunton, MA 02780 

(508) 822-1085 



CAPEWA Y BEARING & MACHINE, INC. 

BEARING & DRIVELINE SPECIALISTS 



JWm 


- MACHINE SHOP SERVICE - "O^ 

508 - 747-2800 ^^ 




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BOAT & TRAILER 






HYDRAULICS 


BOWER - BOA 






COMMERCIAL PUMPS & COMPONENTS 


C/H DISTRIBUTOR 






GRESEN 


FAG 






HYDRAULIC HOSE 


FLANGE UNITS 






LUBRICATION 


INDUSTRIAL 






ALEMITE SUPPLIES 


KOYO DISTRIBUTOR 






KENDALL 


MARINE CUTLAS 






FEL-PRO 


PILLOW BLOCKS 








SKF 






SEALS 


TIMKEN 






C/R DISTRIBUTOR 


TORRINGTON 






NATIONAL 
NATIONAL O-RINGS 


BELTS 






STEMCO 


DAYCO 






TRANSMISSION & REAR END 


DRIVELINE COMPONENTS 






EATON 


BORG-WARNER 






FULLER 


C/V SHAFTS 






ROCKWELL 


DETROIT 






SPICER 


FRONT WHEEL DRIVE AXLES 






TRANSMISSION & REAR AXLE 


HANGER BEARINGS 






REBUILDING KITS 


MOTOR MASTER UNIVERSAL JOINTS 






NEAPCO DISTRIBUTOR 






POWER TRANSMISSION 


PTO'S 






COMPONENTS 


PTO COMPONENTS 






DAYCO COMPONENTS 


ROCKWELL 






CHAIN 


SPIDER CLUTCHES 






MECHANICAL CLUTCHES 


SPICER-DANA 






PULLEYS 


UNIVERSAL JOINTS FOR ALL CARS 




RIGHT ANGLE DRIVES 


TRUCKS AND HEAVY EQUIPMENT 




SPROCKETS 


FILTERS 






AP 


BALDWIN DISTRIBUTOR 






HEAVY DUTY TRUCK 


EXHAUST 



SUPPLEMENTARY PRODUCTS 

BRONZE BUSHINGS • GASKET PAPER • HARDWARE • HELICOIL 

LOCKING HUBS • LOCITE • MORSE CABLES • POLLACK ALARMS 

— MAJOR SUPPUER AND MEMBER — 

CAPE COD CRANBERRY GROWERS ASSOCIATION • CAPE COD TURF MANAGERS ASSOCIATION 
MASSACHUSETTS LOBSTERMENS ASSOCIATION 



agencies has produced an evergrowing 
hodegpodge of regulatory activity, accord- 
ing to an association spokeaperRon. 

"We have really begun to son ■ ' " said 
James C. Wiers, president of Wieie /- 

Dutchmaid Produce, Willard, Ohio, and 
chairman of the meeting. "There was a tre- 
mendous spirit of cooperation among the 
participants at the meeting and a real desire 
to reach agreement." 

The 45 attendees represented a cross sec- 
tion of conventional agriculture, organic 
grower/shippers, trade associations, and 
state departments of agriculture and federal 
agencies. The final definition was achieved 
after discussion of the various existing 
definitions. 

Both United and the Organic Foods Pro- 
duction Association of America (OFPANA) 
had distribute i a survey to their members 
and other key agriculture representatives to 
pinpoint areas of concern and misunder- 
standing. Presentations were made by 
Robert DeSpain of Organically Grown Co- 
op, and Lynn Coody of Oregon Tilth, both 
Oregon-based and co-authors of the new 



CRANLAND 
SERVICES 

Cranberry Property 

Appraisals 

• ••••• 

Listings and Sales of 

Cranberry Properties. 

License # 68987 



La>vrence W. Pink 

Old Cordwood Path 

Duxbury, MA 02332 

(617)934-6076 



100 CAMELOT DR., PLYMOUTH, MASS. 02360 



Pump Repairs 
& Siales 

All Types 

• Field Service 

• Chemigation Equipment 
Sold 

• Demonstration by 
Appointment 

AAA Industrial 
Pump Service Inc. 

Bruce Sunnerberg 

66 Lake Street 

Plympton, MA 02367 

(617)585-2394 



CRANBERRIES October 1989 Page 21 



Senate bill just introduced in that state. 

Also presenting were Mark Lipson of 
r.ilifomia Certified Organic Farms, Larry 
D. Woodson of California Certified Organic 
Farms, Larry D. Woodson of the Kansas 
Board of Agriculture and Keith Jones of the 
Texas Department of Agriculture. 

The definition as finally approved is: 

I. Organic food production systems are 
based on farm management practices that 
replenish and maintain soil fertility by pro- 
viding optimal conditions for soil biological 
activity. 

IL Organic food is food which has been 
determined by an independent third party 
certification program to be produced in 
accordance with a nationally approved list 
of materials and practices. 

III. Organic food is documented and veri- 
fiable by an accurate and comprehensive 
record of the production and handling 
system. 

IV. Only nationally approved materials 
have been used on the land and crops for at 
least three years prior to harvest. 

V. Organic food has been grown, harv- 
ested, preserved, processed, stored, trans- 
ported and marketed in accordance with a 
nationally approved list of materials and 
practices. 

VI. Organic food meets all local, state and 
federal regulations governing the safety 
and quality of the food supply. 

At the next meeting of the group, guide- 
lines for certification organizations, the 
contents of the list of "nationally approved 
materials and practices," labeUng and the 
structure of a national review board will be 
discussed. 

The United Fresh Fruit and Vegetable 
Association is the leading trade organiza- 
tion serving the fresh produce industry. 
United's 2,500 member companies repres- 
ent grower/shippers, brokers, wholesalers, 
food service operators, retailers and alUed 
industry suppliers in the United States and 
24 countries around the world. 



The 

CHARLES W.HARRIS 

Company 

451 Old Somerset Avenue 
North Dighton, Mass. 
Phone (508) 824-5607 

AMES 

Antisyphon Devices 

RAINBIRD 

Sprinklers 

HALE 

Pumps 

Hiikut Qtttlhn Pfodiiefs 
Wlth$atitftetion GumnfMi 



BOOK BEING PREPARED 
ON CRANBERRY INDUSTRY 

The Plymouth Savings Bank and the 
Cape Cod Cranberry Growers' Association 
are sponsoring a book on the Massachusetts 
cranberry industry to be published early 
next year by Spinner Publications. 



Author of the book is Joe Thomas. Spinner 
is currently looking for old photos for the 
work. Anyone interested should contact 
Thomas at Spinner Publications, P.O. Box 
C-801, New Bedford, MA 02741. Or call (508) 
994-4564. 




Chain, Cable and Accessories 
Used for Making Mats 
I Types of Fasteners (BuIk & Packaged) 

Hand Tools Pumps 

Power Tools Motors 

Chemicals Abrasives 

Lubricants Cutting Tools 

Safety Equipment 



Richards Rd 
Plymouth Industrial Park 



747-0086 
Plymouth, MA 02360 





Krause Excavating, inc. 



canal work 

Pond Construction 



Ditching 
Land Clearing 



1-1/4-3 yd. draglines with 80' boom and matts, 2 yd. 
backhoe, swamp dozer and other related equipment. 



contact: 



Roger Krause 1-414-398-3322 
Route 3 iviarkesan. wis. 53946 



Page 22 CRANBERRIES October 1989 



22 years experience 



construction lifts 





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bulk bins 

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Branch Offices 

Middleboro Square, Rt. 28, Middleborough • Middleboro Plaza, Middleborough 
Cranberry Plaza, East Wareham • Carver Square, Carver • Trucchi's Plaza, Taunton 

Telephone all offices 947-1313 






CRANBERRIES October 1989 Page 23 



Take Good 

Care of Ifourself 

Have an Ocean Spray! 




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The farmer's cooperative that brings you 
a wide range of natural fruit juices, drinks and sauces 

Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc., Lakeville-Middleboro, MA 02349 
An Equal Opportunity Employer 




CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

November 1989 Vol. 53, No. 11 




Aminotriazole Scare: A Look Back 



coo i-O 



j..sy3Hwy 



or 



WCGA Gets Its h 
S 

Attic Yields Rich Cranberry History 



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Page 2 CRANBERRIES November 1989 



First Executive Director, New Prexy 
Discuss Cranberrying in Wisconsin 



By FRED POSS 

The cranberry business is a 
growth industry in more ways than 
one. At least, that's the impression 
you get when you talk to two "new 
kids on the block"— Tom Lochner, 
executive president, and Chuck 
Strozewski, president — at the 
Wisconsin Cranberry Growers 
Association (WCGA). 

"I think," says Lochner, the 
WCGA's first full-time director, 
"that the growers recognize that . . . 
there is a growing number of issues 
and that they need to bring some- 
body on to help coordinate efforts 
that they were doing through 
volimteer work." 

Lochner, a tall, serious, but very 
approachable individual, feels his 
background as former director of 
governmental relations for the 
Wisconsin Farm Bureau has helped 
prepare him for the issues confront- 
ing him in his new job. 

COVER PHOTO 
GEORGIA D. CHAMBERLAIN 
of Rochester, Mass., took first 
place in the harvest category 
for this photo. The contest was 
sponsored recently by the Cape 
Cod Cranberry Growers Associ- 
ation. 



CRANLAND 
SERVICES 

Cranberry Property 

Appraisals 

• ••••• 

Listings and Sales of 

Cranberry Properties. 

License # 68987 



Lawrence W. Pink 

Old Cordwood Path 

Duxbury, MA 02332 

(617)934-6076 



"A lot of them (issues) have to do 
with regulation by the state — from 
regulation of the use of pesticides 
to attempts to regulate the use of 
water," he says. 

Any recent "hot" topics, Tom? 

"There is also the issue of food 
safety, food quality," he replies. 
"With the Alar thing, a lot of agri- 
cultural people are very concerned 
about what that can do to you from 
the financial standpoint." 

Besides his awareness of the need 
for appropriate reaction and ade- 
quate preparedness on these issues, 
Lochner already has very definite 
ideas about how a new director can 
take the proactive lead for cran- 
berry growers in the state. 

"I think the growers have indi- 
cated that through education pro- 
grams and best management prac- 
tices and those types of things, that 
they don't have to create a situa- 
tion where they are going to be fac- 
ing a contamination," Lochner 
remarked. 

And the sources for the educa- 
tional programming he wants to 
design and implement are already 
identified, according to Lochner. 

"We will be working with the 



university on our cranberry school, 
some things that Ocean Spray has 
been working on as far as research, 
and the Cranberry Institute as far 
as nematodes ... all those types of 
things." 

Anything else in Lochner's new 
job description besides responding 
to issues and creating educational 
programming probably falls under 
public relations. 

"I think we are going to be doing 
some work with the legislature," he 
says. "Basically, what the (WCGA) 
board did at their last meeting was 
appoint three committees: an 
administrative committee to look 
at the organization, an education 
and public relations committee 
which will conduct a lot of those 
educational activities, and also a 
governmental relations committee 
which will work with the legisla- 
ture on things from property taxes 
to environmental issues." 

AND, as Lochner tackles public 
relations, issues and educational 
programming, one important face 
looking over his shoulder will 
probably be smiling, broadly. 

Chuck Strozewski, new WCGA 
president, is a happy man now that 




CONSULTING ENGINEERS 
SURVEYORS 



Extensive experience in all aspects of cranberry 
land development: evaluation, purchase, survey, 
design, permit acquisition, phased construction and 
planting both in wetlands and uplands. 

Have references. Will travel. 

Contact: Will Lee 

10948 Highway 54 East 
Wisconsin Rapids, Wl 54494 

(715)424-3131 



CRANBERRIES November 1989 Page 3 



his organization has seen fit to 
establish the new director's position. 

I've spent so much time traveling 
to meetings for the association," 
Strozewski explains, "that just for 
me alone — my car — my marsh — we 
certainly can use an executive 
director." 

And Strozewski believes there 
are some important advantages to 
all of the state's cranberry growers 
with the Lochner appointment. 

"Issues are better presented as a 
united front to the DNR or the 
legislature," he said. "This way we 
have a contact person rather than 
an answering machine." 

And the new director's back- 
ground in PCA and the Farm 
Bureau are only part of the reason 
Chuck believes Lochner is a good 
choice. Strozewski puts it succinctly: 
"He wants more people involved — 
wives, kids!" 

And, apparently, involvement in 
what you believe in is a big prereq- 
uisite for membership in the Stro- 
zewski family. 

"I'm not the newest guy on the 
block in the cranberry association," 
Chuck admits. "I was the vice pres- 
ident for the last two years." 

"And I've been elected state pres- 
ident of middle schools," interjects 
Mrs. Strozewski. 

Two ships passing in the night at 
times around the Strozewski house? 

"It takes a lot of understanding," 
was the reply. 

So while schedules, appointments, 
meetings and more interviews with 



Pump Repairs 
& Scales 

All Types 

• Field Service 

• Chemlgatlon Equipment 
Sold 

• Demonstration by 
Appointment 

AAA Industrial 
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Bruce Sunnerberg 

66 Lake Street 

Plympton, MA 02367 

(617)585-2394 



writers like this one continue to 
blossom on the cranberry calen- 
dars of the Lochner and Strozewski 
families, one end point in the Wis- 
consin story clearly has been 
reached. The WCGA isn't the 
mostly social organization it was 
in its earliest days nor is it a semi- 
professional one any more with a 
small group of dedicated volunteers 
putting in long hours. 



The WCGA under the leadership 
of President Chuck Strozewski and 
new Executive Director Tom 
Lochner has taken a quantum leap 
forward in 1989. And, as members 
of a totally professional organiza- 
tion now, the new kids on the block 
should be perfectly positioned to 
rspond both reactively as well as 
proactively to the business dynam- 
ics of the 1990's. 




General Excavating 



Pond Construction & Maintenance 
Land Clearing, Ditching, Canal Work 

Dragline (63' reach) & Clamshell 
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(508) 822-1085 




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Canal Work 

Pond construction 



Ditching 
Land Clearing 



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bacl<hoe, swamp dozer and other related equipment. 



Contact: 



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Route 3 Markesan, Wis. 53946 



Page 4 CRANBERRIES November 1989 







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CRANBERRIES November 1989 Page 5 



The Great Cranberry Scare 

They Also CaUed It Blaek & Blue Monday 

George C. P. Olsson Reminisces About 
The Aminotriazole Controversy of 1959 



By CAROLYN GILMORE 

It was a watershed date; a point in time which marks the course of 
events by a sharply distinct "before" and an equally dramatic "after." 
Thirty years ago, on Nov. 9, 1959, with little warning, a press announce- 
ment carried on national news virtually destroyed the cranberry market 
at its peak. For the next few years, consumer confidence in cranberries 
was at an all-time low. 

Spray president, vividly recalled the 
day from his Plymouth home this 
harvest. 

"I was just getting up when I got a 
telephone call from a manager who 
was attending a convention in New 
York," Olsson remembered. "He said 
he had learned that the Secretary of 
Health, Education and Welfare, 
Arthur Flemming, was about to make 
an announcement that was going to 
hurt the cranberry business or be very 
detrimental. He asked if I could get in 
touch with someone from Washing- 
ton and see what I could do about it." 
Olsson was able to get through to 
Congressman Hastings Keith and 
Senator Leverett Saltonstall, both 
from Massachusetts. He had hoped 
for a "48 or 24 hour" reprieve to allow 
the cranberry industry time to pres- 
ent its side of the issue, but Keith and 



ON THAT memorable day in '59, 
U.S. Secretary of Health, Education 
and Welfare Arthur S. Flemming 
announced that aminotriazole, used 
as a herbicide on cranberries in 
Oregon and Washington, had been 
found to cause cancer in mice. Since a 
batch of treated cranberries from the 
two states had already been distrib- 
uted in the market and could not be 
identified for isolation, the entire 
cranberry market from coast to coast 
was suspect during the biggest sales 
week. 

George C. P. Olsson, then Ocean 



CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

SEND CORRESPONDENCE TO: 

P.O. BOX 249 

COBALT CT 06414 

(203) 342-4730 

Fax #: (203) 342-1977 

PUBLISHER a EDITOR: BOB TAYLOR 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: CAROLYN GILMORE 
(508) 763-5206 

ADVISORS & CORRESPONDENTS 

MASSACHUSETTS — Irving E Demoranville. 
Director. Cranberry Ejtperiment Station, 

NEW JERSEY — Phillip E Marucci, Cranberry & Blueberry 
Specialist, Buddtown; Elizabeth G. Carpenter. Chatsworth 

NOVA SCOTIA — Robert A Murray. Horticulturist, Berry 
Crops. Research Station, Truro, 

OREGON — Arthur Poole, Coos County Extension Agent, 
Coquilte, 

WASHINGTON — A/mi Y Shawa, Horticulturist and 
retired Director. Coastal Washington Research & Extension 
Unit, Long Beach 

WISCONSIN — Tod D Planer. Farm Management Agent. 
Wood County 

CRANBERRIES is published monthly by Taylor Publishing, 2 
Freestone Ave . Portland, CT 06460 Second class postage is paid 
at the Portland, CT Post Oftice Price is $15 a year, $28 tor two 
years. $2 a copy in the U S : $17 a yearin Canada, $20 a year in all 
other countries Back copies $2 50, including postage Copyright 
1989 by Taylor Publishing, 

ISSN: 0011-0787 

Postmaster, send Form 3749 to: 

CRANBERRIES 

PO BOX 249 

COBALT, CT 06414 



Saltonstall only managed to hold up the 
announcement for "an hour or two." 

"Arthur Flemming bad a full-blown 
press conference," Olsson recalled. 
"It got on television and in all the 
newspapers that we had used a pesti- 
cide which was limited for use and we 
had abused the use. It practically 
stopped sales all over the country." 

THE NEWS meant a sudden career 
change for Olsson, a lawyer with 32 
years experience as administrative 
officer for Plymouth County, Mass., 
courts. He resigned his job, and, with 
Orrin G. CoUey, Cranberry Institute 
president, led growers in convincing 
President Eisenhower to grant an 
executive order to pay restitution for 
the lost crop. Olsson, who owned a 
60-acre cranberry bog in Middleboro, 
was serving his second year as presi- 
dent of Ocean Spray at the time. 

"We had meetings of growers ia 
Washington (D.C.) and it was finally! 
agreed that the Cranberry Institutei 
would be reactivated," Olsson said. 
"Orrin Colley, Marcus M. Uranni 
(Institute secretary and treasurer and 
newphew of Ocean Spray foundej 
Marcus L. Urann) and I went to 
Washington from then on ... . thal^ 
was November and sales bad come to 
a standstill. People were offering' 
cranberries for sale at 10 cans a dol 



2 Parcels in the Heart of 
Wisconsin Cranberry Country 

• 1,000 acres in Big Flats 

• 280 acres in Colburn 

Both in Adams County 

20 miles south of Wisconsin Rapids, Cranberry Capital of Wisconsin 

Details: Big Flats parcel is served by two streams, Dry Creek and Carter 
Creek. Colburn is served by Dry Creek. The area is comprised mainly of Wis- 
consin sand land. The land is level, with a high water level. Both properties 
are serviced by public highways and utilities. About 200 acres of the Big Flat 
property are former cleared field. There are some drainage ditches on the 
property. About 50 acres of the Colburn property are open field. Will Lee of 
Lamport, Lee & Associates, cranberry marsh engineers, is favorably 
impressed with the potential of the properties for cranberry development. 

I will consider cash, a long-term contract or a lease. 

Donald L. Hollman 

Hollman & Pollex, Attorneys at Law 

313 Main Street 

Friendship, WI 53934-0098 

(608) 339-3341 



J 



Page 6 CRANBERRIES November 1989 





i-l 



IN THIS 1960 PHOTO, George C. P. Olsson, center, then Ocean Spray president, presents the late 
U.S. Senator Leverett Saltonstall (R-Mass.) with a cranberry scoop in appreciation for his efforts to 
help the cranberry industry after the Great Cranberry Scare in 1959. Next to Senator Saltonstall is 
Marcus M. Urann, secretary and treasurer of the Cranberry Institute. At the left is Orrin G. Colley, 
Institute president. Next to him is Massachusetts Congressman Hastings Keith. 



lar. There was a glut on the market 
and we wanted to get them (cranber- 
ries) cleared of any suggestion that 
there was anything wrong with them." 



Wanted to Buy 

40 Tons of Stevens 

Vines for 

1990 Planting. 

Would Like to See 
Vines Now. 



Contact: Timothy Finch 
Rt. 3 
Box 320 

Black River Falls 
Wisconsin 54615 



Ocean Spray hired the testing 
laboratory, Arthur D. Little of Cam- 
bridge, Mass., to review and coordi- 
nate testing done on cranberries by 
their own chemists, the National 
Canners Association and the Food 
and Drug Administration. In the Feb- 
ruary 1960 issue of CRANBERIES, it 
was reported that the Cranberry 
Institute issued a release that less 
than 0.3% of berries tested showed 
any traces of aminotriazole residue. 

"I had been chosen spokesman for 
the group," Olsson said. "I set it up so 
that it was a political thing. I sent 
letters and telegrams to all the con- 
gressmen in the five cranberry grow- 
ing states. We would fly down to 
Washington once or twice a week, set 
up meetings with congressmen, go 
from office to office and plead for 
some help." 

Attorney Joseph Parker, who was 
familiar with obtaining a federal 



government indemnity from working 
with the poultry industry in a similar 
situation, was hired to represent the 
cranberry group. 

EZRA Taft Benson, Secretary of 
Agriculture, offered to help. 

"What we wanted was not help, but 
money," Olsson said. "For many 
growers, their only means of support 
was from cranberries. At that time, it 
was $12 to $13 a barrel. They could get 
by on that, but, of course, it looked as 
if they wouldn't get anything." 

Finally, on May 1, 1960, "we got to 
Eisenhower," Olsson said. "He issued 
an executive order for indemnity to 
cranberry growers which averaged 
$10 a barrel. At least, it was enough to 
keep them in business." 

For the next few years, sales were 

poor because consumer confidence was 

low. Cranberry leaders did, however, 

manage to get their crop included in 

(Please turn the page) 



CRANBERRIES November 1989 Page 7 



the school lunch program. 

"That was partially successful," 
Olsson related. "The government said 
it was not going to pay for sugar in 
cans of cranberry sauce, so the schools 
had to take raw cranberries. A lot of 
schools didn't have facilities and the 
know-how to cook cranberries." 

However, the school lunch program 
was enough to keep growers in busi- 
ness, as it absorbed a million or more 
dollars a year of the crop, Olsson said. 
"IT was a very interesting expe- 
rience, frustrating at times," the 
former Ocean Spray president said. 
"But to get a million dollars a year 
was a good result. The sales started to 
come back .... We were shocked by 
the thing. We were hit so hard on our 
backs. We came back with a lot of new 
things — labels, new products, juice. 
Growers were aware juice was a pos- 
sibility but I don't think the man- 
agement did." 

During Olsson's tenure, the com- 
mon stock was reorganized so that 
each member held stock in proportion 
to berries delivered. At that time, a 
name change was made from National 
Cranberry Association to Ocean 
Spray. 

"When I came on, I found the com- 
mon stocks were owned by growers, 
independents, brokers," Olsson said. 
"Under the law, I found it was not 
right. Coop shares were supposed to 
be owned by grower members. So we 
had to contract with growers to have 
a marketing agreement to sell cran- 
berries. It cost three to four million 
dollars to buy back shares at $25 a 
share, which was the par value. It was 
a big job. Stocks were all over the 
country. We had many takeover offers 
but growers wouldn't agree." 

Olsson was also involved in the ref- 
erendum to establish a Cranberry 
Marketing Order under the 1937 
Agricultural Marketing Agreement 
Act. The order was approved by an 85 
percent favorable grower vote in 
1962. Olsson was a charter member 
and the first chairman, serving 12 
years on the committee. 

The Cranberry Marketing Order 
originally served the industry as a 
tool to administrate surplus fruit. 

"That was a tough job," Olsson 
said, "because the independents were 
very much opposed. Anything we did 
was wrong." 

Olsson sold his bog in 1979 when he 
retired from Ocean Spray. His two 
grown sons had chosen careers in 
locations away from cranberry 
country. 



Page 8 CRANBERRIES November 1989 



ASKED what history has taught 
the cranberry industry, he is reminded 
of a statue of a horse and rider in 
Washington, D.C., with the inscrip- 
tion, "The past is prologue," or, as a 



taxi driver is said to have translated 
the inscription for a questioning tour- 
ist, "You've not seen anything yet." 

"Those who don't learn from his- 
tory live to regret it," Olsson added. 



COLC 



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Farm families count on him to provide the financial support they need— short- 
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But there's more to Farm Credit than money. What makes your Farm Credit 
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PC Box 7 
Taunton, MA 02780 
508 / 824-7578 




I 




I 




(Reprinted from the January 1960 issue 
of CRANBERRIES.) 

The cranberry industry is desperately in need of the help of 
everyone interested. We have been done a great injustice 
through the statement of Welfare Secretary Flemming and the 
subsequent adverse flood of publicity, which all but destroyed 
the market for cranberries. Legislation is being introduced in 
Congress for Federal aid. 

Among the reasons why cranberry people deserve the reim- 
bursement are: 

1. Secretary Flemming's pronouncement of November 9 
came without notice to the industry or even a hearing, just as 
the major part of the crop was about to go on to the market. 

2. This government action actually destroyed the cranberry 
market, probably for some years to come. 

3. Such governmental conduct is completely without prece- 
dent in America. 

4. This conduct resulted in economic disaster to thousands of 
innocent people. 

5. There was no sudden threat to public health. The com- 
pound, aminotriazole, was found in minute quantities in a few 
cranberries. It is found naturally without spraying in many of 
our common foods. Some of these foods are radishes, rutaba- 
gas, broccoli, turnips, mustard, cabbage, etc. We understand 
that a person would have to eat 2,200 lbs. of heavily sprayed 
cranberries to consume as much aminotriazole as is found in 
one turnip. 

6. A good authority is quoted as saying that what was called 
"cancer" in the now famous test rats was in fact not cancer 
tissue . . . 



(Reprinted from the February 1960 issue 
of CRANBERRIES.) 

It is perhaps not in good taste to mention only a few names, 
as many are working hard for the industry in its time of need. 
But certain ones are carrying the brunt of the burden. 

To name only three: (Cranberry) Institute President Orrin G. 
CoUey, secretary-treasurer Marcus M. Urann and George C. P. 
Olsson, president of Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc. and desig- 
nated spokesman for the industry, are spending unlimited time 
in Washington, quietly at work on the problem of redress. They 
are usually there from Monday to FViday of each week. 



Westvaco Announces 
Customer Seminars 

Westvaco Corp., a Fortune 200 company 
that manufactures paper, packaging and 
chemicals, is offering customers and key 
prospects three-day corrugated packaging 
seminars at its Container Division Techni- 
cal Center in Richmond, Va. 

For information, write to Ross Zachary, 
Marketing and Sales Manager, Westvaco, 
Container Division, P.O. Box 2941105, N. 
Charleston, SC 29411-2905, or call 
1-800-526-8778. 

BALLY NAMES REP 

Bally Engineered Structures Inc. of Bally, 
Pa., manufacturer of walk-in coolers, freez- 
ers and refrigerated warehouses, has named 
Forbes, Hever & Wallace of Houston as its 
manufacturer's rep in Texas and Okleihoma. 



FOR SALE 

Cranberry bog, 10 acres 
HANSON, MASS. 

Good producer, good 

water, no neighbor 

problem — ever. 

Ocean Spray member 
With upland, total 15 
acres approximately. 

Moved out of state, priced 
to sell 

$24,000 per acre, total 
$240,000 

(207) 255-8769 
Ask for Brooks 



L 



CRANBERRY 

GROWERS 

REALTY 

Listings of buyers and 

sellers ivelcomed on 

cranberry acreage 

and upland. 

Appraisals 

DOUGLAS R. BEATON 

E. Sandwich, Mass 

02537 

(617)888-1288 



CRANBERRIES November 1989 Page 9 



i vflV Ju tummwi i MlvmJ ' Jtfui^^ 



Spring 1990 




Vines For Sale 



Ben Lear 

Crowley 

Stevens 

Pilgrims 

LeMunyon 

Buy 10 tons, get one ton free. 
20% down payment with order. 



$3,700.00 per ton 
$3,500.00 per ton 
$3,500.00 per ton 
$5,000.00 per ton 
$5,000.00 per ton 

Prices F.O.B. 



Contact: 

LeRoy Miles 

Northland Cranberries, Inc. 

(715) 424-4444 

251 Oak Street 

Wisconsin Rapids, Wl 54494 




Page 10 CRANBERRIES Novemberl989 




UPRIGHTS like the one 
to the left make the 
bumper cranberry crops 
and there could be more 
of them at harvest time 
but for the insects . . . 



Know the Insects 

The major cranberry insects: cranberry girdler, the fireworms, 
tipworm, blossom worm, cranberry fruitworm and Sparganothis 
fruitworm. 

The periodic cranberry insects: cranberry scale, fire beetle, 
blossom weevil, armyworm and bluntnose leafhopper. 

Color photographs of all these insects and more are now arranged 
with text in a portfolio that is available. 

The portfolio endeavors to bring together the words of research 
complementing the photographs and making a summary of 
cranberry insect information that will be of use to the cranberry 
grower for a lifetime. 

The portfolio is available for $100 and, if you wish to examine a 
copy, telephone (609) 894-8556 evenings around 6 p.m. or write to: 

Walter Z. Fort 

P.O. Box 183 

Pemberton, NJ 08068 



: 



CRANBERRIES November 1989 Page 11 



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Hwy 51 & 73 Interchange 

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(715)335-6372 



Bruce Sunnerberg 

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66 Lake Street 

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NOTICE 

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Page 12 CRANBERRIES November 1989 




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* Experienced cranberry consulting service offering pheromone traps and 
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* Right to know training. 

* Culvert Pipe — All sizes — steel, aluminum, and poly. 

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* Sanding by helicopter. 



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CRANBERRIES November 1989 Page 13 



Research Center Attic Yields 
Historic Treasures 



By ELIZABETH CARPENTER 

Last year Dr. Erwin "Duke" 
Eisner had no idea what he would 
discover as he climbed the ladder to 
the storage area above Rutgers' 
blueberry/cranberry research cen- 
ter garage. Soon renovations were 
to begin that would transform this 
cinderblock cavern into a labora- 
tory and conference room. A major 
housecleaning could no longer be 
avoided. However, what began as a 
chore turned into an entomologist's 
delight and a librarian's windfall. 

THE dusty comers of the attic crawl 
space yielded old American Cranberry 
Growers' Association (ACGA) ledgers 
filled with entries dating back to the 
turn of the century, an insect collection 
containing some amazingly well pre- 
served specimens, notices of annual 
growers' meetings, and an ode, "To the 
Cranberry," which is printed below. In 
an Aug. 12, 1925 notice to New Jersey 
growers, Charles S. Beckwith wrote: 

The fifty-sixth annual convention of 
the American Cranberry Growers' 
Association will be held at the bog of 
Mr. Theodore Budd, near Pemberton, 
N.J., at 1 A.M. (DST) August 26, 1 925. 
The program at the bog will consist of a 
demonstration of airplane dusting of 
cranberry bogs and a demonstration of 
the cranberry picking machine. At one 
o'clock, luncheon will be served at Par- 
ish Hall, Pemberton, at $1 .50 per plate. 
Later the formal meeting will take place. 
The annual crop estimate, a talk on air- 
plane dusting and one on the cran- 
berry picker will be given. 

Mr. W.B. Mathewson of Quincy 
Adams, Mass., was scheduled to dem- 
onstrate the picking machine while 
Curtiss Flying Service Inc. planned to 
furnish the crop dusting plane. The 
meeting notice was sent from Browns' 
Mills, N.J., then the home of the cran- 
berry research facility. 

Records show that 19 years earlier, 
A.J. Rider, founder of Rider College in 
Lawrenceville, N.J. , and former ACGA 
secretary, noted at the conclusion of 
his Oct. 29, 1906 secretary's report: 
"The country is in a prosperous condi- 
tion and all kinds of produce are bring- 
ing good prices. Cranberries are not 
likely to be an exception." 

Duke Eisner, now unofficial histo- 
rian for the research center, knew these 
Page 14 CRANBERRIES November 1989 




JUDITH Olsen, Burlington County College 
librarian, looks at a cranberry growing bro- 
chure given her by Kenneth Samoil, program 
associate working with Dr. Erwin "Duke" 
Eisner, research center entomologist, and Dr. 
Eisner. The college welcomes additions to its 
special Pinelands collection. 

(CRANBERRIES photo by Elizabeth G. Carpenter) 



:>.*i .• V. 



J. A . JENKINS & SON CO. 

Grower Service 



MOWING (ALL TYPES) 
SANDING 



DITCHING 
WEED WIPING 



Serving Cape Cod 

227 Pine St., W. Barnstable, Ma. 02668 

Phone 362-6018 



myifstif^mffsfireist;^xfi^^ 



records, as well as multiple back issues 
of cranberry journals, were valuable 
components of Pinelands cranberry 
history. They should be shared with 
the public and deserved a haven, he 
thought. 

After receiving permission from 
ACGA leadership, the research center 
donated a selection of this historical 
material to the special Pinelands Col- 
lection of Burlington County College 
located in Pemberton Township, the 
home of four "cultivators of cranber- 
ries" in I860.' Here Judith Olsen, spe- 
cial services librarian, historian and 
lifelong Pinelands resident, will over- 
see cataloguing and care of these 
treasures. 

On behalf of the college, Olsen wel- 
comes donations of Pinelands-related 
artifacts, audio-visual aids and printed 
materials. Since its dedication on Nov. 
7, 1987, many students and researchers 
have visited the collection in their effort 
to learn more about our country's first 
national preserve, the New Jersey 
Pinelands. Cranberry and blueberry 
agriculture is an important part of the 
preserve. 
'Olsen, Judith Lamb and Malsburt, Glenn. 

Pemberton— An Historic Look at a Village on the 

Rancocas. New Orleans; Polyanthos, 1976. 

Marketing Order 
Hearings Slated 

David Farrimond, general manager 
of the Cranberry Marketing Commit- 
tee, announces that hearings on the 
proposed amendments to the Cranberry 
Marketing Order are scheduled for 
January and February. 

A USDA administrative law judge 
has been assigned as hearing officer. 

Hearings will be held in four growing 
areas on the following dates: 

Plymouth, Mass., Jan 17 and 18; 
Medford, N.J., Feb. 6; Wisconsin Rap- 
ids, Wise, Feb. 13; Portland, Ore., Feb. 
15. 

The Cranberry Marketing Commit- 
tee newsletter, which will contain 
proposed changes in the marketing 
order, will be sent to the 945 active 
cranberry growers in the U.S., Farri- 
mond said. 

C.G. 

CONSULT AMERICA MARKETS 
EUROPEAN FOOD & DRINK DATA 

ConsultAmerica, an international busi- 
ness consulting firm with offices in May- 
nard, Mass., has produced a three volume, 
database report on food and drink products 
for all 12 European Community countries. 



To The Cranberry 

Let others praise in fervent lays 

The plump Thanksgiving bird, 
And let them sing of leg and wing, 

With old Pegasus spurred 
Gntil his speed is great indeed 

And all is blithe and merry, 
But let me sing that splendid thing, 

The succulent cranberry. 

humble fruit, we've long been mute 

Gpon thy many charms! 
With nipping zest you do your best 

To ward dyspepsia's harms. 
Both sour and sweet you sauce the meat 

Your flavor does not vary. 
Retiring, coy, yet full of joy — 

O marvelous cranberry! 

About you hangs a taste that tangs 

The food that would be harsh, 
Your plump skin's filled with dew, distilled 

Above the sun kissed marsh. 
No grape, I'll say, of old Tokay 

Or from Oporto airy 
Drips with a wine as rich as thine. 

O excellent cranberry! 

Of ruby hue, a jewel, too, 

To grace the festal board. 
With lavish heart you give your part — 

Give all your spicy hoard. 
When eager lipped we've sat and sipped 

The juice, that vies with sherry. 
Ah, of the feast you're not the least. 

Mellifluous cranberry! 

So let them praise in lilting lays 

The turkey and the pie, 
But let me sing that splendid thing 
That makes the heart beat high. 

1 would not waste one shade of taste. 

I'd drain the dictionary 
To find more ways to sing the praise 
Of thee, O rare cranberry! 



The clipping of this poem was found in an American Cranberry Growers' 
Association ledger dating back to 1909. It was with other clippings, one of 
which was dated "Phila 4/7/10 Record." 



CRANBERRIES November 1989 Page 15 



REGIONAL 
NOTES 

MASSACHUSETTS 

By IRVING E. DEMORANVILLE 

The official crop estimate released by the 
New England Agricultural Statistics indi- 
cates that the Massachusetts crop will be 
1 ,820,000 bbls., 2 percent less than the 1 988 
record. Other figures; New Jersey, 340,000 
bbls., 8 percent less than the 1988 record; 
Oregon, 155,000 bbls., 1 percent more than 
the 1 988 record; Washington, 140,000 bbls., 
4 percent more than 1988, and Wisconsin, 
1,470,000 bbls., down 6 percent from 1988. 

Nationally, the crop is estimated at 
3,930,000 bbls., down 4 percent from 1988. 
Interestingly, the Cranberry Marketing 
Committee indicated that they are estimat- 
ing the Massachusetts crop at 1,904,000 
bbls., which would be a record. I lean toward 
the larger figure at this time. 



Dr. Robert Devlin of the Massachu- 
setts Cranberry Experiment Station 
attended the Plant Growth Regulator 
Society of America annual meeting in 
Arlington, Va., from Aug. 5-10. Bob 
presented a paper at the meeting. 

Dr. Frank Caruso attended the 



American Phytopathological Society 
annual meeting in Richmond, Va., 
Aug. 19-24. Frank presented a paper 
and was chairman of a paper session. 



The 102nd annual meeting of the Cape 
Cod Cranberry Growers Association was 
held at the Cranberry Experiment Station 
on Aug. 22. The morning was filled with a 
multitude of exhibits, the usual bog tour of 
research plots and the barbeque lunch. 
The afternoon was devoted to the business 
meeting, guest speaker and official USDA 



crop estimate. 

Officers and directors elected for the 
coming year were: Jeff Kapell, president; 
Dave McCarthy, first vice president; Bob 
Zaniboni, second vice president, and this 
writer, secretary/treasurer. Wayne Barnes 
and Kirby Gilmore are two new members 
of the board. They'll replace Dave Mann 
and Ben Gilmore, who were given a plaque 
for their service, as was outgoing presi- 
dent Doug Beaton. We will miss the direc- 
tors' advice and expertise in many areas, 
especially water problems and real estate 
taxes. We hope to see them often. 



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Page 16 CRANBERRIES November 1989 



WISCONSIN 

Kay A. Finch, Black River Fall*, John R. 
Rezin, Warrens, and Guy A. Gottschalk, Wis- 
consin Rapids, recently were elected to three 
year terms on the Wisconsin Cranberry Mar- 
keting Board. 



"I think that is alarming." 

Those were the words of Dr. Dean Stueland 
of the National Farm Medicine Center in 
Marshfield, which conducted a two year study 
of farm injuries in central Wisconsin. The 
study found that nearly 20 percent of victims 
were younger than 16. 

Weather 

MASSACHUSETTS 

August was warm and wet. We averaged 
1.5 degrees a day above normal. Maximum 
temperature was 85 degrees on the 22nd 
and the minimum was 46 degrees on the 
27th. There were no exceptionally warm or 
cool days, but nights averaged considera- 
bly warmer than normal. 

Rainfall was 5.99 inches or about ^V> 
inches above normal. There was measura- 
ble rain on 10 days with 2.19 inches on the 
11th and 12th as the greatest storm. This 
was the 1 1th wettest in our records. We are 
SVz inches above normal for 1989 and about 
bVz inches ahead of 1988. 

The summer (June-August) was about 4y4 
inches wetter than normal. 

I.E.D. 



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CRANBERRIES November 1989 Page 17 



Cranberrying to 
Get Underway in 
Maine Next Year 

The commercial cultivation of 
cranberries on a big scale — a dream of 
some of those who attended a state 
sponsored forum on cranberrying in 
Augusta, Me., in the summer of 1988— 
decidedly isn't right around the comer. 

However, a small start on cranberry 
growing will begin in the spring of 
1990. 

Slated for planting are a 4 acre bed in 
Trenton and another 5 acre site in 
Jonesboro. 

Both bogs will be located in nonwet- 
land, upland areas, adjacent to water. 
Maine is highly protective of its 
wetlands and won't approve bogs 
located in them. 

The source of information about these 
latest developments was Brooks 
Holmes, who is a consultant for the 
Trenton project. 

HOLMES, who is selling his bog in Han- 
son, Mass., has moved to Machias, Me., 



where he owns a pub/restaurant and con- 
ducts an irrigation and consulting business 
for growers. 

Holmes owns that progress in introduc- 
ing cranberrying to Maine "was slower 
than we thought." But he believes there will 



be a steady, albeit slow development, of 
small sites. 

"Large sites would put you into bone 
gravel and get into the wetlands," Holmes 
says. 

Holmes, an Ocean Spray grower, says 



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spreading equipment, and 
flow gates or flumes is 
something we do that can be 
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Page 18 CRANBERRIES November 1989 



slow, steady development in Maine is inev- 
itable, what with a growth in the need for 
cranberries and the comparative lack of 
room for expansion in Massachusetts. 

He believes development is more likely in 
coastal than in central Maine because of 
warmer winters along the coast and because 
blueberry processors are located there. The 
state of Maine had been thinking of inland 
development as a means of relieving unem- 
ployment in the region. 

Holmes says the state Department of 
Agriculture, the Eastern Maine Develop- 
ment Corporation, the universities of Maine 
and Massachusetts and the Blueberry 
Experiment Station in Jonesport, Me., all 
have been helpful in getting development 
underway. 

Pest Control Front 

National Study 
Foreshadows a 
Shift Away 
From Chemicals 

A recent report by the National 
Academy of Sciences saying that crop 
yields on farms using natural methods 
and little or no chemical application are 
as great or greater than on farms rely- 
ing heavily on chemicals is expected to 
have an impact on agricultural practi- 
ces and federal farm policy, according 
to experts. 

The report is based on a study paid 
for in part by the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture. 

"Well -managed alternative farms use 
less synthetic chemical fertilizers, 
pesticides and antibiotics without 
necessarily decreasing, and, in some 
cases, increasing per-acre crop yields 
and the productivity of livestock 
systems," said the report, titled 
"Alternative Agriculture." 

"Wider adoption of proven alternative 
systems would result in ever greater 
economic benefits to farmers and 
environmental gains for the nation," 
the report added. 

The report's authors suggested 
changing federal subsidy programs 
that encourage the use of chemicals. 
They also said the USDA should hike 
spending for research on natural farm 
methods from $4.45 million to $40 mil- 
lion in 1990. 

Not everyone greeted the report 
warmly. 

Thomas E. Wadlinger, a spokesper- 
son for the Fertilizer Institute, said: 
"The farms that the academy selected 
to study were already determined to be 
successful in deploying alternative 



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CRANBERRIES November 1989 Page 19 



agriculture practices. It's like saying 
they're not going to pay attention to 
those who have tried it and failed. 
Whenever questions are raised about 
productivity and yield, they say that's 
no problem, but there is no proof for 
that conclusion." 




chilled Spiced Fruits will deliciously 
complement your turkey duet. 

And to begin your Thanksgiving 
feast, Cranberry Soubise Soup is the 
perfect choice. A delicately creamy 
puree of fresh cranberries and onions, 
this elegant soup, served either hot or 



cold, will subtly enhance the taste buds 
for the gustier flavors to come. 

Whether your decorative plans call 
for a formal dining room setting — or a 
gracious buffet — your twin turkeys, 
generously garnished with fruits and 
greens, on either one or two platters, 



%* 'i?"* 



POLE 



SERVICE 



Cranberries Flavor 
Twin Turkeys For a 
Doubly Tantalizing 
Thanksgiving Feast 

Oh glorious Thanksgiving! All the 
beauteous bounty harvested from our 
land surely makes this holiday the 
most treasured and nostalgic of our 
American heritage. It is hardly an 
exaggeration to say that almost all 
Americans deem it their inalienable 
right to have turkey, dressing and 
cranberries on this day. And so we 
shall — but in new and delicious 
versions. 

Rather than follow the tradition of 
serving one giant bird, why not try a 
new approach? Serve two small tur- 
keys. Your twin turkeys will be easier 
to store, handle, season — and, happily, 
will roast in less time. But even more 
exciting, they can be prepared in a duo 
of delectable tastes made possible by 
the versatility of our very own native 
cranberry. 

After seasoning and stuffing, roast 
your birds as usual. But just 30 minutes 
before the birds are done, anoint each 
with two very different cranberry 
glazes. Both are simply mixed and 
ready to use ahead of time. 

Glaze your first "twin" with a savory 
Cranberry-Maple Sauce. This bird, 
dressed with a Fruited Fresh Cran- 
berry Stuffing, will have tremendous 
appeal for those whose palates crave a 
succulently sweet flavor. For your 
second turkey taste-sensation, use 
Cranberry Soy Sauce for glazing. This 
"twin," appropriately stuffed with a 
spicy Cranberry Bacon dressing, will 
be relished for its piquancy. A bowl of 

Page 20 CRANBERRIES November 1989 



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CRANBERRY TWIN TURKEYS 

Make the two stuffings and the two sauces 
for glazing as directed. Stuff each turkey 
with a different stuffing just before placing 
them into the oven. Sprinkle turkeys inside 
and out with salt and pepper. Stuff turkeys 
and sew or skewer opening. Place turkeys 
on a rack side by side in a shallow roasting 
pan. If turkeys become too brown, cover 
with foil tents. Roast turkey at 350"F. as 
usual. Thirty minutes before turkeys are 
ready, spoon over half of each of the glazes. 
Remove from oven and place turkeys on a 
large platter. Spoon remaining glazes over 
turkeys again, garnish with parsley sprigs 
and green grapes. 

CRANBERRY-MAPLE 
GLAZE SAUCE 

(Enough glaze for 10 pound turkey) 

1/2 cup melted butter or margarine 
1 teaspoon maple flavoring 
1 tablespoon cornstarch 

1 cup cranberry juice cocktail 

In a saucepan, mix butter, maple flavoring 
and cornstarch. Gradually stir in cranberry 
juice cocktail. Stir over low heat until sauce 
bubbles and thickens. 

CRANBERRY FRUITED STUFFING 

(Enough stuffing for 10 pound turkey) 

1/2 cup butter or margarine 

2 large onions, chopped 

1 can (11 ounces) mandarin oranges, 

undrained 
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg 

1 loaf (1 pound) bread, cut into cubes 

2 cups fresh cranberries 

1 teaspoon salt 

2 teaspoons poultry seasoning 
1/4 teaspoon black pepper 

In a large skillet, melt butter and saute 
onions until golden. Stir in remaining 
ingredients. Mix well and use mixture to 
stuff turkey. If any stuffing is left over, it 
may be baked in a greased casserole for 1 
hour. 



CRANBERRY SOY GLAZE SAUCE 

(Enough glaze for 10 pound turkey) 

1 can (1 pound) jellied cranberry sauce 
1/4 cup soy sauce 

1 teaspoon garlic powder 
1/4 cup sherry 

Press cranberry sauce through a sieve and 
stir in remaining ingredients. 

CRANBERRY BACON STUFFING 

(Enough stuffing for 10 pound turkey) 

1/2 pound bacon, diced 

2 cups chopped celery 

2 cups shredded carrots 
4 cups bread cubes 
1 cup cranberry juice cocktail 
1 teaspoon salt 

1 cup chopped parsley 

In a large saucepan, fry bacon until crisp. 
Saute celery and carrots in bacon drippings 
until wdlted. Stir in remaining ingredients. 
Use mixture to stuff turkey. 

SPICED FRUITS 

(Serves 6 to 8) 

2 cups fresh cranberries 
1/2 cup sugar 

1/2 cup water 

Juice of 1 orange 

2 cups stemmed, seedless green grapes 

1 pear, cored and diced 

2 cups diced canned peaches 
2 cinnamon sticks 

8 whole cloves 

In a large saucepan, mix cranberries, sugar, 
water and orange juice. Bring to a boil, 
lower heat and then simmer 5 to 6 minutes 
or until cranberries are tender. Stir in 
remaining ingredients and let stand until 
cool. Chill until ready to serve. When ready 
to serve, remove whole spices. Recipe can be 
doubled to feed a larger group. 

CRANBERRY SOUBISE SOUP 

(Serves 6 to 8) 

1/2 cup butter or margarine 
6 large onions, chopped 
2 cups fresh cranberries 

1 pint half-and-half 

2 cups milk 
Salt and pepper 



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Hanson, MA 02341 



In a large saucepan, heat butter and saute 
onions and cranberries until onions are soft 
but not brown. Pour half of the onion mixture 
and half-and-half into a blender and whirl at 
top speed until smooth. Mixture may appear 
curdled before blending. Repeat with 
remaining onion mixture and half-and-half 
Pour into saucepan again and stir in milk. 
Heat until bubbly. Season to taste with salt 
and pepper. Can also be served icy cold. 
Recipe can be doubled to feed a larger group. 




A MEMORABLE Thanksgiving 
table laden >vith twin turkeys — 
each with a different cranberry 
glaze and stuffed with its very 
own sauce and dressing. A 
creamy Cranberry Soubise Soup 
and Cranberry Spiced Fruits all 
combine for this fabulous holi- 
day feast. 



Sandoz Official Says 
System Needs Changes 

Olav Messerschmidt, director of biotech- 
nology affairs for the Sandoz Crop Protec- 
tion Corporation, recently told the 74th 
annual meeting of County Agricultural 
Agents in Somerset, N.J., that changes in 
the regulatory system governing the devel- 
opment, testing and use of pesticides could 
help restore consumer confidence in the 
nation's food supply. 

"U.S. cancer rates are declining and our 
regulatory process guarantees Americans 
the safest food supply in the world," Mes- 
serschmidt remarked. "But there is always 
room for improvement and we are not 
opposed to change." 

Messerschmidt said potential 
improvements could include compulsory 
training and certification of chemical 
applicators, enforcement of existing civil 
penalties against pesticide misuse, and 
additional funding to increase analyses of 
fresh produce. 

CRANBERRIES November 1989 Page 21 




'SHOULD I TAKE IT OUT OF REVERSE, DEAR?' 



NEW PRODUCT INFO 

Two portable microscopes designed for 
horticulture use are available from RF 
Inter-Science Co. Designed to fill the need 
for superior image quality in a reasonably 
priced instrument, these wide-field units are 
also camera adaptable. Two models are 
available — Macroscope 2, a fixed magnifi- 
cation unit, and Macroscope 18-36 Zoom, a 
unit providing variable magnification. Both 
portable units can be taken into the green- 
house and used for on-the-spot identifica- 
tion of plant lesions or insects. 

******** 

The Du Pont Company has developed a 
program of reusable and returnable con- 
tainers for some of its pesticides. A com- 
pany spokesman said the program was 
developed because growers and applicators 
are concerned about the enviromental impact 
and added costs of container disposal. 



Statement ol Ownership. Management and Circulation, 
Required by 39 USC 3685 1 Title of Publication Cranberries 
2 Date ol filing Sept 14, 1989 3 Frequency ot issue 
monthly 3A No of issues publishedannually 12 3B Annual 
subscription price $15 4 Complete mailing address of 
known office of publication 2 Freestone Ave , Portland, Mid- 
dlesex County CT 06480 5 Complete mailing address of the 
headquarters of general business offices of the publisher 
same 6. Full names and complete mailing addresses of pub- 
lisher, editor and managing editor publisher, Robert Taylor, 
Wellwyn Drive, Portland CT 06480; editor, same; managing 
editor, same 7 Owner Robert Taylor, Wellwyn Drive , Port 
land CT 06480 8 Known bondholders, mortgagees, and 
other security holders owning or holding 1 percent or more of 
totalamount of bonds, mortgagesorothersecurities none 9 
not applicable 10 Extent and nature of circulation (average 
no copies each issue during preceding 12 months and actual 
no copies of Single issue published nearest to filing date) A 
total no copies. 650 and 650; B paid circulation (1 sales 
through dealers and carriers, street vendors and counter 
sales, and 0) and (2 mail subscriptions, 592 and 615), C 
total paid circulation 592and615.D free distribution by mail, 
carrier or other means, samples, complimentary and other 
free copies and E total distribution, 592 and 615, F 



copies not distributed (l office use, left over, unaccounted. 
spoiled after printing, 58 and 35) and (2. returns from news 
agents, and 0), G total 650 and 650 I certify that the 
statements made by me above are correct and complete 
(Signed) Robert Taylor. Publisher/Editor 




The 

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451 Old Somerset Avenue 
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Phone (508) 824-5607 

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Page 22 CRANBERRIES November 1989 




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EAU CLAIRE 
1700 Western Avenue 
Phone (715) 835-5157 



MADISON 
Highway 51 & Buckeye Rd. 
Phone (608) 222-4151 



GREEN BAY 
600 Liberty Street 
Phone (414) 435-6676 



SUPERIOR 
1213 Winter Street 
Phone (715) 392-2243 



ESCANABA 
430 N. Lincoln Street 
Phone (906) 786-6920 



MILWAUKEE 
11715 W. Silver Spring Rd. 
Phone (414) 461-5440 



CRANBERRIES November 1989 Page 23 



Take Good 

Care of Yourself 

Have an Ocean Sprajr! 




^-?ansp^^^ 



The farmer's cooperative that brings you 
a wide range of natural fruit juices, drinks and sauces 

Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc., Lakeville-Middleboro, MA 02349 
An Equal Opportunity Employer 




CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

December 1989 Vol. 53, No. 12 




Rutgers Research Lab Expands 



Baked Gnods Firm R"«^* Ar^...,^ d^-~, 

S 



£00X0 yW 

isyaHwy 



Cranberries a H.v ... cm lOUcciii 



For A . . . 



Give A 

^^ Cranberry Insect^ ^ 

Portfolio 



Know the Insects 

The major cranberry insects: cranberry girdler, the fireworms, 
tipworm, blossom worm, cranberry fruitworm and Sparganothis 
fruitworm. 

The periodic cranberry insects: cranberry scale, fire beetle, 
blossom weevil, armyworm and bluntnose leafhopper. 

Color photographs of all these insects and more are now arranged 
with text in a portfolio that is available. 

The portfolio endeavors to bring together the words of research 
complementing the photographs and making a summary of 
cranberry insect information that will be of use to the cranberry 
grower for a lifetime. 

The portfolio is available for $100 and, if you wish to examine a 
copy, telephone (609) 894-8556 evenings around 6 p.m. or write to: 

Walter Z. Fort 

P.O. Box 183 

Pemberton, NJ 08068 



Page 2 CRANBERRIES December 1989 



EJ Feeds lne< 



Successful IBaked §oods Gompany Starts lAp 
On IProverhial Shoestring and jBox oflBerries 

By JOAN RUSSELL 

Everybody makes a cranberry muffin now and then. 

And, during the hoUday season, you find a cranberry nut bread in almost any bakery. 
But try to find commercially produced, cranberry baked goods year-round at any supermarket or fast food 
chain store. 
That's the market Jose Moniz and Bea Reale decided to tackle. 

TWO YEARS ago, armed with 
the proverbial shoestring, a hand- 
ful of recipes and a small supply of 
cranberries, they originated BJ 
Foods in Hanson, Mass. 

Their first product was a cran- 
berry cake equivalent of carrot cake 
or banana cake. 

Then came Bea's Cape Cod 
Cranberry Cake with Lemon 
Orange Glaze made from an old 
recipe that Bea's mom used. 

The latter cake was packaged in 
boxes and sold to several local 
supermarket chains for their freezer 
sections. But Moniz quickly changed 
strategy when he found this aspect 
of the business wasn't profitable. 

"We decided to market the cake 
fresh to specialty stores and small 
supermarkets," he says. "We found 
a 20 to 30 percent increase in sales 
per store when we did this." 

Jose and Bea learned the com- 
monplace demands of small busi- 
ness: long hours and holiday work. 
And they did everything them- 
selves: bake, market, sell, deliver. 

Their hard work paid dividends. 
( Soon they were able to hire help. 



COVER PHOTO 
DR. ERWIN ELSNER, speciaUst 
in entomology at the Rutgers 
UniverBity blueberry /cranberry 
,re8earch center, is focusing his 
research at present on the 
tsparganothis fruitworm. For a 
^story about cranberry research 
in New Jersey and more photos 
of the staff at the expanded 
^research center, turn to page 8. 

(CRANBERRIES photo by Elizabeth G. Carpenter) 




EMPLOYEES fold cranberry cake boxes at the BJ 
Foods plant in Hanson, Mass. 

(CRANBERRIES photo by Joan Russell) 



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CRANBERRIES December 1989 Page 



In an effort to attract customers 
year-round, BJ Foods offered a var- 
iety of cranberry nut breads mixed 
with seasonal fruits. During the 
spring and summer, the company 
markets cranberry orange and 
cranberry lemon nut breads. In the 
fall and winter, cranberry pump- 
kin and cranberry caraway nut 
breads are sold to complement the 
season. 

The nut breads are wrapped by 
the slice and sold to food services, 
including one that supplies Logan 
Airport and convenience stores. 
Moniz hopes to market products to 
the school food service industry in 
the near future. 

Besides the aforementioned baked 
goods, BJ Foods also has developed 
cranberry sweet bread rolls, cran- 
berry chocolate chip cookies, cran- 
berry oatmeal cookies, and even 
cranberry bread pudding. 

The company's baked goods line 
is marketed under the trade name 
Bea's. 

GROWTH has been so steady 
and good that the company will 
soon move from its present 2,000 
square foot facility in Hanson to a 
25,000 square foot plant in New 
Bedford, Mass. 

"The new facility will be cen- 
trally located near the areas where 
we market the products . . . south- 
ern Massachusetts, Cape Cod, 
Connecticut, Rhode Island and 
Boston," Moniz said. 

Baking is now done manually. In 
New Bedford, the operation will be 



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JOSE MONIZ keeps an eye on a 120 quart mixer 
used for mixing dough at BJ Foods. 

(CRANBERRIES photo by Joan Russell) 



completely automated. And staff 
will be increased from five to ten, 
leaving Jose and Bea more time to 
focus on administrative tasks. 

Many new products are in the 
offing. Currently being developed 
in a joint venture with a liquor 
company is a line of cranberry 



liquor cakes. These include a cran 
berry rum cake with pineapple, 
cranberry cognac cake and a crar 
berry bourbon cake. 

"I like to keep a new product iii 
mind all the time," says Reale. "Wl 
develop our own recipes througi 
trial and error until they are trull 



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Page 4 CRANBERRIES December 1989 



good products." 

The company also is back to 
dealing with large supermarkets. 
This time it is to sell their freezer 
departments a cranberry cake as a 
special holiday item. 

B J FOODS buys approximately 
I 90 percent of its cranberries from 
Ocean Spray. This year the com- 
pany used 150,000 pounds of cran- 
berries alone. 

Much of the feedback regarding 
its success comes to BJ Foods via 
, letters written by tourists who visit 
Cape Cod. Letters containing kudos 
about their baked goods have 
arrived from as nearby as Water- 
town, Conn., and from as far away 
as Nova Scotia. 

FERTILIZER COMPANY 
I PRODUCES NEW VIDEO 

I IMC Fertilizer of Northbrook, 111., has 
[produced an 1 1-minute video, "Facing Facts 
About the Future of Agriculture," that the 
company is making available to interested 
groups and individuals. 

In part, the video deals with alternative 
methods of farm management. 

Single copies of the brochure and video 
can be obtained by contacting Dr. Lindsay 
Brown at IMC Fertilizer Inc., 501 East 
Lange St., Mundelein, IL 60060. 




BEA REALE & JOSE MONIZ pause for a chat during 
inspection of an oven at B J Foods. 

(CRANBERRIES photo by Joan Russell) 



CRANBERRIES 

THE NATIONAL CRANBERRY MAGAZINE 

SEND CORRESPONDENCE TO: 

P.O. BOX 249 

COBALT CT 06414 

(203) 342-4730 

Fax #: (203) 342-1977 

PUBLISHER & EDITOR: BOB TAYLOR 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: CAROLYN GILMORE 
(508) 763-5206 

ADVISORS & CORRESPONDENTS 

MASSACHUSETTS — Irving E, Demoranville, 
Director, Cranberry Experiment Station, 

NEW JERSEY — Phillip E. Marucci, Cranberry & Blueberry 
Specialist. Buddtown; Elizabeth G Carpenter, Chatsworth 

NOVA SCOTIA — Robert A Murray, Horticulturist, Berry 
Crops, Research Station. Truro. 

OREGON — Arthur Poole. Coos County Extension Agent. 
Coquille- 

WASHINGTON — Azmi Y. Shawa, Horticulturist and 
retired Director. Coastal Washington Research & Extension 
Unit. Long Beach 

WISCONSIN — Tod. D, Planer. Farm Management Agent, 
Wood County. 

CRANBERRIES is published monthly by Taylor Publishing, 2 
Freestone Ave , Portland, CT 06480 Second class postage is paid 
at the Portland, CT Post Ottice. Price is $15 a year, $28 for two 
years, $2 a copy in the U S , $1 7 a year in Canada: $20 a year m all 
other countnes Back copies $2 50, including postage Copyright 
1989 by Taylor Publishing 

ISSN 0011-0787 

Postmaster, send Form 3749 to: 

CRANBERRIES 

P O BOX 249 

COBALT. CT 06414 




THIS BJ Foods ad is for Bea's Cape Cod Cranberry Cake. 



CRANBERRIES December 1989 Par 



REGIONAL 
NOTES 

MASSACHUSETTS 

By IRVING E. DEMORANVILLE 

Members of the Massachusetts Cranberry 
Experiment Station staff that attended the 8th 
International Cranberry Research and Exten- 
sion Workers Conference at Corvallis and 
Bandon, Ore., Sept. 20-23 were Dr. Anne Ave- 
rill, Dr. Frank Caruso,, Dr. Robert Devlin, Dr. 
Irena Zbiec, Carolyn Demoranvllle, Martha 
Averill and this author. 

The first day of the conference was spent in 
and around Corvallis where the highlight was 
a tour of the USDA Germplasm Repository. 

We also visited the Tyce vineyard and win- 
ery, a peppermint farm, a blueberry field and 
a farm that produced grass seed. The 
remainder of the day was spent in traveling to 
Bandon. The balance of the conference was 
held in and around Bandon. 

The group visited 10 cranberry operations 
plus the Ocean Spray receiving station the 
second day. The third day was reserved for 
presenting papers and a poster session. There 
were 22 talks and five posters given. 

The final morning we visited one bog and 
then met in a number of group sessions by 
specialty: insects, diseases, soils and fertiliz- 
ers, weeds and growth regulators, and plant 
breeding. A short business meeting to decide 
on the time and place of the next meeting 
wound up the proceedings. 

The spouses attending were treated to two 
excellent tours of the Bandon area while the 
research and extension people were busy. 
There were probably 50 people in attendance 
and it was particularly satisfying to see many 
younger people there. 

Until someone has had to be the ramrod for 
a meeting like this, they have no conception 
of the work and planning involved. So my 
sincere thanks to Art and Toni Poole, John 
Hart, Bernadine Strik, Kris Wilder and all of 
the people at the Germplasm Repository. To 
all of the others on the team, forgive me for 
not noting you individually, but be assured 
that the kind thoughts are for you also. 

On a personal note, it was wonderful to visit 
with friends from the past, especially Jim 
Chandler, Ray Hopper and Dave and Jeanette 
Brooks. 



Some dry harvesting began soon after Labor 
Day but berries were miserably small. 

Size did Improve as the month progressed 
but was only average for the Early Blacks. 
Color was good but not outstanding. No frost 
warnings until the 24th and then on the 27th. 

Quality of Early Blacks Is on the weak side. 
Crop only about 30 percent harvested by Oct. 
1, but came In fast after that. 

There were some outstanding crops. How- 
ever, most growers are slightly or more under 
estimate. 

There Is a good Howe crop. 

II appears that the crop Is not a record, but 

Page 6 CRANBERRIES December 



probably near the USDA August estimate, 
maybe a little below. 

OREGON 

Despite rain— sometimes heavy— the Ban- 
don Cranberry Festival attracted the most 
people ever, according to police. 

This year's queen was Darcie Elliott. Prin- 
cesses were Kristi Hofess, Mandy Scott and 
Kim Gore. 

There were more than 80 entries in the 
parade. 



WASHINGTON 

Champion fiddlers, surrey rides, a chim- 
panzee, several llamas, a play and bog tours 
were among the highlights of llwaco's sixth 
Cranberry Festival. 



WISCONSIN 

Federal regulatory and environmental offi- 
cials, staff from the U.S. Congress and 
members of the Army Corps of Engineers 
recently heard cranberry growers tell of how 



they preserve the environment by protecting 
wetlands and setting aside undeveloped 
woods and fields around their marshes. 

Speaking to the visitors at Ken Rezin Cran- 
berries in Cranmoor were Russ and Karen , 
Rifleman. 

"Cranberry growers support President 
Bush's 'no net loss of wetlands' proposal," 
said Russ Rifleman. "In fact, we are making 
the president's goal of saving wetlands— at 
no expense to taxpayers — a reality." 

"The cranberry growers are obviously 
attuned to a number of environmental con- 
cerns," said Col. Roger Baldwin of the Army 
Corp of Engineers. 

BIOTECH PREXY CALLS 
FOR TAX LAW CHANGES 

Dr. Jerry Caulder, Mycogen Corp. presi- 
dent and CEO, recently told the House Sub- 
committee on Science, Research and Tech- 
nology that the research and development 
tax credit should be restored to make U.S 
industry more competitive. 

The head of Mycogen, a company engaged 
in the development of biopesticides, saic 
that current tax laws inhibit the start-up oi 
high technology companies. 



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New Jersey 

Expanded Research Center Team 
Tackles Nagging Problems 



By ELIZABETH CARPPENTER 

Ernest W. Bowker, the American 
Cranberry Growers' Association 
(ACGA) president, greeted New Jer- 
sey growers on a recent rain free 
August morning, a rarity during a 
season of record breaking precipita- 
tion. The question for the summer of 
'89 was not "how much rain," but 
"where to put it," as reservoirs and 
streams filled to the brim. 

DESPITE the deluge, Bob Batta- 
glia of New Jersey's Agricultural Sta- 
tistics Service brought growers encou- 
raging news. Crop projections, he said, 
indicate a harvest of 340,000 barrels, 
with overall berry size ranging from 
medium to large. Although production 
will be down about 8 percent from last 



year's record crop, it is 21 percent more 
than the 1987 yield. 

Ray Samulis, Burlington County 
agricultural agent, reviewed symptoms 
of vine dieback and suggested ways of 
controlling it. Caused by phytophthora 
fungus, three phases of the disease's 
progress in cranberry bogs include: 

• appearance of small, grayish-colored 
areas of vines in bogs; 

• lesions on stems and vines turn 
brown and darken; 

• stems and underground runners 
totally darken. 

Spread of the disease is enhanced by 
extremely wet conditions and, when an 
area is infected, plant tissue may be 
completely destroyed. 

Two recommendations made by Dr. 
Frank Caruso, extension plant pathol- 



ogist with the University of Massa- 
chusetts, are being tested in New Jer- 
sey: application of Ridomil and bog 
sanding. Caruso cautioned that posi- 
tive results from Ridomil application 
may not be seen for approximately 18 
months. 

Sanding on New Jersey bog test plots 
has yielded unexpected results, with 
disease control being better on 
unsanded "check" plots than on sanded 
plots. 

DR. ERWIN ELSNER, specialist in 
entomology at the Rutgers University blue- 
berry/cranberry research center, updated 
growers on his integrated pest management 
(IPN) research as it relates to sparganothis 
fruitworm, a hardy pest that appears to be 
able to overwinter in flooded bogs. 

Research in 1990 will begin with a spray 
when moths are in flight. The results of this 



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Page 8 CRANBERRIES December 1989 



Photos of New Jersey Research Center Team 



(Elzabeth G. Carpenter, Photographer) 





DR. NICHOLI Vorsa (right), 
associate director, and Dr. Erwin 
Eisner, specialist in entomology, 
examine one of Vorsa's many 
blueberry bushes used in the 
research center's extenstive 
breeding programs. 





DR. Leo Bruederle, a botanist, 
is a recent addition to the 
research center team. 







JOHN Sarracino, "hands on" 
plant breeder, is Dr. Nicholi 
Vorsa's assistant. 




DR. ALLAN Stretch, long-time 
USDA plant pathologist, will 
be devoting an increased 
amount of his time to field dis- 
ease research. 



CRANBERRIES December 1989 Page 9 



year's research suggest a single early appli- 
cation may have the greatest impact. Con- 
trol is very difficult once eggs hatch and 
worms infest the berries, Eisner said. Dam- 
age from the growing worms increases even 
though the population remains stable. 
Although the infected fruit may fall off the 
vine in July and August, the berries still 
float and end up as part of the harvest. 

Eisner noted that a second application, or 
"revenge spray," has little impact on this 
voracious pest, since most worms remain 
inside the berries, untouched by a later 
application. Next year's research efforts 
will benefit from tests and sampUng con- 
ducted on high yield commercial bogs. 
Development of sampling techniques for 
eggs, application timing, and efforts to 
identify most effective control products are 
three key tasks in future IPM research 
related to sparganothis fruitworm. 

DAVID Farrimond, Cranberry Market- 
ing Committee general manager, presented 
growers with a slightly more optimistic crop 
report of 360,000 barrels, 20,000 barrels 
higher than the total projected by the New 
Jersey Agricultural Statistics Service. 

He went on to remind growers that their 
marketing order representatives were Joseph 
Darhngton, Stephen Lee III, Alvin Brick Sr. 
and Charles Thompson. Marketing Com- 
mittee hearings are scheduled for January 
and February 1990 and will focus on 
amendments related to base quantity as 
well as financial support for industry -related 
research and production. 

DR. ROGER Wyse, senior associate 
director of the New Jersey Agricultural 
Experiment Station, told growers that the 
blueberry /cranberry research center receives 
funding from four sources: the state legisla- 
ture, special congressional grants, the agri- 
cultural research service and Ocean Spray. 
This funding supports 12 to 15 faculty 
members involved in cranberry and blue- 
berry research. 

A considerable amount of the team's future 
effort will be directed toward finding 
methods to minimize the impact of pesti- 
cides while maintaining high crop produc- 
tivity. Some of the team members include 
Dr. NichoU Vorsa, who will continue his 
plant breeding and genetic research. Dr. 
Erwin Eisner, who will continue to head 
integrated pest management efforts. Dr. 
Allan Stretch, who will devote an increased 
amount of his time to field diseases, and Dr. 
?aul Eck, who will continue his water man- 
ager "^nt experiments. Wyse also noted that, 
in addition to increased staff, the research 
center now has expanded laboratory facili- 
ties and a ntw conference room. 

A SOMBER note clouded morning reports 
of industry progress as Edward V. Lipman 
led growers in paying tribute to Hobart 
Gardner, an Indian Mills grower who was 
recently killed in a heavy equipment acci- 
dent. The 75-year-old Gardner will be 
remembered for his commitment to New 
Jersey's cranberry industry, as well as his 
community service. 

After lunch, growers adjourned to the 
research center bogs, where they had an 



Page 10 CRANBERRIES Decemberl989 




CHRIS Constantelos, senior lab 
technician, continues to assist 
Dr. Stretch with his plant dis- 
ease research. 



opportunity to examine the productivity 
and coloring capability of different cran- 
berry varieties, compare the impact of 
sprinkler irrigation for simimer tempera- 
ture control on sanded and unsanded bogs. 



and evaluate the effectiveness of different 
herbicides for control of red root in test 
plots. 

They also had a chance to tour the new 
facilities at the expanded research center. 




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CRANBERRIES December 1989 Page 13 




Cranberries Get Lots of Exposure 

We cannot remember another year in the decade we have 
been publishing CRANBERRIES that we have seen so much 
news and so many newspaper and magazine features about the 
berry. 

The Daily Tribune (Wisconsin Rapids, Wise), Chinook 
Observer (Long Beach, Wash.), Western World (Bandon, Ore.) 
and the Wareham Courier (Wareham, Mass.) all carried long 
stories about the harvest as well as fine photos, many of them 
in color. 

Amtrak travelers who happened to pick up the October /No- 
vember issue of Amtrak Express saw an article, "Native 
Sauce," by J. Wandres, which begins: 

"The cranberry has been with us from our beginnings on this 
continent, as much a part of our festivities as turkey or com. 
Henry David Thoreau, that archetypal American, called cran- 
berries 'perhaps the prettiest and certainly the most novel and 
interesting berry.'" 

We must admit that our interest in the story was heightened 
by the fact that CRANBERRIES received a mention. 

The reasons for the fascination of the cranberry are not so 
mysterious. Its unique culture is one of them. So is its bright red 
color. And the fact that it is so native a fruit. 

There are a substantial number of books about the cran- 
berry, which keep an interest in the fruit alive. Ever hear of 
books on other fruits? Ever hear of books about the lemon? Or 
the kumquat? 

Latest entry on the book scene is "Cranberries from A to Z: 
An Educational Picture Book" by Ann Kurz. Kurz, a Wisconsin 
artist and author knows her cranberries, a fact that is obvious 
from a reading of this delightful children's book. 

Each page contains bright watercolor paintings, devoted to 
cranberry culture and to a single letter of the alphabet. On the 
"M" page, for example, the child reads: 



and 



McFarlin berries are 
Magnificent! 

Marsh 
Managers 
Must be 
Mechanically 
Minded 




AGGIE HALL OF FAME 
INDUCTS 3 LEADERS 

The Agricultural Hall of Fame and 
National Center in Bonner Springs, Kans., 
recently inducted Dr. Curtis Fletcher Mar- 
but, Dr. Marion Dorset and Jerome Increase 
Case. 

Marbut, chief of the U.S. Soil Survey, 
1913, was the founder of the present system 
of soil classiflcation and mapping that is 
used throughout the world. He died in 1935. 

Dorset developed the vaccine which erad- 
icated hog cholera throughout the nation. 
Dorset also died in 1935. 

Case, who died in 1891, was the founder of 
the J.I. Case Co. He was called the "thresh- 
ing machine king." 

CAULDER NAMED HEAD 
OF BIOTECH ASSOCIATION 

The Industrial Biotechnology Association 
recently named Jerry D. Caulder, president 
and CEO of Mycogen Corporation, as its 
chairman. 

Caulder's election took place at IBA's 
eighth annual meeting, held this year in 
Washington, D.C. 



Wanted to Buy 

40 Tons of Stevens 

Vines for 

1990 Planting. 

Would Like to See 
Vines Now. 



Contact: Timothy Finch 
Rt. 3 
Box 320 

Black River Falls 
Wisconsin 54615 



CRANBERRY 

GROWERS 

REALTY 

Listings of buyers and 

sellers welcomed on 

cranberry acreage 

and upland. 

Appraisals 

DOUGLAS R. BEATON 

E. Sandwich, Mass 

02537 

(617)888-1288 



Page 14 CRANBERRIES December 1989 



Cranberry 
Sales Up in 
Caribbean 

By LEWIS MANUEL MEDINA 

"Could you pass the cranberry sauce, 
please?" 

Decades ago, those words were 
unheard in the Caribbean. Today the 
sales of cranberry products are up. 
Why? 

One major reason is that Americans 
are taking vacations closer to home. 
And the Eastern Caribbean or West 
Indies Region is benefitting from that 
fact. 

According to the Barbados based 
Caribbean Tourism Association, the 
number of tourists in 1988 was 10 mil- 
lion. And that number is expected to 
continue growing. 

Most of those tourists are Americans, 
followed by Canadians. More Ameri- 
cans mean that more hotel restaurants 
are serving cranberries and cranberry 
juices. With the importation of more 
cranberries, more natives become 
familiar with the fruit. 

Another factor is the large migration 
of Caribbean natives to the U.S. About 



2.85 million Puerto Ricans live on the 
mainland. So do about 1.7 million from 
other places in the Caribbean. About 2 
million people in Puerto Rico had once 
lived in the U.S. 

Among the influences of all this travel 
has been a familiarity with cranber- 
ries. Those who have lived in the U.S. 
or return to visit their homeland expect 
to find cranberries in Puerto Rican 
supermarkets. Hence, availabihty of 
cranberry products increases. 

The most common cranberry products 
are fruit drinks, including both cran- 
berry and mixed drinks. 

How much is consumed? That's hard 
to say since cranberries are not a local 
crop nor are they processed locally, so 
little track is kept of them. 

What is known is that Puerto Rico 
provides the biggest market, followed 
by the U.S. Virgin Islands, Bermuda, 
the Bahamas and the Cayman Islands. 

Respectably increasing their 
consumption are the British Virgin 
Islands, Anguilla, Saba, Saint Eusta- 
quius. Saint Marteen, Saint Martin, 
Aruba, Bonaire and Curazao. 

Other nations with still low 
consumption are the Dominican 
Republic, Jamaica, Saint Kitts and 
Nevis, Antigua and Barbuda, Domin- 
ica, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent, Tri- 
nidad and Tobago, Guyana, Venezu- 



ela, Panama and Costa Rica. 

For those cranberry wholesalers, 
exporters and processors looking for 
more export opportunities, two directo- 
ries could be very useful. One is the 60 
page Barbados Directory. The other is 
the volmninous 424 page Puerto Rico: 
Business to Business Executive Guide, 
which covers most of the Caribbean. 

Both books can be obtained from 
Allied Publications, PO Box 388, Lares, 
Puerto Rico 00669-0388. 



CRANLAND 
SERVICES 

Cranberry Property 

Appraisals 

• ••••• 

listings and Sales of 

Cranberry Properties. 

License # 68987 



Lawrence W. Pink 

Old Cordwood Path 

Duxbury, MA 02332 

(617)934-6076 




CRANBERRIES December 1989 Page 15 



30 



^o 



IRRIGATION VIDEO MADE 

A video, "Micro-Irrigation Management," 
has been made available to the agriculture 
industry by the Coachella Valley and 
Riverside-Corona resource conservation 
districts in California. 

Among subjects dealt with in the video 
are water contamination, soil types, algae 



buildup, improper installation, salt intru- 
sion, root and insect infestation and pH 
water values. 

For information about the video, write 
Coachella Valley Resource Conservation 
District, 80-975 Indio Blvd., Suite B-11, Indio, 
CA 92201 or call (619) 347-7658. 



P}iilip H. Gibbs, third generation 
Massachusetts grower, was the subject 
of the cover story in CRANBERRIES. 
South Carver resident Gibbs, first vice 
president of the Cape Cod Cranberry 
Growers Association, told editor 
Clarence J. Hall, "I don't expect to 
make a million dollars growing 
cranberries, but I intend to stay in the 
business as long as I can make a liv- 
ing." Gibbs served in the Merchant 
Marine during World War II. 

^t ifc 3ft 3fe }(( ^ 

The industry gathered statistics 
about the falloff of sales due to the 
aminotriazole scare. Consumer 
purchases of canned goods during the 
week of Nov. 15-21 had dropped 79% 
from the prior year. The decline for 
fresh cranberries was 63%. Still, those 
figures were better than those of the 
previous week, when Arthur S. Flem- 
ming, U.S. Secretary of Health, Educa- 
tion and Welfare, had provoked the 
scare. 

****** 

J. Richard Beattie, extension cran- 
berry specialist, wrote that adequate 
supplies of both seasonal and full-time 
workers continue to be a problem. "The 
major alternative is greater mechani- 
zation of the entire industry," Beattie 
said. 



Miss Judy Keene of Onset, Mass., 
was crowned "Miss Cranberry High- 
way of 1960." 

Weather 

MASSACHUSETTS 

■September was slightly on the warm side, 
t. ^Q 0.5 degrees a day above normal. 

Maximuii. . mperature was 85 degrees on the 
10th and the minimum was 34 degrees on the 
28th Generally, the last week of the month 
was cool, with part of the second and third 
week warm, wet and humid. 

Rainfall totaled 5.23 inches, nearly 1'/^ 
Inches above normal. There was rain on 12 
days, with 2.17 inches on the 1 6th-1 7th as the 
greatest storm. This was the wettest Sep- 
tember since 1977. We are about 5 inches 
above normal for the year and 8'/2 inches 
ahead of 1988. 

I.E.D. 

Page 16 CRANBERRIES December 1989 



Financial Strength. . . 

Personalized Service. 

Isn't That What You Need In A Bank? 



The Jackson County Bank 
has supported agriculture in the 
area for more than 1 1 years. 

We recognize the importance 
of the cranberry industry and are 
pleased to provide financial ser- 
vices for all your banking needs. 



We're large enough to serve 
you and yet v\/e offer personal- 
ized service which your busi- 
ness demands. Call us at 715- 
284-5341 

The Jackson County Bank. A 
name to count on throughout 
the years. 



II&Mj hk ih cU||etoa. 




JACKSON 
COUNTY 

n lk%Mt£ Membet FDIC 



Black Aiver Fills. Alms Ccnici. Hiilon. Meitillin. Tiylor. Wl Hi\i 



Vines For Sale 

Spring 1990 Delivery 

Ben Lear $3,700 a ton 

Stevens $3,500 a ton 

Crowley $3,500 a ton 

$500 ton less with 50% down by April 1 

Spring 1991 Delivery 

Ben Lear $3,100 a ton 

Stevens $2,900 a ton 

Crowley $2,900 a ton 

Bergman $3,100 a ton 

Le Munyon $3,000 a ton 

Pilgrim $3,100 a ton 

The above low prices are available with a $500 down payment by April 1, 1990 

David Zawistowski 
6031 County Highway D (715) 479-4658 

Eagle River, Wl 54521 (715) 479-6546 



YANKEE 
PLANNERS, 
INC. 

59 North Main Street 

Middlehoro, MA 02346 

(508) 947-0527 



Sound and Objective 

Advice 

Suited to 

Your Needs 



Do You Know . . . 
How the Government 
will value the assets in 
your estate? Do you 
know what transfer 
taxes will be due? Do 
you know how they 
will be paid? Do you 
know that with 
effective planning 
these taxes can be 
significantly reduced? 



Mr. William H. Bestgen, Jr. 

Chartered Financial Consultant 



Mr. Peter W. Hutchings 

Attorney at Law practicing as 
a Tax Attorney 



Mr. Roger H. Parent, Jr. 

Accountant, Enrolled to Practice 

before the Internal Revenue 

Service 



Call For Your Free Brochure 

(508) 947-0527 




'I KNOW THEY'RE CRANBERRIES. THEY'RE 
BETTER THAN A MISTLETOE!' 



WANTED 

Gravel & Sand 

in the southeastern Massachusetts area 
Quantities of 10,000 yards and up 

Complete site work, bog construction and finished con- 
touring of surrounding area plus the best price for your 

material. 

Michael Coan Earle White 

(508) 866-5285 (508) 359-7291 



Distributors of: 




1 



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™ "Cut Your Watering 
In Half" 



CRANBERRIES December 1989 Page 17 



Wisconsin Growers 
Fund Grad Student 
Research & Study 

By ELDEN J. STANG 

Cranberry research in the department 
of horticulture at the University of 
Wisconsin recently received a sig^nifi- 
cant boost through the generosity of a 
number of Wisconsin cranberry 
growers. 

Among those growers were Frank 
and Betty KoUer, Leasure-Koller Cran- 
berry Co., Manitowish Waters. A 
ceremony of appreciation and recep- 
tion for the couple was held Sept. 6 at 
the horticulture department on the 
University of Wisconsin/Madison 
campus. 

Cranberry growers, cranberry 
industry representatives, administra- 
tors of the UW/Madison College of 
Agricultural and Life Sciences and 
department faculty, staff and students 
joined in expressing appreciation to 
the Rollers for a major contribution of 
$100,000 to initiate the Frank B. Roller 
Century II Cranberry Fund in memory 
of their son. 

A plaque was presented to the Rollers, 
which reads, "In appreciation for the 
Frank B. Roller Century II Cranberry 
Fund in memory of Frank B. Roller 
1947-1978, endowed by Frank R. and 
Betty J. Roller." 

The plaque will be permanently on 
display in the department, along with 
recognition for other major contribu- 
tors to the Horticulture 2000 Centen- 
nial Fund drive, currently in progress. 

FRANK AND BETTY ROLLER, 
through the Koller Family Foundation they 
established, have generously supported 
many significant civic activities and pro- 
jects. Among them are a carillon and tower 
for their local Manitowish Waters 
Community Church, the purchase, lands- 
caping and equipping of a public park, con- 
struction of the new Frank B. Koller Memor- 
ial Library in Manitowish Waters, a veterans 
memorial recognizing all area veterans of 
the armed services, and a permanent scho- 
larship ftind for a local high school student 
♦ •i *tend a vocational school of his or her 
choii.^ 

The library, elegantly designed for its 
northwoods setting, is recognized as the 
outstanding facility in the Northwest Wis- 
consin library system. 

Recognizing the need for psychiatric care 
in the area, more recently the Koller Foun- 
dation established and funded the Frank B. 
Koller Outpatient Mental Health Center at 
the Howard Young Health Care Center in 
Woodruff, Wise. 

Their most recent contribution to fund 
graduate student training and research at 

Page 18 CRANBERRIES December 1989 




FRANK AND BETTY KOLLER, Leasure- 
Koller Cranberry Co. Inc., Manitowish 
Waters, Wise, took a moment to pose during 
a reception recognizing their endowment of 
the Frank B. Koller Century II Cranberry 
Fund for graduate student education and 
research in the Department of Horticulture 
at the University of Wisconsin/Madison. 

(Photo by Elden J. Stang) 



UW/Madison recognizes the need for long- 
term support to ensure that the teachers, 
researchers and extension faculty of tomor- 



row have a working knowledge of cranber- 
ries, one of the most important specialty 
crops of Wisconsin's agricultural economy. 





CONSULTING ENGINEERS 
SURVEYORS 



Extensive experience in all aspects of cranberry 
land development: evaluation, purchase, survey, 
design, permit acquisition, phased construction and 
planting both in wetlands and uplands. 

Have references. Will travel. 

Contact: Will Lee 

10948 Highway 54 East 
Wisconsin Rapids, Wl 54494 

(715)424-3131 



TWO Century II Cranberry Funds, in the 
:^inount of $150,000 each, were originally 
proposed as a part of the Horticulture 2000 
Development Fund drive initiated at the 
start of the UW Department of Horticul- 
ture's Centennial celebration in October 
1988. The Development Fund drive will con- 
tinue through 1989 and beyond. 

The Century II Cranberry Funds are spe- 
cifically intended to provide support for 
graduate student education and research 
programs to benefit the Wisconsin cran- 
berry industry. 

Support for students is to be continuing 
and long-term well into the next century, 
since only the interest on the funds will be 
utilized. With current interest rates, at least 
$150,000 is required to generate $15,000 
annual interest, the approximate amount 
needed to support a graduate student for one 
year. 

Funds are managed by the University of 
Wisconsin Foundation. Research projects 
assigned to these graduate students will be 
reviewed for their apphcability by a com- 
mittee of Wisconsin cranberry growers and 
University of Wisconsin faculty. 

THE very significant KoUer family con- 
tribution is a major step toward completion 
of one of the Century II Cranberry funds. 
Other Wisconsin cranberry growers, includ- 
ing Newell and Helen Jasperson, Habel- 
man Brothers Cranberries Inc., R.S. Bra- 
zeau Cranberries Inc., Olson Brothers 
Cranberry Co. and Biron Cranberry Co., 
have also contributed generously to a second 
Century II fund. 

A program is planned to recognize these 
contributions on completion of that second 
fund. 

The department of horticulture expressed 
appreciation for the generosity of Wiscon- 
sin's cranberry industry as well as hope for 
continued contributions to complete both 
Century II funds at the earliest possible 
date. 



Pump Repairs 
& Scales 

All Types 

• Field Service 

• Chemlgatlon Equipment 
Sold 

• Demonstration by 
Appointment 

AAA Industrial 
Pump Service Inc. 

Bruce Sunnerberg 

66 Lake Street 

Plympton, MA 02367 

(617)585-2394 



Great Bog SandS 

Right from the Heert of Cranberry Country 

Reserve your supply now for winter delivery 
(depending on ice) or we will stockpile at your bog 

anytime. 

Very Competitive Price 

Call Today 

1-800-696-SAND 

Casoll Sand & Gravel Inc. 

P.O. Box 750 

Hanson, MA 02341 



WOLLSCHLAGER EXCAVATING 

Dragline Work — All Kinds 
Also Have Clam & Scalping Buckets 

Route 1 Necedah. m 54646 

1-668-565-2436 



Vines For Sale 

Ben Lear $5,000 a ton 

Stevens $4,000 a ton 

Crowley $4,000 a ton 

Bergman $4,000 a ton 

Prices are F.O.B. 
$500 a ton less with 50% payment before cutting 



Richberry Farms Ltd. 



11280 Meiiis Drive 
Richmond, B.C. 
V6X 1L7 Canada 



Res. (604) 273-4505 
Bus. (604) 273-0777 



CRANBERRIES December 1989 Page 19 



Charles and Barbara Adams 



Cranberry Antiquing Enriches 
Their Appreciation of History 




ginia Washburn. The family had bogs 
on Rochester Road (South Carver)." 

CHARLES has been cooperating with 
curator Mary Anne Thompson in setting up 
a cranberry museum in Chatsworth, N.J. 
Because he is always on the prowl for 
antiques, he has also been able to find old 
scoops, labels, long handle rakes, dibbles, 
historic books and the like for Massachu- 
setts growers. 

"Predominantly professional and better 
educated people" are interested in antiques, 
he noted. "It is a very expensive business 
and prices are hard . . . you buy something 
because you like it." 

He finds that people around the country 
are interested in cranberries. 

"A lot of people in other parts of the coun- 
try have a historic heritage in New Eng- 
land," he said. "If their ancestors came from 
the Cape or Plymouth County, cranberries 
fall right in there." 



MANAGERS, APPRAISERS 
HOLD 60TH CONVENTION 

Seminars on American farm policy, trade 
and the environment highlighted the 60th 
annual gathering of the American Society 
of Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers 
(ASFMRA) in Savannah, Ga., recently. 

About 800 members attended. 

Founded in 1929, ASFMRA has some 
4,000 members. 



Mycogen Announces 
Blotoxin Discovery 

San Diego's Mycogen Corp. recently 
announced that company scientists have 
discovered novel strains of the bacteria 
Bacillus thuringiensis (B.t.) that are toxic to 
plant parasitic nematodes. 

"Plant parasitic nematode control repre- 
sents a potentially significant market with 
a clear need for alternative technologies," 
said Dr. Leo Kim, Mycogen's chief technical 
officer and vice president of research. 

A recent Society of Nematologists survey 
found plant parasitic nematode damage 
exceeds $77 billion annually. 



CHARLES Adams, collector of 
cranberry antiques, poses w^ith 
a Makepeace scoop. 

(CRANBERRIES photo by Carolyn Gilmore) 

By CAROLYN GILMORE 

For Charles and Barbara Adams, 
their avocation in antiques is an oppor- 
tunity to travel, to research, to meet 
new people and to participate in his- 
tory, both oral and written. 

The Middleboro, Mass., couple are 
authorities on early American baskets 
and Bennington pottery, for which they 
are in demand as lecturers, suppliers of 
materials for books and appraisers. 
Antique cranberry equipment also fig- 
ures in their stock. 

Charles, who knows many Massa- 
chusetts growers, retired two years ago 
"1 Farm Family Insurance and now 
opera u,. -^ general insurance company. 
Barbara has taught second grade for 
33 years. Weekends find them anti- 
quing anywhere from Vermont to 
Pennsylvania. 

Charles said antique dealers "carry 
a lot ofone-of-a-kind material. We spend 
a great deal of time searching sources." 

A fondness for antiques grew out of a 
childhood closely associated with bogs. 

"As a kid, I scooped bogs," the Mid- 
dleboro man says. "My aunt was Vir- 
Page 20 CRANBERRIES December 1989 



COLC 



WISCONSIN CRANBERRY 
HEADQUARTERS FOR 
SEVINXLR 

DEVRINOL 10G * EVITAL ♦ GUTHION 
DIAZINON 14G ♦ PARATHION * ETHREL 



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537 Atlas Ave., P.O. Box 7211, Madison, Wl 53707 
(608) 221-6204 or 1-800-362-8049 



HYDRAULICS 



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Assemblies & Fittings 

* Large Inventory of 

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* Engineering service for 

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^ Pumps, Motors, Valves 

FREE ESTIMATES 



HYDRAULICS, INC. 




103 Middleboro Rd., E. Freetown, MA 02717 

(508) 763-5567 

SALES • SERVICE • ENGINEERING 




PINELANDS GETS PRAISE; 
COURT VERDICT UPHELD 

During a recent visit to the Pinelands, 
New Jersey's cranberry growing region, 
U.S. Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan said 
the Pinelands Plan could become "a model 
for other places in the country." 

Said Lujan: "For a long time I've had an 
interest in the whole Pinelands experiment, 
even when I was in Congress. It's a new way 
of preserving lands by good state and fed- 
eral cooperation." 

A New Jersey appeals court recently 
upheld a Superior Court judge's ruling in 
favor of the Pinelands Plan that restricts 
new, nonfarm housing to one home for 
every 40 acres in an Agricultural Produc- 
tion Area. 

Landowner Hobart Gardner had contended 
that the restriction constituted a partial tak- 
ing of his property. The appeals court said it 
was "satisfied that Pinelands farms are 
uniquely ecologically sensitive, and that 
measures fairly designed to bar unsuitably 
intensive developmentare thereby justified." 

A fund for the reforestation of the Pine- 
lands has been estabhshed by the Pine- 
lands Commission in behalf of Kathleen M. 
Lynch Van de Sande, an environmental 
speciahst with the commission who died in 
an auto accident. The resolution estabhsh- 
ing the fund noted Van de Sande's "love of 
the New Jersey Rnelands and commitment 
to its preservation." 



Market Research Firm Says 
Juice Industry Future Bullish 

Buoyed by a strong national interest in diet and fitness, the $10.9 billion juice and 
juice-drink industry will continue to be healthy. 

So said FIND/SVP, a market research and consulting firm, m a recent report. 

The New York city company predicted growth over the next five years will equal 
the five year period from 1983 to 1988, when the overall market for firuit and 
vegetable juices and drinks grew by 35% firom $8 bilUon in sales. 

Nonpowdered fi-uit and juice drinks are the fastest growing market segment. The 
category achieved a 17.8% compound annual growth rate from 1983 to 1988 and 
presently accounts for 23% of retail sales, while growth is expected to average fi-om 
6% to 7 5% a year through 1993. The report noted that sales of juice dnnks are 
expected to exceed those of 100% pure fruit juices sometime withm the next decade 

FIND/SVP attributes the fruit drink category's success to an mcreasmg array ot 
exotic flavors, more convenient packaging, such as single-serve contamers, and a 
consumer preference for natural, "healthy" ingredients. At the same time, many 
consumers perceive 100% firuit juices as "heavy" and most regard them primarily as 
breakfast beverages, the report said. , ^ , j„7 . u ^^„* 

Regionally, the strongest sales potential lies in the South and West, where current 
juice consumption is lowest. In the South, consumption of juices and juice drinks on 
a per capita basis is only half that of the Northeast, which boasts the highest 

nationwide consumption. _i- • „ +v,^ 

Adult female homemakers are still the primary target of jmce advertising, the 
report noted. More than 80% of all households consume orange jmce, which makes it 
the most widely consumed of any juice. Twenty percent of households are heavy 
users, consuming orange juice more than twice a week. TTie report also found that 
20% of all households regularly consume firuit juices or dnnks other than orange 
juice. 



CRANBERRIES 

from 




32 pages of colorful watercolor paintings of 
blossoms, berries, harvesting, winter and 
summer scenes depicting all aspects of 
cranberry culture, equipment and lore with 
accompanying short text. The large letters 
are appropriate for children. Every age 
child and adult can learn from this book. 
The glossary of cranberry terms wdll allow 
adults to enrich the educational experience. 

"A classic book!" - Dr, Donald Boone 
International Cranberry Consultant 

Author/ Artist Ann Kurz is noted nationally among 
cranberry growers for her accurate portrayal and 
knowledge of cranberry culture. 



$13.95 



plus $2 skipping & harMmg 



Anil Kur/ 



send check or money order to: 

CRANBERRIES 

P.O. Box 249 
Cobalt, CT 06414 



An Educational Picture Book 



Name . . . 
Address 
City .... 



State 



Zip 



CRANBERRIES December 1989 Page 21 




saucepan and crush with potato 
masher. Sprinkle half of sugar over 
the fruit. Cover and stand over- 
night to draw out the juice. Next 
day add peeled, cored, finely 
chopped apple and bring to boil. 
Add remaining sugar and juice of 
the lemon and boil steadily until 
jam will set when tested. Pour into 
warm, dry jars and seal when 



cooled. 
This recipe makes a splendid gift" 




Cape Cod Jam 

This recipe is reprinted from The 
Cranberry Connection: Cranberry 
Cookery with Flavour, Fact and 
Folklore by Beatrice Ross Buszek. 

3/4 lb. gooseberries 
1/2 lb. cranberries 
3 cups sugar 
1/2 lb. cooking apples 
1 lemon 

Remove cases from gooseberries 
before weighing. Put fruit in large 




General Excavating 



Pond Construction & Maintenance 
Land Clearing, Ditching, Canal Work 

Dragline (63' reach) & Clamshell 
Gradall 6' Bucket D-8 Dozer 

Road Grader 

Bill Conway 

228 W. Brittania St. 

Taunton, MA 02780 

(508) 822-1085 






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I 



K Ag Laboratories International, Inc. 

2323 Jackson Street 
Oshkosh, Wl 54901 



Serving Cranberry 
Growers in U.S.A. 
& Canada since 1984 

Over 20 years 
of Experience on 
Acid Soil Interaction 



K Ag Laboratory has 
run over 30,000 
cranberry soil and over 
17,500 cranberry vines 
tests since 1984, and 
gave fertilizer 
recommendations with 
great success. 






* Cranberry Soil Analysis 

* Cranberry Vine Analysis 

* Cranberry Water Analysis, 
Usage & Interpretation 

* Liquid & Dry Fertilizer 
Recommendation 

* Soil Problems & Consultation 

* Seminars 

* Cranberry Crop Monitoring 
Program, testing and 
monitoring nutrient status 
with 30 day intervals during 
the growing season. 

Highly computerized cranberry soil, tissue and water testing program in 
U.S.A. and Canada. 

For more information contact: Dr. Akhtar Khwaja, Ph.D. 

Certified Professional Soil Scientist 
Certified Professional Agronomist 
Phone Number 414-426-2220; Out of WI 1 -800-356-6045; FAX 414-426-2664 



Page 22 CRANBERRIES December 1989 




>P->ri^Sg^^ 



Fof Rel}$ble Dtedies Bnd Pumps, 
Cmbeny Gfomn Look to Ctmhlli 

Your Crisafulli pumping equipment will be manufactured 
just for you, with your choice of power options and 
discharge size. If you need to dredge sand, call us for 
quotations and specifications. We will supply you with 
exactly what you need, not something designed for 
somebody else! For information, quotations, local 
representation, call: 



1 -800-442-7867 



or FAX 406-365-8088 




7360 058 




CRANBERRIES December 1989 Page 23 



Take Good 

Care of Yourself 

Have an Ocean Sfiray 



f 



^■^ 




^cean%^^' 



The farmer's cooperative that brings you 
a wide range of natural fruit juices, drinks and sauces 

Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc., Lakeville-Middleboro, MA 02349 
An Equal Opportunity Employer 



a uMimjmW WJWg i llll I' l l III m il II I I 



.\'..i.iC 
^)0«t^fjMM:; CO INC 



DEC 6 1989 

100 CAMBRIDGE STREET 
CHARLESTOWN. MASS. 






■Ill IWI^HiliiPIHII'itfWffWIT